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By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | November 17, 2000
Benjamin S. Markley Jr., who built charter, pleasure and crabbers' boats in a family-owned boat yard in Middle River, died Nov. 10 of a heart attack at Fort Pierce, Fla. He was 65 and lived in the Middleborough section of Baltimore County. His parents bought the marina and boat yard on Nanticoke Road in 1945. When he was age 9, he started helping his father at Markley's Boat Yard, painting and varnishing boats. He built his first boat - a wooden Chris-Craft kit boat - when he was age 16 with the help of Constance "Connie" Clark, whom he married after graduating from Kenwood High School in 1954.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | May 16, 2014
Molly O. Molter, the last surviving member of the family that owned Owens Yacht Co., who was known as "The Lady Boat Builder," died May 2 of respiratory failure at Genesis Eldercare Spa Creek Center in Annapolis. She was 104. The daughter of Charles C. Owens, a vice president of Westinghouse Electric Corp., and Mary Agnes Glynn Owens, a homemaker, the former Molly Glynn Owens was born in Brooklyn, N.Y., and moved with her family to Detroit in 1912. In 1925, they settled in Annapolis, where Mrs. Molter graduated from high school.
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NEWS
October 10, 1997
WHEN THE U.S. Sailboat Show comes to Annapolis, parking becomes impossible, every restaurant table and hotel room seems to be booked and throngs of people flood the historic downtown's narrow streets.Blessed with unseasonably warm weather and a booming national economy, this weekend's boat show may attract more visitors than ever. This is good news for exhibitors, but also good news for Maryland's state capital.In its 28 years, the boat show has become one of the most important national exhibits for the yachting community.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | February 7, 2012
John B. "Jack" Owens, who had been a principal in the family-owned Owens Yacht Co., the legendary Annapolis boat builder, and later established a real estate firm, died Saturday of heart failure at his Naples, Fla., home. He was 96. Mr. Owens was born in Detroit, where his father was a vice president of Westinghouse Electric Corp. and his mother was a homemaker. After his wife's death in 1918, the elder Mr. Owens moved his children to Spa Creek in Eastport, Annapolis, so relatives could help him raise his daughter and four sons.
NEWS
July 15, 1994
More than a thousand jobs were lost in Maryland during the boating industry's four-year slump. Marinas, which during the boom had been filled to capacity, had lots of vacancies. Boat builders had surplus stock at hand as financially squeezed would-be purchasers deserted show rooms.Still, Maryland was not the state worst hit by a combination of recession and the 10 percent luxury tax on boats priced above $100,000. Now that the tax is his tory, the boating industry is staging a slow comeback.
NEWS
By Stacey Evers and Stacey Evers,States News Service | May 28, 1991
WASHINGTON -- To combat what they say was an attack by Congress on a defenseless industry, boat users, manufacturers and dealers are forming a federal political action committee to fight back."
BUSINESS
By Leslie Cauley and Leslie Cauley,Staff Writer | March 5, 1992
ANNAPOLIS -- When New Zealand's flat-hulled racing yacht beat its Italian opponent by 76 seconds in recent America's Cup trials, George Hazen of Annapolis could take at least some of the credit.It was Mr. Hazen's computer program that was used to design the New Zealand, a million-dollar sailing vessel that was among about a dozen yachts participating in the trials off San Diego.The outcome of those contests will determine which yachts compete in the America's Cup, the premier sporting event of the sailing elite, when it begins in May.Mr.
NEWS
By Bill Burton and Bill Burton,Evening Sun Outdoor Editor | January 20, 1991
Multipurpose craft is the theme for the 1991 fleet of 550 boat that will anchor in the Baltimore Convention Center and Festival Hall beginning next Sunday for the nine-day 37th annual Chesapeake Bay Boat Show.The boat show continues through Feb. 3. Hours are Saturdays 11 a.m. to 10 p.m.; Sundays, 11 a.m. to 7 p.m.; Monday through Friday, 5 p.m. to 10 p.m. Admission is $7 for adults, $3 for children. For information, call 385-1800.One boat for everything from water-skiing and cruising to fishin and partying is the focus of boat builders as the industry and consumers tighten their belts with an eye on the economy and events in the Persian Gulf.
NEWS
By ANNIE LINSKEY | April 23, 2006
Eleanor Mordaunt, the logistics manager for the Volvo Ocean Race yacht Movistar, doesn't exactly like it when things go wrong. But if everything always went smoothly, she wouldn't enjoy her job. "I think I like to be improvising ... when you get that panicked phone call from the boat," she said. Mordaunt, 35, is one of the few women in a senior position on a Volvo Ocean Race team. She is part of the traveling shore team that flies around the world while the boats are racing and prepares for their arrival.
BUSINESS
By Ross Hetrick and Ross Hetrick,Sun Staff Writer | July 10, 1994
SALISBURY -- The large open shop is filled with the whine of sand blasting equipment and the smell of spray paint as men in white paper overalls fashion fiberglass and steel into $300,000 yachts. Seven of the gleaming white yachts, which measure 45 to 47 feet long, line the main work area of the Bayliner plant here.Times are good for the Bayliner Marine Corp. plant, which builds more than 100 of the yachts a year, or two every week.For Pat B. Alschlager, a level two supervisor, and the 100 people who work at the plant, the upturn in business has one overriding result.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | August 24, 2008
Maynard Winslow Lowery, a third-generation Tilghman Island boat builder who was renowned for the Cape Cod catboats and other vessels he built in a ramshackle Quonset hut overlooking Knapps Narrows for nearly 60 years, was killed Monday with his sister. Their car collided with a state police cruiser in St. Michaels that was on its way to investigate a traffic accident. Mr. Lowery, 88, died at the scene, and his sister, Alma Louise Lowery, 87, died later at Easton Memorial Hospital. "Maynard was a much-respected institution who represented a craftsmanship and tradition of boat building that is fast disappearing," said John H. Miller, vice president of advancement at the Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum in St. Michaels.
NEWS
By ANNIE LINSKEY and ANNIE LINSKEY,SUN REPORTER | April 25, 2006
Using a sponge, a squeegee and a piece of fine sandpaper, Andy Walker smoothed the surface of a stabilizing fin, rubbing out the bumps and bruises left on the board as it protruded from under a yacht in the first half of a race around the world. Nearby, Jerry Gale, a boat builder from a rival team in the Volvo Ocean Race, mixed a batch of bluish paste and scraped thin layers of it onto a spare rudder. Like doctors at a nautical hospital, the sailmakers, boat builders and riggers at a Baltimore marina are patching the damage inflicted by the fury of Mother Nature.
NEWS
By ANNIE LINSKEY | April 23, 2006
Eleanor Mordaunt, the logistics manager for the Volvo Ocean Race yacht Movistar, doesn't exactly like it when things go wrong. But if everything always went smoothly, she wouldn't enjoy her job. "I think I like to be improvising ... when you get that panicked phone call from the boat," she said. Mordaunt, 35, is one of the few women in a senior position on a Volvo Ocean Race team. She is part of the traveling shore team that flies around the world while the boats are racing and prepares for their arrival.
NEWS
By Todd Holden and Todd Holden,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 21, 2003
When he was 8 years old, Don Boehl loved to jump into big piles of sawdust. He and his father scavenged old wooden fruit boxes for white pine that could be made into World War I model planes. Boehl credits his dad, now 86, and a neighbor with instilling in him a love of wood. More than 20 members of the Chesapeake Wooden Boat Builders gathered recently to work on projects as varied as canoe restoration, model building and caning. The members helped one another, teaching and learning with the harmonious hum of chitchat, broken every now and then by laughter or the sound of a hammer.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | November 17, 2000
Benjamin S. Markley Jr., who built charter, pleasure and crabbers' boats in a family-owned boat yard in Middle River, died Nov. 10 of a heart attack at Fort Pierce, Fla. He was 65 and lived in the Middleborough section of Baltimore County. His parents bought the marina and boat yard on Nanticoke Road in 1945. When he was age 9, he started helping his father at Markley's Boat Yard, painting and varnishing boats. He built his first boat - a wooden Chris-Craft kit boat - when he was age 16 with the help of Constance "Connie" Clark, whom he married after graduating from Kenwood High School in 1954.
NEWS
By TaNoah Morgan and TaNoah Morgan,SUN STAFF | June 3, 1999
The maritime roots of the Hartge family -- owner and operator of the Hartge Yacht Yard in Galesville for 133 years -- unfolded on the banks of the West River along a 17 1/2-acre strip that became known statewide for its boat building and repairs.This is the family that became known for building Chesapeake 20 racers, the best-known racing sailboats on the Chesapeake Bay in the 1930s and 1940s. It's the family that built the ketch sailboat still used to represent Washington at official celebrations.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Staff Writer | June 21, 1992
Every visitor to the usual sort of boat show knows the prevailing smell: a chemical tang vaguely reminiscent of model airplane glue. The essence of fiberglass lingers, for the vast majority of modern pleasure boats are made from the resilient, synthetic material.Ah, but take a whiff of the air in the coming days at the Newport Yachting Center in Newport, R.I. You might recognize the distinctly organic aromas of pine and cedar, mixed with the heady scents of spar varnish and teak oil.For "plastic" boats, as fiberglass craft are sometimes disparagingly called, need not apply to the 1992 WoodenBoat Show, returning this weekend to Newport after a three-year hiatus.
NEWS
By ANNIE LINSKEY and ANNIE LINSKEY,SUN REPORTER | April 25, 2006
Using a sponge, a squeegee and a piece of fine sandpaper, Andy Walker smoothed the surface of a stabilizing fin, rubbing out the bumps and bruises left on the board as it protruded from under a yacht in the first half of a race around the world. Nearby, Jerry Gale, a boat builder from a rival team in the Volvo Ocean Race, mixed a batch of bluish paste and scraped thin layers of it onto a spare rudder. Like doctors at a nautical hospital, the sailmakers, boat builders and riggers at a Baltimore marina are patching the damage inflicted by the fury of Mother Nature.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 27, 1998
E. W. "Skip" Etchells, a boat builder and world champion yachtsman, died Dec. 20 at Memorial Hospital in Easton. He was 87.Most yacht racing is done in one-design sailboats, all built to a specific design so that the outcome rests with the skill of the crew rather than the builder.In the 1940s and the 1950s, Mr. Etchells dominated international competition in the one-design Star class. In the 1960s, he created a new one-design yacht, the Etchells 22, now known as the International Etchells class.
NEWS
October 10, 1997
WHEN THE U.S. Sailboat Show comes to Annapolis, parking becomes impossible, every restaurant table and hotel room seems to be booked and throngs of people flood the historic downtown's narrow streets.Blessed with unseasonably warm weather and a booming national economy, this weekend's boat show may attract more visitors than ever. This is good news for exhibitors, but also good news for Maryland's state capital.In its 28 years, the boat show has become one of the most important national exhibits for the yachting community.
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