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NEWS
By TaNoah Morgan and TaNoah Morgan,SUN STAFF | January 8, 2001
When a Giant Food store opened in Clarksville two years ago, Elizabeth Connolly had a sinking feeling. "My stomach flipped," she said of her first glimpse of the large, new grocery store. "I thought, `How are we going to compete with this?' " Sixty thousand square feet of canned goods, produce and baked goods in a brightly lighted supermarket with wide aisles - all of this seemed too much like a real-life giant that would dwarf the small, 70-year-old grocery store her grandfather founded.
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FEATURES
By Samantha Iacia, For The Baltimore Sun | August 1, 2014
Date: June 6 Her story: Ashley Boarman, 27, grew up in Olney. She is a senior account executive at MGH Inc., an advertising firm based in Owings Mills. Her parents, Jeff and Alice Boarman, live in Olney. His story: Doug Jagoda, 28, was born in New Jersey and moved to Derwood in Montgomery County when he was 8. He is the assistant superintendent at Clark Construction Group in Bethesda. His mother, Elaine Adornetto, and stepfather, Tom Adornetto, live in Derwood. Their story: Ashley and Doug met through a mutual friend in 2007 when they were home for summer vacation during college.
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SPORTS
By Katherine Dunn and Katherine Dunn,SUN STAFF | September 2, 2005
Christina Boarman took a little break from field hockey this summer. For the first time since knee surgery claimed her freshman season, the St. Paul's senior did not play a game or attend an organized practice for more than a month before the Gators started preseason last week. Instead, Boarman worked, visited colleges, spent time with her family and showed her pigs and sheep at the Howard County Fair. "I love playing hockey, but I think sometimes you get a little overcharged," said Boarman, 17. "You need a little time in there to think about other things.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | February 21, 2013
Fifty-eight years after it opened in Highland, Boarman's Old-Fashioned Meat Market is still, in many respects, living up to its name. Boarman family members still mix spices for the pork sausage made in house, the staff butcher still stuffs the sausage skin, still cuts meat to order and, more recently, started smoking bacon with apple wood he gets from a neighbor. Boarman's is possibly Howard County's last all-purpose market that's not part of a chain, offering everything from household cleaners to beer and wine, canned goods, produce, house-made crab cakes and custom cuts of meat.
NEWS
January 18, 1995
POLICE LOG* Highland: 13400 block of Clarksville Pike: Someone shattered the front glass door of Boarman's Market and took cigarettes yesterday morning, police said.
NEWS
By Erik Nelson and Erik Nelson,Sun Staff Writer | September 22, 1994
In a time when supermarkets are getting larger and more impersonal, at least one store appears to be surviving despite bucking the trend.It probably doesn't hurt that Boarman's Old Fashioned Meat Market, selling everything from hard liquor to hog brains, is in Highland, one of the most affluent neighborhoods in the Baltimore-Washington area."
NEWS
By Erik Nelson and Erik Nelson,Sun Staff Writer | September 22, 1994
In a time when supermarkets are getting larger and more impersonal, at least one store appears to be surviving despite bucking a trend.It probably doesn't hurt that Boarman's Old Fashioned Meat Market, selling everything from hard liquor to hog brains, is in Highland, one of the most affluent neighborhoods in the Baltimore-Washington area."
NEWS
By MELISSA HARRIS and MELISSA HARRIS,SUN REPORTER | April 14, 2006
A three-alarm fire destroyed a large Fulton house early yesterday, causing $2.5 million to $3 million in damage and forcing firefighters to shuttle water from the nearest fire hydrant miles away at Fulton Elementary School, a county fire official said. The fire erupted about 2:15 a.m. at the home of George Boarman, owner of Boarman's Meat Market in Highland. Boarman, his wife, Teresa, and their three children were asleep when sparks that "sounded like gunshots" popped from the back of the house, Teresa Boarman said.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | April 6, 1998
A 17-year-old boy was killed yesterday when the motorcycle he was riding slammed into a truck in Clarksville, police said.Police said the teen, whose name was withheld, was riding a 1997 Honda motorcycle south in the 13100 block of Highland Road near Prestwick Drive about 7 p.m. when he veered to the left and slammed into the driver's side door of a 1991 Chevy Suburban driven by George L. Boarman, 44.Police said the teen was pronounced dead at the scene....
SPORTS
By Mike Farabaugh and Mike Farabaugh,Evening Sun Staff | October 11, 1990
There is a fundamental reason why Overlea's boys soccer team is outscoring its opponents by a 32-7 margin.The Falcons are using their heads more this season.Even after yesterday's 3-2 overtime loss to Catonsville, Overlea's record stood at 7-1 overall and 6-1 in the Baltimore County Class 2A-1A league. Hereford, the three-time defending Class 2A state co-champion, looms ahead. The Bulls are 5-0 in league play and 6-0-1 overall and will play host to Overlea next Wednesday.Overlea's success this year actually began back in fifth grade for the present crop of seniors.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | December 3, 2010
City police made an arrest Friday in a 2007 killing that occurred in Northwest Baltimore, near Reisterstown Road and West Cold Spring Lane. Mark Durand Winchester, 31, of the 4300 block of Reisterstown Road is charged with first-degree murder in the July 14, 2007, shooting death of Yemel McMillan, 23. McMillan was shot in the head in the 2800 block of Boarman Ave., about a mile south of Pimlico Race Course , police said. He was one of four fatal shootings that July weekend.
NEWS
By Annie Linskey and Josh Mitchell | February 10, 2007
A youth basketball coach was fatally shot outside a recreational center in North Baltimore Thursday night, police said. Darnell G. Gaither, 34, was getting into his car in front of the Walter P. Carter rec center in the 800 block of E. 43rd Street about 8:40 p.m. A car pulled alongside and someone inside opened fire before the gunman's vehicle sped away, said Agent Donny Moses, a police spokesman. Gaither was pronounced dead at Johns Hopkins Hospital about 9:10 p.m. Moses said Gaither was not robbed and that police knew of no motives or suspects.
NEWS
By SANDY ALEXANDER and SANDY ALEXANDER,SUN REPORTER | May 7, 2006
The Greater Highland Crossroads Association has a vision for the intersection of Routes 216 and 108: a common architectural style and attractive landscaping that preserves the rural character of the crossroads village. But the majority of property owners who will be subject to the association's new design guidelines feel that a valuable idea is being derailed by the details. The document makes numerous recommendations ranging from the size and material for buildings to the pitch of the roof, the type of signage and the spacing of boards in a picket fence.
NEWS
By MELISSA HARRIS and MELISSA HARRIS,SUN REPORTER | April 14, 2006
A three-alarm fire destroyed a large Fulton house early yesterday, causing $2.5 million to $3 million in damage and forcing firefighters to shuttle water from the nearest fire hydrant miles away at Fulton Elementary School, a county fire official said. The fire erupted about 2:15 a.m. at the home of George Boarman, owner of Boarman's Meat Market in Highland. Boarman, his wife, Teresa, and their three children were asleep when sparks that "sounded like gunshots" popped from the back of the house, Teresa Boarman said.
SPORTS
By Katherine Dunn and Katherine Dunn,SUN STAFF | September 2, 2005
Christina Boarman took a little break from field hockey this summer. For the first time since knee surgery claimed her freshman season, the St. Paul's senior did not play a game or attend an organized practice for more than a month before the Gators started preseason last week. Instead, Boarman worked, visited colleges, spent time with her family and showed her pigs and sheep at the Howard County Fair. "I love playing hockey, but I think sometimes you get a little overcharged," said Boarman, 17. "You need a little time in there to think about other things.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mason Marcus and Mason Marcus,SUN STAFF | July 21, 2005
While the city's trendiest denizens - the hipster elite - can usually be found sipping whiskey tonics at Sonar's Taxidermy Lounge, those searching for the best indie dance party in town should look no further than the Ottobar's monthly Underground dance party. The Converse-clad regulars celebrate the party's fourth anniversary Saturday in royal style with the best Britpop, indie, electro and new wave the city has to offer. The party is the creation of Matt Walter and Craig Boarman, who started indie dance nights in Baltimore when they saw a similar party called Mousetrap at the Black Cat Club in Washington.
NEWS
By James M. Coram and James M. Coram,SUN STAFF | December 6, 1995
An article in the Howard County edition yesterday incorrectly included a statement by a Harper's Choice Village Board member that a Mexican restaurant will open in the village center later this month. In fact, the restaurant, Gringada, opened in October.The Sun regrets the error.Harper's Choice resident Diane Boarman braved the rain on foot last night to get answers from the Rouse Co. about the future of her troubled village shopping center.But Rouse representatives didn't show up at the Harper's Choice Village Board meeting to which they had been invited.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mason Marcus and Mason Marcus,SUN STAFF | July 21, 2005
While the city's trendiest denizens - the hipster elite - can usually be found sipping whiskey tonics at Sonar's Taxidermy Lounge, those searching for the best indie dance party in town should look no further than the Ottobar's monthly Underground dance party. The Converse-clad regulars celebrate the party's fourth anniversary Saturday in royal style with the best Britpop, indie, electro and new wave the city has to offer. The party is the creation of Matt Walter and Craig Boarman, who started indie dance nights in Baltimore when they saw a similar party called Mousetrap at the Black Cat Club in Washington.
NEWS
By Matthew Dolan and Matthew Dolan,SUN STAFF | January 3, 2005
A once-promising Ravens season teetered on the brink yesterday morning. Entry into the postseason depended on a seemingly impossible dream: a win for Baltimore and losses for three other NFL teams. What was a worried football fan to do? In a word, tailgate. Outdoor oases filled with beer, burgers and banter popped up again yesterday morning for the last time this season. On the well-tended Ravens stadium parking lots and in hard-bitten industrial corners of South Baltimore, football aficionados spent time trashing their team's embattled offensive coordinator, pitying the Ravens' high-performing defense and looking with hope to next season.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay and Liz F. Kay,SUN STAFF | May 3, 2004
Developers of two corners of western Howard County's Highland crossroads are preparing plans that they hope will ease traffic concerns while maintaining the area's rural character. Operators of Boarman's Meat Market and the developers of a property once destined to become a large funeral home want to dedicate the front of their properties to create turn lanes to increase the capacity of the two-lane intersection that experiences frequent backups. Boarman's, which has sold groceries and homemade sausages in Highland for 50 years, plans to triple the size of its shop, incorporate the nearby pharmacy and put gasoline pumps in the rear.
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