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HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | June 14, 2014
Revelations that a former Catonsville doctor obtained his Maryland medical license despite having a rape conviction on his record is sparking a push for criminal background checks of physicians - a proposal that has failed and been ignored in recent years. As recently as 2013, state lawmakers considered a bill that encouraged checks for a wide range of health care providers, including doctors. It breezed through hearings and appeared headed for passage, but was pulled after a dispute over a single word, and was not reintroduced in this year's General Assembly session.
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HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | June 12, 2014
The Maryland Board of Physicians upheld on Thursday its decision to suspend Dr. William Dando's medical license based on his indictment in Allegany County for an alleged sexual assault. Dando appeared before the board Wednesday and was given the chance to argue why the suspension, issued June 5, should be lifted. A presentation from Dando and his lawyer did not dissuade the board that "there exists a substantial risk of serious harm to the public health, safety or welfare in Dr. Dando's continued practice," acting board Executive Director Christine Farrelly wrote in a letter posted to the board website Thursday.
NEWS
June 12, 2014
Last week, the Maryland Board of Physicians, in conjunction with Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene Secretary Dr. Joshua Sharfstein, requested an investigation from the Office of the Inspector General into matters related to the 1996 licensure of William Dando ( "Allegany doctor pleads not guilty to sexually assaulting patient," June 10). This action is reflective of the steadfast commitment to improvement and transparency that the Board of Physicians has embraced since my appointment by Gov. Martin O'Malley to chair the board two years ago. The board has enacted almost every recommendation made in the 2011 Department of Legislative Services audit as well as those from the independent review report issued by University of Maryland, Baltimore President Dr. Jay Perman and colleagues.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | June 11, 2014
Robert L. Karwacki, a retired Maryland Court of Appeals judge who was president of the Baltimore City Board of School Commissioners during the troubled early 1970s, died of kidney failure Monday at his Chester home. The former Mount Vernon resident was 80. He was named head of the city's school board in 1970 and assisted in the appointment of Baltimore's first African-American schools superintendent. "Brown v. the Board was years earlier; Bob was a master in maintaining educational stability," said former Baltimore Mayor Thomas J. D'Alesandro III, who named him to the school post.
NEWS
Letter to The Aegis | June 10, 2014
As a resident of Fallston (District B), I was disappointed to see that The Aegis endorsed every sitting Board of Education candidate. The argument in favor of the sitting candidates seemed to be that they had experience on the Board. If that is the standard, we could argue that Board members should be appointed for life. No need to have an election and get new perspectives on the Board. In the three to four years that many of these Board members have been on the Board, we have had a consistently underfunded school system, a complete breakdown in cooperation between the Board and the funding authorities, significantly underpaid teachers and staff, a loss of qualified teachers and a reduction in services and instruction.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | June 10, 2014
The Baltimore Police Department says it will begin to post a log of its investigations into serious use of force by officers online, and for the first time will ask the city's civilian review board to look at shootings involving its officers and deaths of people in custody. Police Commissioner Anthony W. Batts said the move was the latest in a series intended to improve transparency and accountability. "We have a responsibility to be as forthright and transparent as the law allows us to be, especially when it comes to our use of force," Batts told reporters Tuesday.
NEWS
By M.E. Tobin | June 9, 2014
The city is paying for a series of temporary murals to be painted across vacant buildings throughout Baltimore - a momentary beautification effort that will last only until the former homes are town down. The "Love Letters to Baltimore" project by artist Stephen Powers (which so far consists of the words "Forever together" and "I am here because it's home" in giant letters along the fronts of row homes on East Eager Street and the side of a building on North Milton, respectively)
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | June 7, 2014
If patients in Maryland want to learn about complaints or concerns about their doctors, there is little that can be made public under state law. But that's not the case in all states. Complaints made to medical licensing boards are made public in nine states, according to the Federation of State Medical Boards. Here and in most of the rest of the country, complaints are kept confidential. The Maryland Board of Physicians makes allegations public only when it has taken action to discipline a doctor.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | June 4, 2014
George Arlotto officially become Anne Arundel County's next superintendent Wednesday, signing a four-year contract with an annual salary of $245,000. Arlotto, a former principal in Montgomery County, follows Kevin Maxwell, who left the school system last year to take a similar position in Prince George's County. Maxwell had worked with Arlotto when they were both in Montgomery County, and Maxwell lured him to Anne Arundel in 2006. Maxwell's salary as superintendent had been $257,000.
HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | June 4, 2014
To become licensed as a nurse, a social worker or even to drive around dead bodies in Maryland, a criminal background check is required. But not to get a doctor's license. Instead, the state Board of Physicians asks would-be doctors to voluntarily disclose arrests and convictions. That could change as soon as next year. Already considering a background check policy, the board may move more urgently following news that it granted a medical license to a doctor with a previous rape conviction who now has been charged with sexually assaulting a patient in Allegany County.
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