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By Lorraine Mirabella | lorraine.mirabella@baltsun.com | April 8, 2010
Women make up a smaller share of board directors at Maryland companies than they do at corporations nationally, although they continue to gain ground as directors in the state, a report out Thursday shows. The report from Network 2000, a statewide nonprofit advocacy group, shows that women held 9.2 percent of the 772 corporate board seats available at Maryland-based public companies in 2009. Nationally, women held 15.2 percent of board seats, according to the annual census of women on corporate boards.
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NEWS
December 31, 2011
As the founder of property Taxpayers United, Baltimore County, I've followed closely the progress - or lack of it - at the Maryland State Department of Assessments and Taxation ("Marylanders face long waits in assessment appeals," Dec. 27). Quite frankly, I've grown tired of appeals board administrator Kent Finkelsen's excuses for not handling cases more expeditiously. I've had some good experiences helping fellow homeowners protest unfair reassessments at the Baltimore and Montgomery county appeals boards.
NEWS
August 5, 1992
State School Superintendent Nancy S. Grasmick's resignation from the board of Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Maryland is entirely appropriate. As the State Ethics Commission determined, there are potential conflicts between her duties as a state official and those as a director of the state's largest health insurer.The resignation occurred at the time state regulators and congressional investigators are asking tough questions about the management and financial condition of the Maryland Blues.
SPORTS
By Pat O'Malley and Pat O'Malley,SUN STAFF | December 10, 2000
Jai Lewis controlled the boards and Gary Neal and Teon Edwards lit up the scoreboard as host and No. 5-ranked Aberdeen ran away from No. 4 St. Frances after halftime and went on to an impressive 82-66 romp yesterday. In what was the final of the Eagles' first Kickoff Classic in Harford County, Neal scored 15 of his 23 points in the third period. Hitting a trio of threes and short jumpers, Neal, a 6-foot-4 junior point guard, concluded his 15-point binge with a slam dunk, as the Eagles pushed their halftime lead from 33-28 to 57-38.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | February 5, 2013
R. Gayle Layfield, a retired Friends School official who worked in fundraising, died of cancer Feb. 1 at her North Baltimore home. She was 64. Born Ruth Gayle Layfield in Richmond, Va., she was a 1966 graduate of the Collegiate School, where she was class president and played sports. She earned a bachelor of arts degree at Hollins College, where she was active on the trustee and alumnae boards. She also received a master's degree from the Johns Hopkins University. After moving to Baltimore in the mid-1970s, she was an English teacher at Roland Park Country School, where she was also director of admissions and worked in development.
SPORTS
By Matt Vensel | May 24, 2011
Slide over, Pekka Rinne. We now have a new best save of the 2011 Stanley Cup playoffs courtesy of Boston's Tim Thomas, who robbed Tampa Bay's Steve Downie with a sprawling paddle save in the third period Monday. That "lucky" save helped the Bruins secure a 3-2 series lead in the Eastern Conference finals. After a shot from the point missed the net and caromed off the end boards toward the crease, the Bruins' All-Star goalie dove back from the top of his paint and rejected Downie's point-blank shot.
NEWS
September 9, 2010
In advance of Banned Books Week (Sept. 25-Oct. 2) I want to thank the often unheralded defenders of my First Amendment rights — librarians — who have quietly fought and continue to fight censorship. Large amounts of great literature have been banned at one time or another by self-appointed arbiters of the public morality — churches, school boards, censor boards, etc. — because these books have asked questions or described situations that made the rich and powerful uncomfortable or offended someone's sensibilities.
BUSINESS
By LESTER A PICKER | August 19, 1991
The opening paragraph of the news release was intriguing -- if not exactly understandable: "The United Way System in Central Maryland today effected a merger of its multi-corporate operations into a single, unified organization to better meet community needs."As explained later in the release, the United Way System has operated over the past several years as three separate corporations, all under the same umbrella.One corporation handled all fund-raising tasks, one took care of allocating those funds to community organizations and programs, and the third provided administrative support.
SPORTS
By Katherine Dunn, Kevin Eck, Bill Free, Lem Satterfield, Stan Rappaport | March 13, 1997
State semifinalsBOYS(at College Park)No. 6 Dunbar (17-6) vs.Crossland (24-3)Class: 3ATime: 3 p.m.Outlook: Dunbar takes a 10-game winning streak into today's semifinal, and is going for its fifth straight state title. Sophomore C-F Jamal Brown (6-6) averages 13 points and rebounds with five blocks. Senior wide-body Chris Dean (6-5) averages nine points and rebounds with three blocks. With Crossland, ranked No. 3 in the Washington, D.C., area and boasting 6-8 Henry Rascoe (15.6 points, 10.2 boards)
NEWS
December 12, 2011
Regarding your recent story about Stevenson University president Kevin Manning ("Report: Stevenson chief among highest-paid at private colleges," Dec. 5): Since leaving Towson in 1978, I have served on the boards of 10 colleges and universities and two preparatory schools, and I can say from experience that no college president in America has been more effective than Mr. Manning at Stevenson. During a generally declining period, he has increased enrollment, academic programs, faculty credentials and private support for the school.
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