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By John-John Williams IV and John-John Williams IV,sun reporter | September 3, 2006
With five seats up for grabs and a historic expansion to seven members set to take place by the year's end, it is anyone's guess what the Howard County Board of Education will look like after the general election. Voters will get a better sense of that after the Sept. 12 primary election, when the field of 14 candidates is whittled to 10 who will appear on the November ballot. And if incumbents Joshua Kaufman and Patricia S. Gordon are selected during the primary, they still must survive the November vote.
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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 1, 2006
KANSAS CITY, Kan. --God and Charles Darwin are not on the primary ballot in Kansas today, but once again a contentious schools election has religion and science at odds in a state that has restaged a three-quarter-century-old battle over the teaching of evolution. Less than a year after a conservative Republican majority on the State Board of Education adopted the most far-reaching standards in the nation defining science education in ways that challenge Darwin's theory of evolution, moderate Republicans and Democrats are mounting a fierce counterattack to retake power and switch the standards back to what they call conventional science.
NEWS
By JOHN-JOHN WILLIAMS IV | May 7, 2006
Wossen Ayele, a 17-year-old junior at Atholton High School and newly elected student member of the Howard County Board of Education, plans to increase the communication between the board and students and continue the work of classmate and current member Jeff Lasser. Ayele has closely followed what Lasser - who also attends Atholton - has done in this past school year to prepare him for the position. "I believe that the students have a legitimate stake in the Board of Education," Ayele said.
NEWS
By GINA DAVIS and GINA DAVIS,SUN REPORTER | March 26, 2006
A State Board of Education proposal to require training for school board members - having been repudiated by several local boards - has been quashed, according to the state panel's chief. "There wasn't a whole lot of enthusiasm for it," said Edward L. Root, president of the State Board of Education, in a recent telephone interview. "There was no point in doing it." The head of Carroll's school board said last week that he was grateful the proposal has been dropped and applauded the state board for soliciting local opinions before reaching a conclusion.
FEATURES
By LINELL SMITH and LINELL SMITH,SUN REPORTER | March 15, 2006
It's the kind of bright, photogenic Saturday morning that would seem ideal for shooting a movie. But filmmakers Kevin Tolson and Sam McLaughlin are instead tucked away in a high school history office, hunched over an Apple computer. The seniors at Polytechnic Institute are patiently sifting through digital images - a task that appears to have all the drama of an IT appointment. Look closer, though, and it's clear the creative process is in full bloom. "A lot of this is based on gut instinct," Tolson, 18, says as he sorts through pictures from the 1950s.
NEWS
By SARA NEUFELD and SARA NEUFELD,SUN REPORTER | March 7, 2006
About 200 people turned out last night to air their concerns about planned school closings at a public hearing scheduled by the school board, but only two of the board's nine members showed up for the session at Lake Clifton High School. Board members were outnumbered by members of the City Council, which held its own meeting an hour earlier than usual so members could attend the hearing. At least five council members were in the audience, including President Sheila Dixon. "I find it appalling that the school board couldn't come in its full complement to hear the needs of the community," said Aaron Wilkes, who spoke on behalf of the Darley Park Community Association, protesting the proposed relocation of children from Highlandtown Middle School and Elmer A. Henderson Elementary to Harford Heights Primary-Intermediate School.
NEWS
By PHILLIP MCGOWAN and PHILLIP MCGOWAN,SUN REPORTER | February 26, 2006
One declared he would bring Anne Arundel County more into the 21st century. Another said he would rebuild the public's trust in how county government spends money. A third warned of overly flowery campaign promises. The seven candidates for county executive have been sharpening their campaign messages for months, and last week the full list of contenders -- five Republicans and two Democrats -- started testing those themes during a debate on education issues in Annapolis. Before an audience of more than 50 people, most of the candidates reaffirmed their support for building a 13th high school and for bringing more local control to the selection of the county school board.
NEWS
By LEM SATTERFIELD and LEM SATTERFIELD,SUN REPORTER | January 25, 2006
Poly wrestler Kevin Tolson believes he has a firm grip on the school's integration history, and, along with Engineers swimmer Sam McLaughlin, has been submerged in records, research and investigative reporting. "We're working on a documentary called The Integration of Poly, and we're trying to prove that Poly was the first public high school south of the Mason-Dixon Line to integrate," said Tolson, the Engineers' 160-pound senior captain. "Everything until now has said no integration in public high schools in the south took place before Brown vs. the Board of Education in 1954, but we know that our school was integrated two years before that," Tolson said.
NEWS
By ANICA BUTLER and ANICA BUTLER,SUN REPORTER | December 23, 2005
With a wish list completed and advertisements running nationally, the search for Anne Arundel County's next superintendent is under way. Bea Gordon of the Maryland Association of Boards of Education is leading the hunt and says that inquiries about the job are already coming in, a week after the job posting was placed in a national education publication and on the association's Web site. Gordon said 150 community and staff members attended three community forums and another 150 submitted written responses to help Gordon and her associates from MABE figure out what the school system is looking for. The input was the most Gordon has seen in a superintendent search in Maryland, she told the Anne Arundel board of education at its meeting Wednesday night.
NEWS
By JOHN-JOHN WILLIAMS IV and JOHN-JOHN WILLIAMS IV,SUN REPORTER | December 7, 2005
When Courtney Watson steps down as chairman of the Howard County Board of Education tomorrow night, it will be the first of many changes involving the panel that oversees Maryland's top-rated public school system. There is a possibility that only one current member - Diane Mikulis - will be on the board when it expands from five to seven members next December. Watson is scheduled to announce today her plans to run for a county government position next year when her current school board term ends.
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