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By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,Sun Staff Writer | August 25, 1995
Bell Atlantic Corp. will disband the outside boards of directors of its state operating companies, including Bell Atlantic-Maryland, and replace them with all-employee boards, a company spokesman said yesterday.The board of the Philadelphia-based parent company will continue to have outside directors.The state-level boards will disband at the end of the year, said spokesman Jay Grossman.The change does little more than ratify a trend toward centralized operations of the telephone company.
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NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | September 5, 2014
The state ethics board is reviewing one of the firms bidding to build and operate the Purple Line after the engineering company was acquired by another MTA contractor. Engineering design firm AECOM, which in 2011 was awarded an 8-year, $60-million contract with the MTA to oversee the Purple Line and the proposed Red Line in Baltimore, among other projects, announced in July that it had reached an agreement to acquire engineering and construction firm URS Corp. URS Corp. is the lead design company for a group known as the Maryland Purple Line Partners, one of four groups that have been short-listed by the state to submit proposals for what will be a public-private partnership with the state to build the transit line linking Montgomery and Prince George's counties.
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NEWS
By Laurie Willis and Laurie Willis,SUN STAFF | May 7, 2002
The scene plays out routinely in Baltimore Circuit Court: A defendant shows up late for an arraignment and tells an irate judge he was across the street at the "other" courthouse by mistake. Or the defendant insists he was in the right building all along - but got lost. With the Clarence M. Mitchell Jr. Courthouse on the west side of Calvert Street and Courthouse East across from it - not to mention 35 courtrooms spread out over several floors in both buildings - it's no wonder people show up late for court on a daily basis.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | September 3, 2014
The case involving an Anne Arundel County elementary school student suspended last year after nibbling a pastry into the shape of a gun went before the county school board Wednesday, the latest attempt by the boy's parents to have the incident removed from his record. Joshua Welch, then a second-grader at Park Elementary school in Brooklyn Park, received a two-day suspension in March 2013 in a matter that drew national attention. The school system has argued that Joshua, who is now 9 and has been transferred to another school, was suspended not solely for the incident but for a series of behaviors.
NEWS
By Caitlin Francke and Caitlin Francke,SUN STAFF | August 29, 1998
The Baltimore and state election boards now say they have time to remove Sen. Clarence W. Blount's name from voting machines before the Democratic primary.Blount lost a suit in court on Wednesday filed against him by Del. Frank D. Boston Jr., a candidate for Blount's Senate seat. An Anne Arundel County Circuit judge ruled that Blount did not live in West Baltimore's 41st Legislative District and should not be on the ballot for his Senate seat. Blount has appealed that ruling.The boards had originally argued in the case that Blount's name could not be removed from the ballot in time for the Sept.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | October 5, 2013
Dr. Clementine L. "Clem" Kaufman, a former social worker and volunteer who also served for years on numerous boards throughout the community and worked tirelessly for social justice, died of cancer Sept. 23 at Roland Park Place. She was 89. "She was a phenomenal person, and I got to know her when she was one of then-President Michael Hooker's assistants," said Freeman A. Hrabowski III, current president of the University of Maryland, Baltimore County and a longtime friend. "She always cared about social justice issues, and she worked hard to connect us to those initiatives in the city.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | November 10, 2001
WASHINGTON - The tapes Doug Collins had watched of the Golden State Warriors showed a team that reflected the playing personality of its coach, Dave Cowens. In the 10 years he spent with the Boston Celtics, Cowens was one of the best rebounders in the NBA. "If we don't match them on the boards," Collins said an hour before last night's game, "we'll get overrun." The tapes didn't lie, and the Wizards didn't work. It proved to be a difficult combination at the sold-out MCI Center, where the Warriors dominated the boards at both ends and Michael Jordan, showing his age for longer stretches than at any time this season, dominated at neither.
NEWS
By David Nitkin and David Nitkin,SUN STAFF | February 15, 2003
The victor may get the spoils, but the losers aren't faring too badly in Maryland this year. Some prominent Democratic politicians left jobless after last year's election received consolation prizes yesterday when Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. unwrapped the first batch of appointments to the hundreds of boards his administration will fill. The state's first Republican governor in 36 years named former House Speaker Casper R. Taylor Jr. to the Maryland Health Care Commission, and former Prince George's County Executive Wayne K. Curry to the state Port Commission.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | May 3, 1997
WASHINGTON -- The National Association of Securities Dealers may get a recommendation to eliminate the boards of directors of its two subsidiaries in an attempt to streamline decision-making at the industry body, NASD's new top executive, Frank G. Zarb, said yesterday.That is a reversal for Zarb, who has repeatedly denied he might propose removal of the Nasdaq stock market and broker-regulatory boards.Yesterday Zarb, a former aide to Presidents Richard M. Nixon and Gerald R. Ford who has headed NASD for two months, said elimination of these boards is the most dramatic of three options he might recommend to the parent body's board June 26."
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN STAFF | May 6, 1998
Baltimore's officialdom gathered on a blighted block on the city's west side yesterday and celebrated something it usually doesn't brag about: how to better board up a vacant rowhouse.With television cameras rolling, Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke drove home a screw to secure a door-sized piece of plywood to the front of 3007 W. North Ave., a three-story brick house that is one of 13 vacant dwellings on the block. Two are occupied.The idea was not to highlight urban decay -- though the mayor acknowledged that the strip of crumbling, Victorian-era structures should be demolished.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | September 3, 2014
The Constellation will be moved from its location in Baltimore's Inner Harbor for four months this winter to undergo more than $2 million in repairs - including $750,000 to fix rotting in its hull. The city Board of Estimates, which oversees spending in Baltimore, voted to approve the $750,000 expenditure for the ship, which has been docked in the harbor for almost 60 years. Money for the repairs comes from general obligation bonds approved by city voters in 2012. The ship will be dry-docked at the U.S. Coast Guard Yard in Curtis Bay from Oct. 20 to Feb. 20 for the repairs, said Christopher Rowsom, director of Historic Ships in Baltimore.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | August 28, 2014
The State Board of Elections has alerted the Office of the State Prosecutor to a report that 164 people voted in both Maryland and Virginia in the November 2012 presidential election, in violation of the law. Election officials confirmed Thursday that the referral included 17 cases in which the Fairfax County, Va., elections board investigated the report by outside advocacy groups and said they found that ballots had been cast in that county and...
BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | August 28, 2014
City Councilman William H. Cole IV appeared as the new president of the Baltimore Development Corp. at its board meeting Thursday, on a day when the mayor announced six new board members and the board approved three new projects for the city's west side. The new appointments, which include former Mayor Kurt Schmoke, are the latest changes at the quasi-public agency. Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake chose Cole about two weeks ago to take over as the BDC's leader, replacing Brenda McKenzie, who cited personal and family reasons for her departure after less than two years.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and The Baltimore Sun | August 28, 2014
Maryland is hoping to have a successful debut in the Big Ten this year. With it, athletic department officials are hoping to enhance the experience of the fans both at Byrd Stadium and the recently renamed Xfinity Center. The athletic department announced Thursday that the giant videoboards at both venues have been upgraded for this season. There will be a new LED display at Byrd Stadium - including one with closed captioning - and side displays on a new Daktronic videoboard at the Xfinity Center.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | August 25, 2014
A former city school board member and city government worker who is accused of lying about his resume will be tried in court on fraud charges this fall. Anthony A. Hamilton, 35, who resigned from the school board as well as from the city's Health Department last August, used another man's Social Security number and student identification number to pretend to have degrees he didn't earn, prosecutors said in charging documents. Hamilton, who faces six fraud-related charges, was arraigned on Monday and has a trial scheduled for Oct. 27. His attorney could not be reached for comment.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | August 21, 2014
State Del. Pat McDonough has asked the Maryland State Prosecutor's Office to investigate whether the Baltimore County school board acted properly when it gave the superintendent an increase in his pay and benefits package of $27,000. McDonough believes Superintendent Dallas Dance's contract prohibits the board from giving the superintendent an increase in compensation that is larger than the teachers'. The board gave Dance a $5,000 raise as well as a $18,200 reimbursement for his contribution into the Maryland state retirement system and a larger payout for unused vacation days.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | April 4, 2012
Ever since Pinterest hit big, we've been buildling up a few Pinterest boards. The biggest board is called Make this for Gorelick . Now, when I see a tempting recipe on cool sites like Serious Eats or The Kitchn , I have somewhere to pin them. Have a look. And if you want to help build up this board, let me know. I'll add your name to the board's contributors. There are more Baltimore Sun Pinterest boards you can follow here .  
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | February 5, 2013
R. Gayle Layfield, a retired Friends School official who worked in fundraising, died of cancer Feb. 1 at her North Baltimore home. She was 64. Born Ruth Gayle Layfield in Richmond, Va., she was a 1966 graduate of the Collegiate School, where she was class president and played sports. She earned a bachelor of arts degree at Hollins College, where she was active on the trustee and alumnae boards. She also received a master's degree from the Johns Hopkins University. After moving to Baltimore in the mid-1970s, she was an English teacher at Roland Park Country School, where she was also director of admissions and worked in development.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | August 20, 2014
A city councilman is questioning a $1.6 million deal for a St. Louis company to provide prescription drugs to city workers, arguing that the work should go to local pharmacies. City Councilman Robert W. Curran said St. Louis-based Express Scripts, which holds a multimillion-dollar contract to provide prescription drug benefits to Baltimore City employees, has engaged in "deceptive practices," including overbilling the city for prescription drugs a decade ago. "Express Scripts did shortchange us," Curran told the city's spending panel Wednesday morning during a pre-meeting in a City Hall conference room.
NEWS
August 19, 2014
If Baltimore County residents had any doubts about the wisdom of moving toward a hybrid appointed/elected school board rather than the all-appointed version we have now, they were likely erased last week when the board voted to hand Superintendent Dallas Dance what amounts to a $27,000 raise. Not only did the board employ what is at best linguistic sleight of hand to provide Mr. Dance a bigger raise than his contract would allow, but it also shut down any public discussion of whether the raise was warranted.
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