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By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,Sun Staff Writer | August 25, 1995
Bell Atlantic Corp. will disband the outside boards of directors of its state operating companies, including Bell Atlantic-Maryland, and replace them with all-employee boards, a company spokesman said yesterday.The board of the Philadelphia-based parent company will continue to have outside directors.The state-level boards will disband at the end of the year, said spokesman Jay Grossman.The change does little more than ratify a trend toward centralized operations of the telephone company.
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NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | April 21, 2014
The Anne Arundel County school board has postponed its Wednesday announcement of its new superintendent, saying it needs additional time to negotiate a contract and perform background checks. School board president Teresa Birge said Monday the board decided before mapping out its agenda for Wednesday's meeting that it wasn't ready to announce the decision. She declined to say whether the board had chosen the superintendent. After receiving 55 applicants in February, the board last month narrowed down its selection to three finalists: George Arlotto, school system chief of staff; Maureen McMahon, assistant superintendent for advanced studies and programs; and Francisco Durán, superintendent of Trenton Public Schools in New Jersey.
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NEWS
By Laurie Willis and Laurie Willis,SUN STAFF | May 7, 2002
The scene plays out routinely in Baltimore Circuit Court: A defendant shows up late for an arraignment and tells an irate judge he was across the street at the "other" courthouse by mistake. Or the defendant insists he was in the right building all along - but got lost. With the Clarence M. Mitchell Jr. Courthouse on the west side of Calvert Street and Courthouse East across from it - not to mention 35 courtrooms spread out over several floors in both buildings - it's no wonder people show up late for court on a daily basis.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | April 18, 2014
Else Drooff says you can learn a lot about how government works as a student member of the Anne Arundel County school board. On Wednesday, the Broadneck High School senior, who is nearing the end of her one-year term, offered a glimpse into being a member on the only local school board in the nation where students have full voting rights. School board member-elect Ayesha Chaudhry was more than willing to listen. "You definitely have to find your own leadership style," said Drooff during an impromptu sit-down with Chaudhry at the school board offices.
NEWS
By Caitlin Francke and Caitlin Francke,SUN STAFF | August 29, 1998
The Baltimore and state election boards now say they have time to remove Sen. Clarence W. Blount's name from voting machines before the Democratic primary.Blount lost a suit in court on Wednesday filed against him by Del. Frank D. Boston Jr., a candidate for Blount's Senate seat. An Anne Arundel County Circuit judge ruled that Blount did not live in West Baltimore's 41st Legislative District and should not be on the ballot for his Senate seat. Blount has appealed that ruling.The boards had originally argued in the case that Blount's name could not be removed from the ballot in time for the Sept.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | November 10, 2001
WASHINGTON - The tapes Doug Collins had watched of the Golden State Warriors showed a team that reflected the playing personality of its coach, Dave Cowens. In the 10 years he spent with the Boston Celtics, Cowens was one of the best rebounders in the NBA. "If we don't match them on the boards," Collins said an hour before last night's game, "we'll get overrun." The tapes didn't lie, and the Wizards didn't work. It proved to be a difficult combination at the sold-out MCI Center, where the Warriors dominated the boards at both ends and Michael Jordan, showing his age for longer stretches than at any time this season, dominated at neither.
NEWS
By David Nitkin and David Nitkin,SUN STAFF | February 15, 2003
The victor may get the spoils, but the losers aren't faring too badly in Maryland this year. Some prominent Democratic politicians left jobless after last year's election received consolation prizes yesterday when Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. unwrapped the first batch of appointments to the hundreds of boards his administration will fill. The state's first Republican governor in 36 years named former House Speaker Casper R. Taylor Jr. to the Maryland Health Care Commission, and former Prince George's County Executive Wayne K. Curry to the state Port Commission.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN STAFF | May 6, 1998
Baltimore's officialdom gathered on a blighted block on the city's west side yesterday and celebrated something it usually doesn't brag about: how to better board up a vacant rowhouse.With television cameras rolling, Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke drove home a screw to secure a door-sized piece of plywood to the front of 3007 W. North Ave., a three-story brick house that is one of 13 vacant dwellings on the block. Two are occupied.The idea was not to highlight urban decay -- though the mayor acknowledged that the strip of crumbling, Victorian-era structures should be demolished.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | October 5, 2013
Dr. Clementine L. "Clem" Kaufman, a former social worker and volunteer who also served for years on numerous boards throughout the community and worked tirelessly for social justice, died of cancer Sept. 23 at Roland Park Place. She was 89. "She was a phenomenal person, and I got to know her when she was one of then-President Michael Hooker's assistants," said Freeman A. Hrabowski III, current president of the University of Maryland, Baltimore County and a longtime friend. "She always cared about social justice issues, and she worked hard to connect us to those initiatives in the city.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | May 3, 1997
WASHINGTON -- The National Association of Securities Dealers may get a recommendation to eliminate the boards of directors of its two subsidiaries in an attempt to streamline decision-making at the industry body, NASD's new top executive, Frank G. Zarb, said yesterday.That is a reversal for Zarb, who has repeatedly denied he might propose removal of the Nasdaq stock market and broker-regulatory boards.Yesterday Zarb, a former aide to Presidents Richard M. Nixon and Gerald R. Ford who has headed NASD for two months, said elimination of these boards is the most dramatic of three options he might recommend to the parent body's board June 26."
NEWS
April 17, 2014
Once again, the Baltimore City Public Schools are facing a multi-million dollar budget shortfall ( "Seeing red over city schools budget," April 15). Unfortunately, this is not a new occurrence, but what is stunning to me this time is the reaction of the Baltimore City Board of School Commissioners. The commissioners express surprise and "wonder" that the system got to this point. Let's consider some of the items that caused this surprise - grant funds that always have expiration dates, the highly-touted new facilities plan that will require at least $20 million per year for the foreseeable future and the new teacher evaluation system which calls for an unknowable expenditures for teacher performance.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | April 16, 2014
Baltimore's liquor board commissioners said Wednesday they've hired an experienced administrator to run the troubled agency. Michelle Bailey-Hedgepeth, the town administrator of Capitol Heights in Prince George's County, will become the first woman to head Baltimore's liquor board in its 80-year history, commissioners said. Bailey-Hedgepeth is scheduled to start work as the agency's executive secretary, as the position is known, by June 1. She replaces Samuel T. Daniels Jr., the board's longtime executive secretary, who announced his retirement last year.
NEWS
April 14, 2014
City school officials facing a $31 million budget shortfall next year have proposed dipping into the system's rainy day fund to close the gap. But that's not what those dollars are supposed to be for. The whole point of setting aside emergency funds is to cushion the impact of major unanticipated disruptions, from natural disasters to sudden economic crises. They're not a backstop for the kind of foreseeable, year-to-year budgetary ups and downs that ought to be part of the routine planning process, and using them that way would set a terrible precedent for the future.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | April 14, 2014
Hereford High School parents aren't giving up on their quest to keep their school's current schedule, and they filed a legal petition Monday with the Baltimore County school board. The parents, who have mounted months of protests, say Superintendent Dallas Dance's decision to standardize schedules in the county was arbitrary and based on faulty data. They want it overturned. "We expect a change, and we are not backing down," said Adam Spence, an attorney and parent of a Hereford High student, who is working pro bono and filed the legal documents.
NEWS
April 14, 2014
While The Baltimore Sun attempted to summarize the "more than 2,600 bills" considered by Maryland's General Assembly which adjourned this week in Annapolis ( "Minimum-wage hike, new marijuana laws approved as session ends," April 8), it failed to even mention legislation currently en route to Gov. Martin O'Malley's desk that addresses an increasing crime in Maryland. The bill (House Bill 1015), sponsored for the third consecutive year by Montgomery County Del. Sam Arora, penalizes Maryland's increasing number of persons convicted of alcohol-impaired driving while transporting a child with the mandatory installation of ignition interlocks in the offenders' motor vehicles.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | April 13, 2014
A slowdown in revenue has Baltimore school officials scrambling for budget adjustments that won't require the system to raid its rainy-day fund or cut central office positions and school programs. Officials face a $31 million deficit in next year's budget, due to factors that include a dried up stream of grant funding, fluctuating financial commitments and a halt to rapid growth in enrollment. Now, the school board has asked administrators to come up with alternatives to their proposed budget reductions, which included staff layoffs, breaking contracts and cutbacks to summer school.
NEWS
December 31, 2011
As the founder of property Taxpayers United, Baltimore County, I've followed closely the progress - or lack of it - at the Maryland State Department of Assessments and Taxation ("Marylanders face long waits in assessment appeals," Dec. 27). Quite frankly, I've grown tired of appeals board administrator Kent Finkelsen's excuses for not handling cases more expeditiously. I've had some good experiences helping fellow homeowners protest unfair reassessments at the Baltimore and Montgomery county appeals boards.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | April 4, 2012
Ever since Pinterest hit big, we've been buildling up a few Pinterest boards. The biggest board is called Make this for Gorelick . Now, when I see a tempting recipe on cool sites like Serious Eats or The Kitchn , I have somewhere to pin them. Have a look. And if you want to help build up this board, let me know. I'll add your name to the board's contributors. There are more Baltimore Sun Pinterest boards you can follow here .  
NEWS
By Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | April 10, 2014
The city liquor board has agreed to let the owner of Club Voltage keep his liquor license, reversing an earlier ruling, on the condition that he not open a bar at the same Southeast Baltimore location. The Board of Liquor License Commissioners said Thursday that owner Louis J. Principio III could keep the potentially lucrative license as long as he does not use it at the site of the huge dance club at the Baltimore Travel Plaza on O'Donnell Street. The board revoked the license in March after complaints about the club inside the old Greyhound bus terminal, including a Dec. 2 shooting on the dance floor.
NEWS
By Larry Perl, lperl@tribune.com | April 9, 2014
The Baltimore City Commission for Historical and Architectural Preservation on Tuesday approved a developer's exterior renovation plans for the conversion of an historic former home for unwed mothers into apartments. CHAP voted 6-1 to approve staff recommendations endorsing the renovation of the mansion, the old Florence Crittenton Home for Girls at 3110 Crittenton Place in Hampden. Developer John Brooks wants to convert the house into 14 apartments, plus one in a nearby cottage.
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