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By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | August 14, 2011
When Khalek Kirkland and one of his college buddies imagined their dream jobs, they wanted to be in charge of schools where they had students for enough hours in the day to change the course of their lives. Kirkland got that job this summer as head of the SEED School, a public boarding school that serves at-risk kids from 18 of Maryland's 24 jurisdictions. "SEED is the dream job," Kirkland said. But Kirkland, 39, also understands that dreams can come with challenges. The New Yorker, who has moved his wife and two small children into a dormitory on the campus, is being viewed as the man who can put the school on the right path after several difficult years.
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NEWS
By Xiaohui Wu | August 3, 2014
As a foreigner in the United States, one question I've often been asked by newly-met friends has been "What do you find special about America?" I always have a good answer for that question: "Education. " American children have colorful lives while their Chinese peers are locked up in studies. Surprisingly, many of my American friends are not as optimistic about the American system. In fact, they've told me it's the U.S. education system that's problematic and perhaps should learn from the Chinese system.
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NEWS
By John Fritze and John Fritze,Sun reporter | October 4, 2007
Southwestern High School, a huge former city school campus near Gwynns Falls Park, will become a public boarding school for up to 400 disadvantaged students under a lease agreement approved yesterday by the city's Board of Estimates. The nonprofit SEED Foundation, which runs a similar school in Washington, hopes to open the Baltimore school with 80 students in 2008. The students, in grades six through 12, will live on campus during the week and receive college preparatory coursework and counseling.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | June 17, 2014
Days after the federal government abandoned plans to house immigrant children in a Baltimore office building, the Obama administration has begun to explore other sites in Maryland, including one in Prince George's County, documents obtained by The Baltimore Sun show. On Tuesday, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services evaluated a former residential drug treatment facility in Upper Marlboro with a storied past as the administration struggles to find enough shelter space to contain the recent surge in unaccompanied children crossing the nation's Southwest border.
NEWS
By Gina Davis and Gina Davis,sun reporter | November 28, 2007
The 140-year-old Oldfields School could be forced to close in less than two years if officials are unable to raise at least an additional $1 million annually, according to a recent letter seeking financial support from graduates and families. "We have come to a crossroad in Oldfields' history," Dede Alexandre LeComte, head of the school's trustee board and a 1972 graduate, wrote in the letter. "If our financial condition remains unaltered, the future of the school after June 2009 is in serious question."
NEWS
By a Sun reporter | April 19, 2008
Financially troubled Oldfields School in Glencoe has named as its new head an educator who served there for 18 years in the 1970s and 1980s. Taylor Smith, the girls boarding school's new leader, was assistant head at Oldfields before he left in 1988 to run York Country Day School in York, Pa. After 12 years in York, he joined Episcopal High School in Jacksonville, Fla., where he is the associate head and director of college counseling. He takes over as Oldfields is working to shore up its finances.
NEWS
By Tanika White and Tanika White,Sun reporter | May 18, 2008
The lucky ones heard their numbers called early. Not only could those first-announced winners beam with pride about being one of the first 80 students who will attend the SEED School of Maryland, but they also did not have to agonize in their chairs any longer, watching the white lottery balls tumble in gilded cages - the numbered balls representing dreams for all and disappointment for many. Yesterday morning, the founders of the nation's first public boarding school, which opened 10 years ago in Washington, D.C., held the inaugural lottery to fill the slots for the Baltimore-based second location, which will open its doors in August to disadvantaged youths from all over the state.
NEWS
By JILL ROSEN and JILL ROSEN,SUN REPORTER | March 3, 2006
Durrell Lewis, in his navy blazer and tie and his big plans for college, told state lawmakers yesterday that he is living proof of why Maryland needs a public boarding school. Lewis, a senior at Washington's SEED School, the nation's first boarding program for at-risk youths, urged a House committee to pass a bill that would pave the way for a second school in Baltimore. Safe at the boarding school, Lewis said, he was able to forget about the perils of the street and concentrate on his education.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | June 10, 2013
A 13-year-old boy is alleging he was sexually assaulted by other students at the SEED School of Maryland, a public boarding school for at-risk children in Southwest Baltimore. Police confirmed that they were investigating the incident, which is alleged to have occurred in a dormitory May 28. The boy told his parents about it on June 4, according to police, who declined to release other details and withheld the incident report. Students stay at the school in dorms from Sunday afternoon to Friday afternoon, living with support staff.
NEWS
By LIZ BOWIE and LIZ BOWIE,SUN REPORTER | January 17, 2006
Any number of Baltimore teachers have pondered what might happen if they could take some students out of their rough neighborhoods and give their minds a chance to grow. What if the students didn't have homeboys selling drugs in front of their houses? What if their mothers were more dependable or their sisters didn't need baby-sitting? What if those distractions were removed and, instead, someone gave them a quiet place to study every night, provided nutritious food and assumed they would go to college?
NEWS
By R. Bennett Furlow | May 13, 2014
The kidnapping of 276 Nigerian school girls by the Boko Haram insurgency has finally drawn attention to the group's murderous, five-year-long crusade, which, unlike attacks by Islamist militants elsewhere, has largely focused on school children. In September of last year, Boko Haram raiders attacked a college dormitory at 1 a.m., killing 44 students and teachers. Last July they killed 42 people, mainly students, in a pre-dawn raid on a school. In February, they attacked a boarding school in northern Nigeria in the middle of the night, killing 59 boys.
NEWS
May 6, 2014
It's now been more than two weeks since Islamic militants attacked a girls' boarding school in remote northeast Nigeria and abducted more than 300 young women between the ages of 16 and 18, carrying them off into the bush on a convoy of buses and trucks. But apart from a few dozen students who managed to escape in the first few hours after their capture, not a trace of the girls has been found so far. And the kidnappings haven't stopped: Today U.N. officials announced that at least eight more girls were seized by extremists in the same part of the country as last month's abductions.
NEWS
By Jon Meoli, jmeoli@tribune.com | March 7, 2014
The Baltimore County Planning Board on Thursday gave its stamp of approval to the school board's $56.2 million capital budget request for fiscal year 2015, though it attached a caveat to a controversial school construction plan approved in the budget. In a memo to Baltimore County's Director of Budget and Finance Keith Dorsey, the Planning Board urged further discussions with stakeholders about the three-part central area elementary school overcrowding relief plan that, includes the closure of Halstead Academy in Hillendale.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | October 25, 2013
Mary K. McPherson, a retired private-school educator who had been on the faculty of Oldfields School and Bryn Mawr School, died Oct. 5 of cancer at Roland Park Place, where she had lived for the past decade. She was 89. Mary King McPherson was born and raised in Toronto, where she graduated from Havergal College, a private girls school. After earning a bachelor's degree from Trinity College, part of the University of Toronto, Miss McPherson served with the Women's Royal Canadian Service at Halifax, Nova Scotia, from 1944 to 1945.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Ethan Renner and For The Baltimore Sun | October 10, 2013
"When witches don't fight, we burn. " -- Fiona Goode If Bill Hader's Stefon from "Saturday Night Live" were to explain the season premiere of "American Horror Story," it might go something like this: "New Orleans' hottest club is 'Coven'. It has everything: an undead murderous socialite from the 1830s, a bloody shaving brush, a minotaur, stem cells, cocaine and witches. "  "American Horror Story" is back, and it's just as crazy as you remember it. We open the episode in 1834, where we are introduced to Delphine, a New Orleans socialite, who has thrown a party in an effort to round up some suitors for her three daughters.
SPORTS
By Childs Walker, The Baltimore Sun and By Childs Walker, The Baltimore Sun | September 19, 2013
It's a gorgeous September afternoon, and students at the SEED School of Baltimore are spending it just like countless peers across the country - donning their home colors to play a game of football. Classmates drift across campus to watch, sitting beside proud parents. It's a slice of Americana in the heart of Southwest Baltimore. This scene would not be possible without Ed Reed. Reed's foundation donated the money to start a football program at SEED, a public boarding school for at-risk youths on the former campus of Southwestern High.
SPORTS
By Childs Walker, The Baltimore Sun and By Childs Walker, The Baltimore Sun | September 19, 2013
It's a gorgeous September afternoon, and students at the SEED School of Baltimore are spending it just like countless peers across the country - donning their home colors to play a game of football. Classmates drift across campus to watch, sitting beside proud parents. It's a slice of Americana in the heart of Southwest Baltimore. This scene would not be possible without Ed Reed. Reed's foundation donated the money to start a football program at SEED, a public boarding school for at-risk youths on the former campus of Southwestern High.
NEWS
By Howard Libit and Howard Libit,SUN STAFF | October 25, 2001
COLORA - Tucked away in the rolling farmland of Cecil County sits a little-known secondary school that holds a unique title in American education: the oldest boarding school in the United States. Founded in 1744 by an Irish Presbyterian minister, West Nottingham Academy boasts a proud roster of alumni, including three former governors, two signers of the Declaration of Independence - Benjamin Rush and Richard Stockton - and well-known modern artist Eric Fischl. "The timeline alone for the school is just incredible," says Peter Fender of Baltimore, a 1964 graduate and member of West Nottingham's board of trustees.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | September 16, 2013
Julia Andree Delbourgo, who hid from the Nazis in wartime France and, after immigrating to the U.S. with her family, taught French in Baltimore private schools, died of cancer Sept. 7 at Gilchrist Hospice Care in Towson. The longtime Pikesville resident was 85. The daughter of a wealthy businessman and a dealer in Egyptian antiquities, the former Julia Andree Menache - she never used her first name - was born and raised in Paris. Her parents divorced when she an infant, and she did not met her father until she was 18, when, after the end of World War II, she was brought to Alexandria, Egypt, to live with her family.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | June 10, 2013
A 13-year-old boy is alleging he was sexually assaulted by other students at the SEED School of Maryland, a public boarding school for at-risk children in Southwest Baltimore. Police confirmed that they were investigating the incident, which is alleged to have occurred in a dormitory May 28. The boy told his parents about it on June 4, according to police, who declined to release other details and withheld the incident report. Students stay at the school in dorms from Sunday afternoon to Friday afternoon, living with support staff.
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