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Board S Decision

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NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,Staff Writer | October 27, 1993
A Baltimore County Circuit judge yesterday ordered the county Board of Appeals and the Liquor Board to stop deliberating in private and obey the state's open-meetings law. But she refused to reverse the decision that led to the injunction.Judge Barbara Kerr Howe said the county could not "pick and choose when to obey the law" and called the defenses it raised "a tempest in a teapot in an attempt to justify the actions taken by the [Appeals] Board."Maryland law calls for open meetings in zoning and other licensing matters.
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NEWS
By Brent Jones and Brent Jones,Sun reporter | April 18, 2008
The city liquor board will not renew the license for the owner of Linden Bar and Liquors, a long-time corner establishment in the 900 block of W. North Ave. that police say is the scene of nightly drug activity and violence. Residents of nearby Reservoir Hill flooded the hearing at City Hall yesterday and were relieved at the board's decision. But the attorney for Chang K. Yim, who has owned the liquor store since 2003, argued that his client could be a victim of gentrification, and that Kim has tried to appease neighborhood fears by installing lights outside the store and fixing video cameras inside the building.
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NEWS
By JILL HUDSON NEAL and JILL HUDSON NEAL,SUN STAFF | June 3, 1998
The Howard County Zoning Board approved yesterday the Rouse Co.'s revised plan to build a Columbia-style village in North Laurel, but ordered the developer to make more changes to cushion the impact of the project.Rouse said it accepts the terms of the board's decision. The developer must now submit a detailed sketch plan to the county planning board."We can live with the [board's] decision," said Alton J. Scavo, Rouse senior vice president. "We now just have to wait and go through the long, long processing period."
NEWS
By Liz Bowie and Andrew A. Green and Liz Bowie and Andrew A. Green,SUN REPORTERS | December 12, 2007
Maryland's state school board defied warnings by legislative leaders and voted in private yesterday afternoon to renew schools Superintendent Nancy S. Grasmick's contract for another four years. The decision, made after a three-hour executive session in Baltimore, immediately drew angry threats from legislative leaders in Annapolis, setting up the possibility of a long battle between the state board and the General Assembly over who will direct education policy. House Speaker Michael E. Busch and Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller had sent a letter to the board Monday urging it not to reappoint Grasmick.
NEWS
By Jill Hudson Neal and Jill Hudson Neal,SUN STAFF | September 17, 1998
A powerful advocacy group representing citizens and community organizations in the North Laurel, Savage and Fulton areas will appeal the Howard County Zoning Board's decision to allow the Rouse Co. to build a controversial Columbia-style village in North Laurel.Greg Fries, chairman of the Southern Howard Land Use Committee, said the group will file an appeal to the county Circuit Court by the end of the month.In February, the Zoning Board -- which comprises the five members of the County Council -- approved rezoning the property from employment to mixed use.After months of contentious public hearings, the board handed down its decision in June, giving Rouse the go-ahead to build a mixed-use development that would have 1,201 residential units, 89 acres of commercial space and 182 acres of open space on 516 acres straddling Interstate 95.Fries said the appeal will attempt to show that Rouse failed to meet strict legal criteria for the zoning change and that the majority of the Zoning Board failed to correctly interpret the law."
NEWS
By Ryan Davis and Ryan Davis,SUN STAFF | February 9, 2003
More than two months after the Annapolis Symphony Orchestra opted not to renew the contract of its first African-American musical director, the three black members of the Annapolis city council plan to introduce a resolution tomorrow that chastises the symphony. It begins by commending director Leslie B. Dunner and noting that February is Black History Month. It ends by stating that the city council wishes to formally express "its displeasure over the decision." "I think the facts speak for themselves," said Alderman George O. Kelley, one of the three sponsors.
NEWS
By Laura Cadiz and Laura Cadiz,SUN STAFF | January 26, 2004
The Columbia Association board of directors agrees with Del. Shane E. Pendergrass that the association needs a 10 percent ceiling on rising property assessments, but it doesn't want the state to make CA impose one. Backsliding from its original position of supporting Pendergrass' effort to require the 10 percent cap, the board has decided it wants Pendergrass to change her legislation to allow - not force - the association to use a cap. In a 6-4 decision...
NEWS
By Laura Loh and Laura Loh,SUN STAFF | January 28, 2004
Anne Arundel County's school board - stung by criticism that it privately approved raises for 30 high-level administrators, including Superintendent Eric J. Smith - is considering a policy change that would require it to take a public vote before adjusting salaries for any group of employees. The board's decision to grant 1 percent midyear raises to Smith and his senior staff has been questioned in recent weeks by County Council members, who are reviewing a board request to appropriate nearly $1.9 million in school funds for cost-of-living raises for about 8,000 employees.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | January 9, 2005
A Maryland attorney general's opinion appears to back the Howard County school board's decision to close the personnel hearing on the firing of Bruce M. Venter, the school system's former chief business officer, who had fought to open it to the public. The opinion from Attorney General J. Joseph Curran Jr., issued Wednesday, concluded that the hearing is a "quasi judicial function" that is not subject to the state's Open Meetings Act. Despite Venter's request that the hearing be open, the opinion said, "the request may be denied if the county board can identify an interest (its own or a third party's)
NEWS
July 2, 2006
THE ISSUE: Last week, the referendum issue on the "Comp Lite" omnibus zoning bill was likely knocked off November's election ballot by a court decision that county election board members declined to challenge. The state's second-highest court found that petitions signed by more than 7,000 people provided too little information about the zoning bill for people to be fully informed about what they were signing. What do you think about this ruling, the election board's decision not to challenge it, and what voters should do now?
NEWS
By Lynn Anderson and Lynn Anderson,Sun reporter | August 17, 2007
Baltimore's liquor board dismissed charges of numerous violations against an Upper Fells Point bar yesterday, suggesting that its top employee had unfairly treated the establishment's owners by keeping the bar closed for six months before filing charges. Club Eldorado had been alleged to be in violation of multiple state liquor regulations, including having been closed for years and then recently reopened by brothers who were using a liquor license held by a man they didn't know. State law requires that a "licensee shall be the actual owner and operator of the business conducted on the licensed premises."
NEWS
By Chris Guy | June 2, 2007
Lawyers for a New-Jersey development firm seeking approval of a 1,350-unit waterfront community on Kent Island filed court papers yesterday notifying the state Board of Public Works the firm will appeal a recent ruling that denied a crucial permit for the Four Seasons project. The one-page petition for judicial review, filed in Queen Anne's County Circuit Court, starts an administrative appeal process in which the state has up to 60 days to respond and the company has 30 days to file documents outlining its complaint, said John H. Zink III, a Towson attorney who represents K. Hovnanian, which has worked for nearly a decade to win regulatory approval.
NEWS
By [by a sun reporter] | February 14, 2007
Delay. That best sums up the time since a luxury, 23-story residential and retail complex in downtown Columbia was approved. The succeeding 13 months have been filled with appeals, hearings, testimony, exhibits and more appeals. Now, just as it was preparing to decide whether a challenge to the tower could proceed, the Board of Appeals chose to -- postpone. Confronted with a two-pronged attack that, if successful, could render further board action on the tower useless and perhaps illegal, the panel concluded Monday night that delaying until a court ruling was the most prudent strategy.
NEWS
by a sun reporter | November 5, 2006
Even after suffering a resounding defeat in their challenge to the Planning Board's approval of an expansion of Turf Valley, a luxury resort and planned community, opponents vowed their fight is far from over. The Board of Appeals unanimously turned back the multi-pronged attack, saying to do otherwise in the face of the facts would be "arbitrary and capricious." Louis Mangione, vice president of the owner and developer of Turf Valley, Mangione Family Enterprises, praised the board's vote Thursday night.
BUSINESS
By Hanah Cho and Hanah Cho,Sun reporter | October 4, 2006
The National Labor Relations Board issued a decision yesterday that experts say expands the definition of who can be considered a supervisor. The ruling in Washington could have far-reaching implications for trade unions and at workplaces around the country. The federal panel ruled 3-2 that permanent charge nurses at hospitals should be categorized as supervisors, meaning they would not be covered by the National Labor Relations Act and would be barred from joining a union. The long-awaited NLRB decision involved nurses at Oakwood Health Care in Michigan.
NEWS
July 2, 2006
THE ISSUE: Last week, the referendum issue on the "Comp Lite" omnibus zoning bill was likely knocked off November's election ballot by a court decision that county election board members declined to challenge. The state's second-highest court found that petitions signed by more than 7,000 people provided too little information about the zoning bill for people to be fully informed about what they were signing. What do you think about this ruling, the election board's decision not to challenge it, and what voters should do now?
NEWS
By Doug Donovan and Doug Donovan,SUN STAFF | August 30, 2003
A city employee filed assault charges Thursday against the president of a group that advocates for minority-owned companies seeking government contracts, according to Baltimore District Court records. Jeffrey D. Mullaney, a buyer with the city's Bureau of Purchases, accused Wayne R. Frazier Sr. of punching him in City Hall on Wednesday, according to court documents. Mullaney alleges that a scuffle occurred after the Board of Estimates decided to re-bid a lighting contract -- worth nearly $1 million -- on which a minority-owned company was low bidder.
NEWS
November 18, 1992
Unhappiness over the Carroll County school board's decision to give Superintendent R. Edward Shilling a pay raise this summer has boiled over into an effort to strip the board of some of its powers. Members of Carroll's State House delegation will be discussing whether the board should have its budgetary responsibilities reduced.At issue is the board's accountability. The school board is not seen as a fiscally responsible body. Its decision to enter into a four-year contract with the superintendent with automatic pay increases has come back to haunt it.Teachers, angered they didn't get any cost-of-living increases this year, and citizens, feeling that the superintendent is already well compensated, don't believe the board can properly manage its budget.
NEWS
By TYRONE RICHARDSON AND LAURA CADIZ and TYRONE RICHARDSON AND LAURA CADIZ,SUN REPORTERS | June 16, 2006
After being repeatedly berated by a standing-room-only crowd of angry residents, a besieged Columbia Association board has reversed its decision to close a popular Lake Elkhorn tot lot. The board rescinded its recent decision after the testimony of dozens of residents who were among a crowd of more than 100 that filled the board room and foyer at the association headquarters Wednesday night. The residents made it clear to the 10-member board that its vote June 8 was done in haste and without adequate resident input.
NEWS
By LYNN ANDERSON and LYNN ANDERSON,SUN REPORTER | June 16, 2006
The Baltimore liquor board reversed yesterday a decision it made in August to void the liquor license of a Ridgely's Delight tavern owner. The board's reversal amounts to a concession that it had misinterpreted state law when it voided James C. Quigley's license. At a hearing in August, board members said they had no choice under the law but to void a license that had been pending transfer for 180 days or more. Quigley's license had been in such a state for about three years because of construction delays.
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