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NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN STAFF | November 19, 1996
This week calls will go out to the famous and obscure alike to serve on a wide-ranging review board that will delve into the Naval Academy's operations, from ethics to military training.Among the names being talked about to serve on the 18- to 20-member board are retired Army Gen. Colin L. Powell and former National Security Adviser Brent Scowcroft. The panel also is expected to include recent academy graduates, representatives from business, the media, the U.S. Military Academy at West Point and the Air Force Academy in Colorado Springs.
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NEWS
By Bradley Olson and Bradley Olson,Sun reporter | September 21, 2005
WASHINGTON -- Sen. Barbara A. Mikulski yesterday questioned top U.S. Naval Academy leaders about why problems with sexual harassment have persisted at their institution despite numerous investigations and recommendations over the past 15 years. "This seems like deja vu all over again," Mikulski, a Maryland Democrat, said at a meeting of the academy's Board of Visitors, a supervisory group made up of members of Congress and presidential appointees. Citing a 1990 incident in which a woman midshipman was handcuffed to a urinal and photographed by male mids, Mikulski asked the academy to review how past recommendations have been implemented, and which attempts to make the academy a more hospitable place for women have worked better than others.
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NEWS
By Ariel Sabar and Ariel Sabar,SUN STAFF | March 5, 2002
The board that oversees the Naval Academy is taking on a Republican cast. President Bush made his first appointments Friday to the academy's board of visitors, filling slots that had been held by Clinton appointees with GOP activists, a former Reagan administration official and a Texas businessman who has donated tens of thousands of dollars to Bush campaigns. The appointments are the latest in a sea change in leadership at the military college, which named a new commandant of midshipmen in January and is expected to name a new superintendent in the next few weeks.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | March 9, 2004
WASHINGTON - President Bush nominated yesterday the former commander of U.S. Naval Forces in Europe to serve as a member of the Naval Academy's Board of Visitors and a top Harvard University official to another term. Retired Adm. Leighton Smith Jr., a 1962 academy graduate who once served as commander in chief of U.S. Naval Forces in Europe, is a new nominee to the board; current member J. Bonnie Newman, executive dean of Harvard's John F. Kennedy School of Government, is being nominated to another term on the advisory board.
NEWS
By Bradley Olson and Bradley Olson,Sun reporter | September 21, 2005
WASHINGTON -- Sen. Barbara A. Mikulski yesterday questioned top U.S. Naval Academy leaders about why problems with sexual harassment have persisted at their institution despite numerous investigations and recommendations over the past 15 years. "This seems like deja vu all over again," Mikulski, a Maryland Democrat, said at a meeting of the academy's Board of Visitors, a supervisory group made up of members of Congress and presidential appointees. Citing a 1990 incident in which a woman midshipman was handcuffed to a urinal and photographed by male mids, Mikulski asked the academy to review how past recommendations have been implemented, and which attempts to make the academy a more hospitable place for women have worked better than others.
NEWS
By Neal Thompson and Neal Thompson,SUN STAFF | January 16, 1998
Seven months after a committee called for improvements at the Naval Academy, the Pentagon says it is working toward implementing the committee's 16 recommendations, although the overhaul will take time, money and congressional approval.Navy Secretary John H. Dalton wrote in a recent report that efforts to create a stronger military presence at the academy, to ensure tighter oversight by the board of visitors, to be more open to the news media and to give women and minorities more opportunities "will go far in making a great institution even better."
NEWS
By Neal Thompson and Neal Thompson,SUN STAFF | January 16, 1998
Seven months after a committee called for improvements at (( the Naval Academy, the Pentagon says it is working toward implementing every one of the committee's 16 recommendations, though the overhaul will take time, money and congressional approval.Navy Secretary John H. Dalton wrote in a recent report that efforts to create a stronger military presence at the academy, ensure tighter oversight by the board of visitors, be more open to the media and give women and minorities more opportunities "will go far in making a great institution even better."
NEWS
October 4, 1996
CREATION OF AN outside panel to conduct a broad assessment of the U.S. Naval Academy is a welcome development. Buffeted by a number of scandals -- including drug use, sexual misconduct and car thefts -- the academy's reputation is in need of rehabilitation. A thorough review is an excellent start.As envisioned by the academy's Board of Visitors, military and civilian experts will explore all aspects of academy life, from admissions policies to the treatment of female midshipmen. The assessment should be able to pinpoint problems that need addressing, as well as put to rest misconceptions that the officers' training school has been overrun with irresponsible youth.
NEWS
May 15, 1996
THE U.S. Naval Academy's Board of Visitors seems to be of two minds about whether "systemic" problems bedevil the historic institution. While professing that the "jury is still out" about a widespread breakdown in discipline among midshipmen, the institution's civilian advisory panel this week clearly acknowledged that something is amiss in Annapolis by calling for more stringent standards of admission and discipline.After the board's unusual eight-hour closed meeting Monday -- which would have given the public more confidence had it been held in the open -- retired Adm. Benjamin Montoya said he did not hear evidence to support allegations that the country's Naval Academy is suffering from "institutional decay."
ENTERTAINMENT
By SLOANE BROWN | May 5, 2002
You could say everyone -- all 1,600 of them -- at the "2001 Shock Trauma Gala" was in uniform. Perusing the cocktail hour crowd in the Baltimore Convention Center mezzanine, you could see folks in dress uniform of the police, firefighter and emergency medical technician variety. And then you had the "uniform" for everyone else -- tuxedos and a variety of glittering gowns. All were there for one uniform purpose -- to honor Maryland's emergency personnel in the annual event subtitled "A Night for Heroes."
ENTERTAINMENT
By SLOANE BROWN | May 5, 2002
You could say everyone -- all 1,600 of them -- at the "2001 Shock Trauma Gala" was in uniform. Perusing the cocktail hour crowd in the Baltimore Convention Center mezzanine, you could see folks in dress uniform of the police, firefighter and emergency medical technician variety. And then you had the "uniform" for everyone else -- tuxedos and a variety of glittering gowns. All were there for one uniform purpose -- to honor Maryland's emergency personnel in the annual event subtitled "A Night for Heroes."
SPORTS
December 9, 2001
Baseball ASTROS: Agreed to $2.35 million, two-year contract with former Orioles C Gregg Zaun. Signed C Scott Servais to minor-league contract. Added P Doug Brocail to 40-man roster. BRAVES: Agreed to $8 million, two-year contract with 3B Vinny Castilla. Basketball KNICKS: Announced resignation of coach Jeff Van Gundy. MAGIC: Placed F Grant Hill on injured list. College DIVISION II HALL OF FAME: Inducted three football players Santa Clara TE Brent Jones, Fort Valley State LB Greg Lloyd and California-Davis QB Ken O'Brien.
NEWS
By Laura Sullivan and Laura Sullivan,SUN STAFF | August 24, 2001
Naval Academy instructors and officials have begun to speculate this week on whether academy Superintendent Vice Adm. John R. Ryan would stay for another four years after his first term ends a year from now. After faculty members passed a resolution Tuesday saying Ryan has provided the school with "extraordinary leadership" and asking the vice admiral to stay, many senior officials are wondering if he might become the first superintendent in more than...
NEWS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,SUN STAFF | January 15, 2000
ADELPHI -- University System of Maryland officials asked yesterday that the state ethics commission reverse a decision that puts campus Boards of Visitors under ethics regulations. "We are adopting a two-pronged approach," said Leronia A. Josey, chairwoman of the advancement committee of the system's Board of Regents. "We passed a resolution calling on the full board to ask the ethics commission to reconsider this and, if that fails, for the legislature to take action." System officials said they are concerned that the ethics regulations -- which could require Boards of Visitors members to make full financial disclosure and prohibit them from doing business with the school -- might keep people from joining the Boards of Visitors.
NEWS
By Neal Thompson and Neal Thompson,SUN STAFF | January 16, 1998
Seven months after a committee called for improvements at the Naval Academy, the Pentagon says it is working toward implementing the committee's 16 recommendations, although the overhaul will take time, money and congressional approval.Navy Secretary John H. Dalton wrote in a recent report that efforts to create a stronger military presence at the academy, to ensure tighter oversight by the board of visitors, to be more open to the news media and to give women and minorities more opportunities "will go far in making a great institution even better."
NEWS
By Neal Thompson and Neal Thompson,SUN STAFF | January 16, 1998
Seven months after a committee called for improvements at (( the Naval Academy, the Pentagon says it is working toward implementing every one of the committee's 16 recommendations, though the overhaul will take time, money and congressional approval.Navy Secretary John H. Dalton wrote in a recent report that efforts to create a stronger military presence at the academy, ensure tighter oversight by the board of visitors, be more open to the media and give women and minorities more opportunities "will go far in making a great institution even better."
SPORTS
December 9, 2001
Baseball ASTROS: Agreed to $2.35 million, two-year contract with former Orioles C Gregg Zaun. Signed C Scott Servais to minor-league contract. Added P Doug Brocail to 40-man roster. BRAVES: Agreed to $8 million, two-year contract with 3B Vinny Castilla. Basketball KNICKS: Announced resignation of coach Jeff Van Gundy. MAGIC: Placed F Grant Hill on injured list. College DIVISION II HALL OF FAME: Inducted three football players Santa Clara TE Brent Jones, Fort Valley State LB Greg Lloyd and California-Davis QB Ken O'Brien.
NEWS
By Scott Wilson and Scott Wilson,SUN STAFF | June 24, 1997
The U.S. Naval Academy is "fundamentally sound," though its leaders need to change a confrontational approach to public relations that has aggravated past scandals, a special review board has concluded.The board's report, six months in the works, suggests 16 needed improvements. But it is essentially a glowing review of the academy and its superintendent, Adm. Charles R. Larson, who arrived three years ago charged with restoring the school's image.The committee's review clears the elite officer-training school of responsibility for an academic cheating scandal, car-theft ring, drug bust and sex-related crimes involving students in recent years.
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