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By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,Sun Staff Writer | August 30, 1995
The principal of one of Baltimore's troubled middle schools sat next to his boss yesterday and told the state Board of Education that his school "is not in physical condition to open" next week.Joseph Heaney, who was appointed principal of Calverton Middle School on July 12, ruefully described physical problems at the West Baltimore school, including arson damage from last spring that has yet to be repaired.While he reported to the board, which has ordered the school to improve or face takeover, Patricia E. Newby, deputy superintendent, sat next to Mr. Heaney, nodding occasionally.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | March 5, 2012
Joseph Klein Jr., a Baltimore insurance executive and philanthropist who believed in leading by example, died Sunday of pulmonary fibrosis at his Pikesville home. He was 80. The son of a co-founder of Levinson & Klein Inc., an East Baltimore furniture store, and a homemaker, Mr. Klein was born in Baltimore and raised in the Dumbarton neighborhood of Northwest Baltimore. Mr. Klein graduated in 1949 from Friends School, and in 1953 from the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania.
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NEWS
By Jean Thompson and Jean Thompson,SUN STAFF | May 31, 1997
J. Tyson Tildon, 65, an award-winning scientist and professor of pediatrics at the University of Maryland medical school, will be the chairman of the new nine-member Baltimore Board of School Commissioners."
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | August 18, 2011
Gwendolyn M. "Gwen" Bruggman, a homemaker and volunteer, died Aug. 9 from complications of a broken hip at Greater Baltimore Medical Center. The Brightwood resident was 84. The daughter of a businessman and a homemaker, the former Gwendolyn Medill was born in Baltimore and raised on Bolton Hill. After graduating from Notre Dame Preparatory School in 1945, she attended Washington College for a year. She was married in 1946 to G. Harry Bruggman, a manufacturers' representative, and lived for many years in Roland Park and Ruxton.
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | December 4, 1996
IT WAS LEGISLATED into existence 99 years ago to get ward politics out of education management. Now the Baltimore Board of School Commissioners is being disbanded in a political deal that will shift more management responsibility from city to state.Arnita Hicks McArthur, board president and a member since 1989, is surprisingly calm about the partial state takeover, given that the board's failure to improve the operation of the schools is implicit in the court-approved pact that will establish a new, more powerful board appointed jointly by the mayor and governor.
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | June 1, 1997
AH, THE EXCITED, smiling faces in Karl Merton Ferron's wonderful front-page photo in Wednesday's Sun: members of the brand new Baltimore school board and the mayor and governor who appointed them!There's something cleansing and renewing about starting from scratch when things are a mess, and that's what Baltimore has done with its school leadership. Treasure these spring days of 1997. For the first time in years, there's optimism about education in the city. A new Board of School Commissioners is at the helm, effective today, with a mandate to hire a powerful chief executive to replace Superintendent Walter G. Amprey and "turn the system around."
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | December 24, 1990
The Board of School Commissioners in a stunning show of Charter independence, did what it was told.Comrades. The resignation of the foreign minister carries the new political thinking entirely too far.
NEWS
By Kathy Lally | December 21, 1990
After deliberating for an hour at a secret location last night, Baltimore school board members did as Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke had told them and informed Richard C. Hunter, the superintendent, that his contract would not be renewed.Still resisting to the end, Dr. Hunter issued a statement acknowledging the board's authority but suggesting that its members change their minds. Thus came the denouement of a drama that began three years ago this month when Alice G. Pinderhughes, the previous superintendent, announced her retirement, quietly bowing to the wishes of the education-minded mayor who wanted his personal imprint on the schools.
NEWS
January 30, 1992
Heavy winds have been buffeting the Baltimore City Board of School Commissioners. City Council President Mary Pat Clarke wants to elect two-thirds of the nine-member body, while Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke talks of eliminating the board or of making it advisory. Meanwhile, the school board hardly distinguished itself by running away and hiding during the mayor's ill-advised effort to close the schools for a week to save money.Given all these cross-winds, it's refreshing that the mayor has performed a mid-winter housecleaning in the board nominations he sent to the City Council late last week -- and it's gratifying to see that a slate of considerable quality and diversity has agreed to serve in this largely thankless, totally unpaid capacity.
NEWS
February 24, 2008
In 1854, the Harford County Board of School Commissioners purchased land for the construction of Mount Horeb School, after the official establishment of public schools in Harford County on February 27, 1850. Evidence from the board's minutes shows that the school was built on one-fourth of an acre at a cost of $600. Mount Horeb, identified as school 10, 4th Election District, had a privy and benches instead of desks. In 1865, a state assessment of schools concluded that such a rural school was "destitute of everything that looks to comfort or convenience."
NEWS
March 11, 2008
Baltimore schools CEO Andres Alonso has come up with an ambitious reorganization plan that would shift more authority and financial responsibility from the central office to principals and their staffs. School-based management is hardly a radical idea. It is already being practiced in the city's nearly two dozen charter schools. But school administrators must give principals all the support they need if the plan is to succeed. Principals would gain increased authority to run their schools, deciding on everything from supplies to test preparation, under the proposal to be presented to the Board of School Commissioners today.
NEWS
February 24, 2008
In 1854, the Harford County Board of School Commissioners purchased land for the construction of Mount Horeb School, after the official establishment of public schools in Harford County on February 27, 1850. Evidence from the board's minutes shows that the school was built on one-fourth of an acre at a cost of $600. Mount Horeb, identified as school 10, 4th Election District, had a privy and benches instead of desks. In 1865, a state assessment of schools concluded that such a rural school was "destitute of everything that looks to comfort or convenience."
NEWS
August 17, 2007
Helen T. Johnston, a homemaker and former private-school board member, died Tuesday of cancer at Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care. The Pinehurst resident was 78. The former Helen Toulson was born in Baltimore and raised in Roland Park. She was a 1946 graduate of Roland Park Country School and earned a bachelor's degree in French from Russell Sage College. Mrs. Johnston, a longtime Pinehurst resident, had served on the board of Roland Park Country School for many years. She enjoyed reading, playing bridge and spending time at a second home in Eastville, Va. She often opened the historic 17th-century home for Virginia Garden Club tours.
NEWS
February 19, 2006
1870: Petition for school in Darlington Public education in Harford County had its beginnings in 1723, though it was not until 1865 that a "thorough and efficient system of free public education" was established by the Maryland legislature. After the first meeting of the Board of School Commissioners in July 1865, schoolhouses in Harford County quickly were built. They were numbered and divided among six districts. On Feb. 17, 1870, a petition was made for a new school in Darlington.
NEWS
By BRIAN D. MORRIS | October 14, 2005
Sound, well-equipped buildings and classrooms are essential complements to teaching and learning. For too long, Baltimore schools have suffered through antiquated buildings that no other school system in the state has had to endure. Our principals are spending too much of their time worrying about whether the heat or the lights are going to work when they come in to school in the morning. We have patched leaky roofs and jump-started faulty heating systems for so long we have come to accept these deficiencies as norms.
NEWS
May 16, 2004
WALTER SONDHEIM JR., 95, was president of the Baltimore City Board of School Commissioners when the school system desegregated in 1954 following the Supreme Court's decision in Brown vs. Board of Education. The following are excerpts from interviews he granted to Maryland Humanities, a publication of the Maryland Humanities Council, and The Sun. What happened with Brown vs. Board and the Baltimore City Board of School Commissioners was much less dramatic than I'd like to be able to say it was. First, there was no feeling that the decision was being rammed down our throats.
NEWS
February 19, 2006
1870: Petition for school in Darlington Public education in Harford County had its beginnings in 1723, though it was not until 1865 that a "thorough and efficient system of free public education" was established by the Maryland legislature. After the first meeting of the Board of School Commissioners in July 1865, schoolhouses in Harford County quickly were built. They were numbered and divided among six districts. On Feb. 17, 1870, a petition was made for a new school in Darlington.
NEWS
By Brenda J. Buote and Brenda J. Buote,SUN STAFF | May 14, 1997
How do you squeeze 933 students into a school that was built for 474?Use blackboards to divide each classroom in half, then seat students four to a desk and make them share textbooks.Such is the life of teachers at William Paca Elementary School in Southeast Baltimore.And things could get worse.The school, an open classroom building, is facing a $200,000 budget cut next year, said Yvonne M. Terry, the school principal. She and frustrated parents are calling on outgoing Baltimore schools Superintendent Walter G. Amprey to intervene.
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | December 14, 2003
THE OTHER night, members of the activist group ACORN (Association of Community Organizations for Reform Now) occupied the chairs of the city's nine appointed school board members and (until police removed them) declared themselves "the new board of the Baltimore City school system." ACORN's anger is understandable. The Board of School Commissioners shares the responsibility for the system's financial crisis and the resulting dismissal of more than 700 employees. And this board is far from a perfect cross section of Baltimore City.
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