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By LOUIS L. GOLDSTEIN | August 27, 1992
The Monday morning quarterback never throws too long, flubs a hand-off or gets sacked behind the lines. Of course, he never has the ultimate responsibility for the team's success or failure, either.The same is true for the armchair revenue estimators, who can predict revenue growth perfectly -- after the revenues have been collected.As chairman of the Board of Revenue Estimates, I'm one of three Sunday afternoon quarterbacks -- along with State Treasurer Lucille Maurer and Budget Secretary Charles Benton -- who have had the real responsibility of estimating revenues during an extremely unusual recession and major shifts in our nation's economy.
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NEWS
By Andrew A. Green and Andrew A. Green,SUN REPORTER | December 14, 2007
Maryland's tax collections are coming in on target this year, according to newly released state figures, but Board of Revenue Estimates members cautioned that the economic picture remains uncertain. The latest estimates are in line with those that state lawmakers used as the basis for tax increases and recommended cuts in future spending they enacted during last month's special session, meaning that barring an economic slowdown or huge new spending programs, the state will not likely return to the days of projected deficits anytime soon.
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NEWS
By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,Evening Sun Staff | January 16, 1991
Amid a recession and with the threat of war looming, key lawmakers in Annapolis fear that the Schaefer administration's revenue projections may be too optimistic and could create another budget shortfall next year.The spending plan that Gov. William Donald Schaefer will submit to the General Assembly in a few weeks is based on revenue projections that assume the recession will end in Maryland sometime this year.Although Maryland's economy took a turn for the worse last summer, causing tax collections to plummet and requiring budget cuts, Schaefer's projections still call for the Maryland economy to rebound strongly in July.
NEWS
March 11, 2006
Impeachment measure rejected The House Judiciary Committee has rejected a proposal to impeach a Baltimore judge who sided with 19 gays and lesbians and ruled that Maryland's marriage law discriminates against same-sex couples. The committee voted 20-3 late Thursday night that a proposal from Del. Donald H. Dwyer, an Anne Arundel County Republican, had no merit. Voting with Dwyer were Del. Tanya Thornton Shewell, who represents Baltimore and Carroll counties, and Del. Christopher B. Shank of Washington County.
NEWS
By John W. Frece and John W. Frece,Annapolis Bureau | March 12, 1992
ANNAPOLIS -- Something happened in the State House yesterday that hasn't happened for a long time: The governor got some good economic news.For the first time since December 1989, Gov. William Donald Schaefer was told that state revenues might actually go up next year.The state's Board of Revenue Estimates said a new agreement with the federal government will bring in enough federal Medicaid funds to offset most of a continuing decline in sales tax and lottery revenues.The Medicaid money, the board said, will not be enough to prevent another $7 million drop in revenue estimates for this fiscal year, but it is expected to produce a net $13 million revenue increase for fiscal 1993, which begins July 1.Legislative leaders, who have been laboring for months to get both this year's and next year's budgets in balance, had feared much worse news.
NEWS
By Tim Craig and Tim Craig,SUN STAFF | December 17, 2002
Gov.-elect Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. reaffirmed yesterday his pledge not to raise sales or income taxes, even as state analysts forecast another year of grim fiscal conditions for Maryland. In his most extensive comments on the state budget since the election, Ehrlich said: "Please trust us, income taxes and sales taxes are off the board. Period. End of discussion." The Republican also all but ruled out a proposal by Gov. Parris N. Glendening to give a 2 percent salary increase to state employees.
NEWS
By John W. Frece and John W. Frece,Annapolis Bureau of The Sun | January 24, 1991
ANNAPOLIS -- The General Assembly's chief budget adviser warned yesterday that the revenue estimates on which Gov. William Donald Schaefer is basing next year's state budget may now be too high by $75 million to $100 million or more.William S. Ratchford II, director of the Department of Fiscal Services, said the economic effect of war abroad combined with a deepeningrecession at home were not anticipated when the state's Board of Revenue Estimates delivered its official revenue projections in December.
NEWS
By C. Fraser Smith and C. Fraser Smith,SUN STAFF | May 7, 1997
Eighty-four-year-old Louis L. Goldstein, the Methuselah of Maryland politics, entertained 650 of his closest friends last night at a Woodlawn fund-raiser inaugurating his effort to win an 11th term as the state's comptroller and chief financial officer.The public career of the Calvert County native -- whose salutation, "God bless you all real good," seems at least as much a part of Maryland politics as the state motto -- now covers more than a half-century.Though he seemed on the verge of retirement a few years ago, this man who reports for work every day at a building named for him seems determined to run for comptroller in any year the office is theoretically open.
NEWS
March 11, 2006
Impeachment measure rejected The House Judiciary Committee has rejected a proposal to impeach a Baltimore judge who sided with 19 gays and lesbians and ruled that Maryland's marriage law discriminates against same-sex couples. The committee voted 20-3 late Thursday night that a proposal from Del. Donald H. Dwyer, an Anne Arundel County Republican, had no merit. Voting with Dwyer were Del. Tanya Thornton Shewell, who represents Baltimore and Carroll counties, and Del. Christopher B. Shank of Washington County.
NEWS
By Andrew A. Green and Andrew A. Green,SUN REPORTER | December 14, 2007
Maryland's tax collections are coming in on target this year, according to newly released state figures, but Board of Revenue Estimates members cautioned that the economic picture remains uncertain. The latest estimates are in line with those that state lawmakers used as the basis for tax increases and recommended cuts in future spending they enacted during last month's special session, meaning that barring an economic slowdown or huge new spending programs, the state will not likely return to the days of projected deficits anytime soon.
NEWS
By Tim Craig and Tim Craig,SUN STAFF | December 17, 2002
Gov.-elect Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. reaffirmed yesterday his pledge not to raise sales or income taxes, even as state analysts forecast another year of grim fiscal conditions for Maryland. In his most extensive comments on the state budget since the election, Ehrlich said: "Please trust us, income taxes and sales taxes are off the board. Period. End of discussion." The Republican also all but ruled out a proposal by Gov. Parris N. Glendening to give a 2 percent salary increase to state employees.
NEWS
By C. Fraser Smith and C. Fraser Smith,SUN STAFF | May 7, 1997
Eighty-four-year-old Louis L. Goldstein, the Methuselah of Maryland politics, entertained 650 of his closest friends last night at a Woodlawn fund-raiser inaugurating his effort to win an 11th term as the state's comptroller and chief financial officer.The public career of the Calvert County native -- whose salutation, "God bless you all real good," seems at least as much a part of Maryland politics as the state motto -- now covers more than a half-century.Though he seemed on the verge of retirement a few years ago, this man who reports for work every day at a building named for him seems determined to run for comptroller in any year the office is theoretically open.
NEWS
By Thomas W. Waldron and Thomas W. Waldron,SUN STAFF | March 12, 1996
Key lawmakers yesterday ruled out a cut in state income taxes this legislative term after the release of gloomy revenue estimates that were dragged down by the federal budget stalemate and the region's harsh winter weather.The Board of Revenue Estimates yesterday dropped its projection of state revenue by $55 million for the current fiscal year and $77 million for the budget year beginning in July -- reductions that make a tax cut impractical, legislators said."I think they [the projections]
NEWS
By LOUIS L. GOLDSTEIN | August 27, 1992
The Monday morning quarterback never throws too long, flubs a hand-off or gets sacked behind the lines. Of course, he never has the ultimate responsibility for the team's success or failure, either.The same is true for the armchair revenue estimators, who can predict revenue growth perfectly -- after the revenues have been collected.As chairman of the Board of Revenue Estimates, I'm one of three Sunday afternoon quarterbacks -- along with State Treasurer Lucille Maurer and Budget Secretary Charles Benton -- who have had the real responsibility of estimating revenues during an extremely unusual recession and major shifts in our nation's economy.
NEWS
By Marina Sarris and Marina Sarris,Annapolis Bureau | August 26, 1992
ANNAPOLIS -- Gov. William Donald Schaefer did not care much for Mahlon R. Straszheim in 1990, when he was one of the first economists to forecast the end of Maryland's economic growth. The governor thought Dr. Straszheim was pessimistic and his report "stupid."What a difference a recession and seven rounds of state budget cuts can make. Dr. Straszheim is now advising the governor on the state economy.Mr. Schaefer announced last weekend that he will be consulting with Dr. Straszheim, who chairs the economics department at the University of Maryland in College Park.
NEWS
By BARRY RASCOVAR | July 26, 1992
Will the defendants please enter the courtroom. . .The five of you -- William D. Schaefer, Louis L. Goldstein, Lucille D. Maurer, Roy C. Mitchell Jr. and Thomas V. Miller Jr. -- have been brought here today as alleged co-conspirators, charged with cooking the state's budget books. How do you plead?All answer in unison: Not guilty.Prosecutor: C'mon folks, fess up. All of you had a hand in pumping up the state's revenue estimates so badly we're $200 million in debt less than a month into the fiscal year.
NEWS
By BARRY RASCOVAR | July 26, 1992
Will the defendants please enter the courtroom. . .The five of you -- William D. Schaefer, Louis L. Goldstein, Lucille D. Maurer, Roy C. Mitchell Jr. and Thomas V. Miller Jr. -- have been brought here today as alleged co-conspirators, charged with cooking the state's budget books. How do you plead?All answer in unison: Not guilty.Prosecutor: C'mon folks, fess up. All of you had a hand in pumping up the state's revenue estimates so badly we're $200 million in debt less than a month into the fiscal year.
NEWS
By William Thompson and William Thompson,Evening Sun Staff Thomas W. Waldron and Melody Simmons contributed to this story | December 5, 1990
Maryland's financial troubles are more serious than anticipated and will cause an overall budget shortfall exceeding $400 million this year, top state officials are expected to announce tomorrow.Revenues collected from a spectrum of taxes and fees are now projected to fall about $368 million below estimates, the state Board of Revenue Estimates is to announce, sources said.The projected drop in tax receipts means that cuts in the $11.7 billion budget already under way by the Schaefer administration will have to be deeper and wider, say legislative sources.
NEWS
By John W. Frece and John W. Frece,Annapolis Bureau | March 12, 1992
ANNAPOLIS -- Something happened in the State House yesterday that hasn't happened for a long time: The governor got some good economic news.For the first time since December 1989, Gov. William Donald Schaefer was told that state revenues might actually go up next year.The state's Board of Revenue Estimates said a new agreement with the federal government will bring in enough federal Medicaid funds to offset most of a continuing decline in sales tax and lottery revenues.The Medicaid money, the board said, will not be enough to prevent another $7 million drop in revenue estimates for this fiscal year, but it is expected to produce a net $13 million revenue increase for fiscal 1993, which begins July 1.Legislative leaders, who have been laboring for months to get both this year's and next year's budgets in balance, had feared much worse news.
NEWS
By John W. Frece and John W. Frece,General Assembly's Department of Fiscal ServicesAnnapolis Bureau of The Sun James Bock of The Sun's metropolitan staff contributed to this article | October 30, 1991
ANNAPOLIS -- With the ink barely dry on a $446.5 million deficit-reduction plan put into effect just one week ago, state budget advisers delivered the grim but expected news yesterday that Maryland already faces a new deficit pegged at $149.5 million.The announcement means that Gov. William Donald Schaefer and the General Assembly will have to find a way to cut state spending for the sixth time in a little more than a year and for the second time since the current fiscal year's budget went into effect four months ago.Mr.
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