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NEWS
By Thomas W. Waldron and Melody Simmons and Thomas W. Waldron and Melody Simmons,SUN STAFF | February 24, 1999
Counties that lose state funding for local projects may seek support from Maryland's Board of Public Works, but the final decision remains with the governor and General Assembly, the state attorney general said yesterday.In an opinion requested by Carroll County legislators, Attorney General J. Joseph Curran Jr. said county officials can ask the Board of Public Works to endorse the need for long-planned bypasses for which Gov. Parris N. Glendening has canceled funding.But even if a majority of the three-member board endorsed the projects, the governor could withhold the money under the state constitution, Curran said.
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NEWS
By Doug Donovan, The Baltimore Sun | July 15, 2014
Maryland's Board of Public Works, a panel that includes the governor and other top state officials, did little to scrutinize millions in contracts it awarded in recent years to the financially strapped operator of a group home where a 10-year-old boy died this month, records show. And state agency officials who recommended LifeLine for various contracts from 2011 through September did not mention the company's fiscal and quality problems to the board - even as they touted a new process to reward only top-quality contractors.
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NEWS
By Laura Smitherman and Laura Smitherman,Sun reporter | July 17, 2008
The Board of Public Works delayed action yesterday on a contract with a bus company that failed to meet Maryland's minority business goals, though two of its three members said they believe the state has taken sufficient steps to ensure the company's future compliance. The contract with First Transit Inc. had raised the hackles of minority contractors because the company failed to meet the original goal that minority subcontractors perform 30 percent of the work. Last year, the company got a waiver from the Maryland Aviation Administration to reduce that goal to 13 percent on its contract to run shuttle buses that transport passengers to and from parking lots at the Baltimore-Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | February 9, 2014
County Executive Laura Neuman, House of Delegates Speaker Michael E. Busch, state Sen. Edward Reilly and other Anne Arundel County lawmakers joined school officials this week in petitioning the state Board of Public Works for more funding for school projects, namely $25 million to begin reconstruction for Severna Park High School. At the so-called beg-a-thon for statewide school money, state comptroller and Public Works board member Peter Franchot read from emails he'd received that depicted Severna Park High as "unsafe, unhealthy for children … and literally falling apart.
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,Sun Staff Writer Sun staff writer Marina Sarris contributed to this article | January 26, 1995
Like religious pilgrims, officials from most of the state's 23 counties and Baltimore descended upon Annapolis yesterday to pay homage to the guardians of school construction funding, the Maryland Board of Public Works.They came from as far away as Allegany County and the Lower Eastern Shore to flatter, persuade and cajole the board into funding renovations, roof repairs and new buildings dear to their constituents.During the seven-hour meeting, school superintendents, board of education members and legislators told of leaking roofs, ancient boilers, buckling floors and crowded classrooms.
NEWS
April 8, 2000
IT'S CALLED checks and balances. Gov. Parris N. Glendening -- any governor, for that matter -- shouldn't be able to hand out big pay raises to high-ranking members of his administration without approval from the Board of Public Works. The system "ain't broke, and don't need fixing," to re-state a commonly observed rule in Annapolis. So, a House of Delegates-passed bill that would remove that required approval makes no sense. The Board of Public Works' safeguard is so entirely in the public interest that one wonders why a governor so often called a man of policy would propose its eradication.
NEWS
By Childs Walker and Childs Walker,SUN STAFF | January 29, 2004
The Maryland Board of Public Works yesterday approved a $1.25 million grant to help Anne Arundel County preserve a 313-acre farm in the Jug Bay sanctuary along the Patuxent River in Lothian. The parcel, known as the Riggleman property, includes one mile of coastal frontage on Jug Bay, wetlands, woods, a vineyard and a historic house. Anne Arundel officials said they were thrilled with the Project Open Space grant, because the property is a key piece in their efforts to preserve a large swath of land along the Patuxent.
SPORTS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | September 21, 2000
The state Board of Public Works signed off on plans yesterday to erect a bronze statue of former Colts great Johnny Unitas near PSINet Stadium at Camden Yards. Lutherville sculptor Frederick Kail says he hopes to raise $250,000 through private donations for the project. With its base, the statue would stand 19 feet tall. It is expected to be ready for the 2002 football season. The Board of Public Works gave its approval for the Maryland Stadium Authority to accept the statue as a gift.
BUSINESS
By David Nitkin and David Nitkin,SUN STAFF | July 8, 2004
The Maryland Board of Public Works approved a $111 million airport cleaning contract with a Baltimore-based charity yesterday after giving the organization's chief executive a chance to defend his high salary and the company's business deals with board members. The state board, comprising Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr., Comptroller William Donald Schaefer and Treasurer Nancy K. Kopp, unanimously approved a multiyear deal with The Chimes Inc. of Baltimore for services at Baltimore-Washington International Airport.
NEWS
By ANDREW A. GREEN and ANDREW A. GREEN,SUN REPORTER | May 4, 2006
Comptroller William Donald Schaefer said yesterday that he's definitely running for re-election -- and he's doing it his way. On a day when reports circulated that the former Baltimore mayor and Maryland governor might soon get a second challenger in the Democratic primary -- Anne Arundel County Executive Janet S. Owens -- Schaefer showed that he would not hold his tongue, no matter who might run against him or whom he might offend. "If you're running for office, and I am, the right thing is to keep quiet, to play patty-cake," Schaefer said during a tirade against illegal immigration, one of a half-dozen outbursts at the state Board of Public Works meeting.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | January 6, 2014
The Maryland Port Administration is urging state officials to approve its sale of a 346,0000-square-foot pier in the Canton Industrial Area. The Clinton Street Marine Terminal, which has seen little use for decades, sits across the Inner Harbor from Fort McHenry in the 1800 and 1900 blocks of S. Clinton Street, and has an appraised value between $2.5 million and $3.1 million, according to remarks on the intended sale before the Board of Public Works....
NEWS
Erica L. Green and Erica L. Green | October 16, 2013
The pact that will facilitate the $1 billion, decade-long effort to upgrade Baltimore city school facilities was finalized today, with a unanimous vote of the Maryland Board of Public Works to approve a Memorandum of Understanding that will serve as a blueprint for revitalizing the city's dilapidated school infrastructure. The memorandum, which outlines the roles and responsibilities of state and local agencies over the course of the system's 10-year facilities plan, was a condition of the law that allows the district to orchestrate and fund 30 to 35 renovations and new structures.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | August 22, 2013
NOTE: An earlier version of this article inaccurately described Franklin Law Group's ranking in the bidding. The article below notes that the group was ranked first overall and fourth in technical merit. Gov. Martin O'Malley absorbed a rare drubbing in his personal political playground Wednesday as he found himself on the losing end of a 2-1 vote by the Board of Public Works. The defeat on the proposed award of a contract for children's legal services came as Treasurer Nancy K. Kopp, who normally votes with the governor on contested items, joined Comptroller Peter Franchot in voting to send the matter back to the Department of Human Resources with a suggestion that it re-examine how it chooses providers of such services.
NEWS
July 22, 2013
The Four Seasons at Kent Island may be viewed as many things, but surely one of them is a reality check for all the complaints of state government usurping control over land use decisions from local government (not mention all the harping on Maryland as an anti-growth state or a developer's worst nightmare). On Wednesday, the state Board of Public Works will once again take up the topic of the Four Seasons, a project that in 2007 came to symbolize the lack of teeth in Maryland's efforts to protect the Chesapeake Bay from excess development in the "critical" areas near the bay and its tidal tributaries.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | May 29, 2013
Maryland officials approved Wednesday a much-debated plan to move the headquarters of the state's housing agency — along with 380 jobs — from Anne Arundel County to Prince George's County. The three-member Board of Public Works voted unanimously to vacate the Department of Housing and Community Development's state-owned building in Crownsville. The department will move to leased space in a new, transit-oriented development at New Carrollton, a hub for MARC and Amtrak as well as the Washington Metro.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | March 21, 2013
The state Board of Public Works publicly scolded the Towson University president Wednesday for her handling of a decision to cut the college's baseball and men's soccer teams and delayed approval of a contract the university requested to build a campus in Harford County. Two members of the board - Gov. Martin O'Malley and Comptroller Peter Franchot - voted to postpone action on a small contract for pre-construction services related to the $25 million satellite campus until Towson's president, Maravene Loeschke, appears at their next meeting in two weeks.
NEWS
By Sarah Koenig and Sarah Koenig,SUN STAFF | January 23, 2003
Forget "beg-a-thon." The catchphrase of the day was far more akin to "love-in." Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr.'s wife, Kendel, brought brownies to Comptroller William Donald Schaefer at the Board of Public Works meeting yesterday. The brownies were wrapped up in a box. "You may recognize this wrapping paper," the governor said to Schaefer. "It's the transcript of your speech during the inauguration where you promised to behave yourself" at board meetings. "I'm a born liar," Schaefer replied.
NEWS
By Tom Horton and Tom Horton,SUN STAFF | December 20, 2002
MARYLAND'S BOARD of Public Works did the state proud this week, summoning courage amid bleak economic times to protect 25,000 acres of forestland. Few thought the second-largest land deal in modern history would get a majority - let alone unanimous approval from the state's governor, comptroller and treasurer at the board's biweekly meeting Wednesday. The vote was a boon for both economics and environment: preserving jobs and revenue from the timber industry along with 4,000 acres of wetlands, 31 miles of forested Chesapeake Bay tributaries and five square miles of wildlife habitat - most of it of the highest ecological value in the state.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | September 21, 2012
The O'Malley administration has chosen a Canadian company to operate two MARC commuter train lines, passing over a competitor whose critics have tied it to Nazi Germany and avoiding a potential fight with Holocaust survivors. The Maryland Department of Transportation is expected to seek Board of Public Works approval Oct. 3 for a nearly six-year, $204 million contract with Bombardier Transportation Services to run the Camden and Brunswick lines. The lines are now owned and operated by CSX Transportation, which has long wanted to get out of the business of running a commuter railroad.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | July 9, 2012
When a state agency tried to hire a new contractor to run a call center that fields inquiries about child support payments, an appeals panel intervened and called the process "deeply flawed" and "unreasonable, illogical and improper. " The move would have replaced the current company with a less-experienced firm that proposed running the center with about half as many live operators despite a projected increase in call volume. But in a rare move, the panel overturned the decision to award the new contract.
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