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By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,Sun Staff Writer | August 25, 1994
A state disciplinary board has charged an emergency room physician at Carroll County General Hospital with illegally prescribing a painkiller to the relative of a nurse.The Maryland Board of Physician Quality Assurance alleges that the doctor prescribed the painkiller Dilaudid at the request of the nurse, who was addicted to the drug.The board filed charges Tuesday against Dr. Robert L. Gossweiler, 61, an attending physician in Carroll County General's emergency room.According to the charging papers, in December 1993 a nurse in the hospital's emergency department asked Dr. Gossweiler to prescribe a painkiller for a relative who had been diagnosed with inoperable cancer.
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HEALTH
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | November 5, 2012
During a public hearing Monday about preventing concussions in student-athletes, the state Board of Physicians questioned why the issue has not been included in a task force's work and offered its assistance. The Maryland State Department of Education task force was created to gather research and public comment as the state considers new regulations to prevent concussions. The state school board passed emergency regulations in July requiring that coaches be trained to identify head injuries and that students be pulled from games after they suffer suspected concussions.
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NEWS
By Mike Farabaugh and Mike Farabaugh,Staff Writer | October 29, 1993
A 77-year-old doctor who practiced family medicine for more than 50 years in Havre de Grace has voluntarily surrendered his medical license in the wake of allegations that he illegally dispensed tranquilizing and painkilling prescription drugs, state medical authorities said yesterday.Edward J. Simon of the 3800 block of Somerset Court told the Maryland Board of Physician Quality Assurance in a letter submitted Wednesday that he understood surrendering his license meant he could no longer practice medicine.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | July 24, 2012
The Maryland Board of Physicians is expected to get some advice Wednesday on how to reform itself, eight months after a legislative review found the panel was not working fast or efficiently enough to protect the public from bad doctors. Dr. Jay Perman, president of the University of Maryland, Baltimore, was expected to offer his recommendations for overhauling the system of reviewing complaints, which auditors said took far too long to be resolved. The board was also criticized for not having a uniform system of review and lacking transparency, sometimes in violation of open meetings laws.
NEWS
By Michael Ollove and Michael Ollove,Staff Writer | October 21, 1993
Maryland's performance in the discipline of bad doctors has improved in the last two years, according to a national health research organization.The Public Citizen Health Research Group says Maryland ranks 27th nationally in dealing with incompetent and negligent doctors. In previous ratings by the organization, Maryland always ranked among the bottom 15 states."It is a sign for optimism," said Dr. Sidney Wolfe, director of the research group, which was founded by consumer advocate Ralph Nader.
NEWS
By Marina Sarris and Marina Sarris,Evening Sun Staff | March 8, 1991
Betty McIver says she would have trouble walking without the nutritional treatment she receives for multiple sclerosis.Paula Durcan says she would not have been able to give birth to her two children had it not been for similar unconventional, or "holistic," medical treatment she underwent instead of the hysterectomy a doctor had recommended.They have joined more than 100 other Marylanders in lobbying the General Assembly for a bill that would prevent a medical board from disciplining physicians solely because they practice unconventional or experimental medicine.
NEWS
March 29, 1991
Not in the business of 'punishment'A March 1 article in The Evening Sun concerning the Board of Physician Quality Assurance contains some misleading statistics and reflects a serious misconception of the mandate of the board.In 1989, the board's first full year, 29 formal actions were taken. In 1990, actions increased 110 percent to 61. Eighteen months ago, we had 513 cases over one year old; today there are 191.We are not in the business of "punishing" doctors for making mistakes. If that is what society wants, then legislation should be enacted to make medical mistakes a crime, and courts could then effect punishment.
NEWS
By Thomas W. Waldron and Thomas W. Waldron,Evening Sun Staff | November 12, 1991
The state board that licenses and disciplines physicians should distance itself from the medical establishment and open its records to the public, legislative analysts say.The 15-member Board of Physician Quality Assurance, which by law has only three non-physicians, should also add two more consumer members, according to a review by the legislature's Department of Fiscal Services.The recently released audit concludes that while the board's performance has improved in its three years of work, several major changes are still needed to ensure the competency of Maryland's doctors.
NEWS
By Marcia Myers and Marcia Myers,SUN STAFF | December 19, 1996
Under pressure from physicians, a state regulatory board said yesterday it will reconsider plans for a computer bulletin board listing doctors' malpractice, disciplinary and other records for consumers to read.The backlash from doctors may lead to restrictions on paper records that the Board of Physician Quality Assurance has provided to the public for years, one board member said.The online service is scheduled to begin next spring. But the board yesterday agreed to create an advisory group of its members, doctors and consumers, before the service goes forward.
NEWS
March 24, 2003
State physicians should govern their profession The Sun has chosen once more to weigh in on medical discipline issues, on which it clearly lacks understanding, by endorsing the attempt to lower the required standard of evidence from the "clear and convincing" standard, applicable to a variety of professionals in this and other states, to the monetary damages standard of "preponderance of the evidence" ("Doctor discipline," editorial, March 18). The Sun is clearly uninformed in its understanding of the most basic elements of this issue.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | February 1, 2012
The Maryland Board of Physicians, which has faced scrutiny in recent months because of its backlog of cases and other problems, is getting a new leader, state health officials said Wednesday. Carole J. Catalfo will begin work as the executive director Feb. 21, according to Dr. Joshua M. Sharfstein, secretary of the Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene. "Carole Catalfo is the right person at the right time for the Board of Physicians," Sharfstein said. "She brings both deep experience in regulatory compliance and professional oversight and a fresh perspective on the challenges facing the board.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | December 14, 2011
The state Board of Physicians Tuesday suspended the license of a Salisbury pain doctor, who the board said had not been using proper safeguards in prescribing opiates. Separately, state health officials had suspended Dr. Brent R. Fox's authority to write prescriptions for opiates and other controlled dangerous substances last week after their own investigation showed he was prescribing drugs in amounts outside of standards and was not conducting thorough exams of patients. The new action means the doctor can't practice medicine in Maryland for now. The doctor had been referred to the state by a managed-care organization with which Fox was affiliated, and the state has become more aggressive in tackling abuse of highly addictive painkillers.
NEWS
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | November 30, 2011
The chairman of the state Board of Physicians, which was slammed in a recent legislative audit for its dysfunction, told a panel of lawmakers Wednesday that it could get on track in another year by hiring an outside consultant and instituting long-awaited fixes. Several lawmakers said they've waited years for the board charged with protecting the public from bad doctors to clear a backlog of cases, institute sanctioning guidelines for doctors and develop transparent and consistent practices.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | November 21, 2011
The state Board of Physicians has a serious backlog of complaints and a growing timeline for resolving it, according to a newly released legislative audit of the agency charged with protecting the public from bad doctors. It also isn't keeping complete records and its actions lack transparency, sometimes in violation of open meetings laws, the review says. The review comes ahead of the General Assembly session in January, when lawmakers are to consider reauthorizing the medical board, which expires under a "sunset" provision.
NEWS
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | May 19, 2011
The Maryland panel that oversees doctors in the state has charged a man with practicing medicine without a license just weeks after his father's license was suspended for putting autistic children at risk. The Maryland Board of Physicians says David Geier worked with his father, Dr. Mark Geier, at the Rockville and Owings Mills offices of Genetic Consultants of Maryland, where they used a drug therapy that autism experts say is based on junk science. The pair has built a national following among parents who believe autism is linked to the mercury in vaccines, a theory discredited by mainstream medicine.
HEALTH
By Steve Mills and Patricia Callahan, Tribune Newspapers | May 4, 2011
A doctor nationally known for treating autism with a drug sometimes used to chemically castrate sex offenders has been suspended from practicing medicine in his home state of Maryland after state officials determined that he is putting children at risk. Dr. Mark Geier allegedly misrepresented his credentials, misdiagnosed children and urged parents to approve risky treatments without fully informing them of the potential dangers, according to the Maryland Board of Physicians. The board's order states that Geier "endangers autistic children and exploits their parents by administering to the children a treatment protocol that has a known substantial risk of serious harm and which is neither consistent with evidence-based medicine nor generally accepted in the relevant scientific community.
NEWS
By Marcia Myers and Marcia Myers,SUN STAFF | December 15, 1996
Almost 900 Maryland doctors have been disciplined since 1990 for everything from fraud to assault to errors in prescribing drugs. But few patients may know this because they have not been able to get speedy access to this kind of information.That's about to change. Next spring Maryland expects to become the first state in the nation to make disciplinary and malpractice records of physicians instantly available to the public, to the chagrin of more than a few doctors.The records, compiled by the state Board of Physician Quality Assurance on every doctor in Maryland, will be available to anyone equipped with a personal computer and a modem.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Sue Miller and Frank D. Roylance and Sue Miller,Evening Sun Staff | October 31, 1991
The superintendent of the state's Spring Grove Hospital Center for the mentally ill has been placed on probation by the state Board of Physician Quality Assurance for writing improper prescriptions in his private psychiatric practice.Dr. Bruce L. Regan, of Catonsville, was placed on three years' probation last week for prescribing narcotics in a manner "clearly outside the accepted standard of care." He was also ordered to undergo psychiatric therapy and evaluation.J. Michael Compton, the board's acting executive director, said today that the action against Regan had nothing to do with the doctor's work at Spring Grove.
NEWS
By Baltimore Sun staff | October 19, 2010
The Maryland Board of Physicians has released the list of doctors and other medical professionals who were sanctioned in September. Here is a summary of the actions; for more information, see The Baltimore Sun's Consuming Interests blog . The list: Romeo A. Ferrer, M.D., OB/GYN, Severna Park. Summary suspension. Improperly administered anesthesia. Thomas L. Fieldson, M.D., General practice, Waldorf. Summary suspension of June 10, 2010, is vacated, probation for 5 years subject to terms and conditions; and restriction from practicing pain management medicine and dispensing any opiates or benzodiazepine medications for any longer than 3 days and only in an emergency situation.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | September 18, 2009
Israel H. "Sonny" Weiner, a retired Lutherville neurosurgeon who had been president of the Maryland Board of Physician Quality Assurance, died of cancer Sept. 11 at Seasons Hospice at Northwest Hospital Center. The longtime Stevenson resident was 82. Born in Baltimore, the son of a hardware store owner and a homemaker, Dr. Weiner was raised in the city's Park Circle neighborhood. He was a 1945 graduate of City College and served in the Navy from 1945 to 1946. He earned a bachelor's degree in 1949 from the Johns Hopkins University.
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