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NEWS
September 1, 1991
Washington County Circuit Judge John P. Corderman has been elected to the American Bar Association's board of governors.During his three-year term, Judge Corderman will represent the 3rd District, which includes Maryland. The 33-member board meets five times a year to oversee the administration of the ABA and its more than 360,000 members.Judge Corderman was elected to the board at the organization's annual meeting recently in Atlanta. He has been a member of the ABA's house of delegates.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | November 6, 2009
Alexander Gray "Sandy" Jones, a retired Somerset County lawyer who had been a civil rights activist, public school advocate and a longtime member of the board of visitors and governors at Washington College, died Saturday of multiple organ failure at his Chestertown home. He was 82. Mr. Jones, the son of a lawyer and homemaker, was born and raised in Princess Anne. After graduating from Princess Anne High School in 1945, he served in the Army during the waning days of World War II. After the war, he attended Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University and Salisbury State before transferring to Washington College, where he earned a bachelor's degree in 1951.
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NEWS
May 31, 1992
WASHINGTON -- President Bush has appointed Norman R. Augustine, chairman and chief executive officer of Martin Marietta Corp. and a trustee of the Johns Hopkins University, as chairman of the board of governors of the American National Red Cross on Friday.Mr. Augustine will serve a three-year term.Mr. Augustine takes the reins at a time when the Red Cross is undertaking significant new programs under the leadership of its president, Elizabeth H. Dole.The organization has identified as top priorities the revitalization of disaster services, the reorganization of blood services and the decentralization of its field service system.
NEWS
October 18, 2007
The Officers, Board of Governors and Members of Woodholme Country Club, regret the passing of our Member, BERNICE SCHAPIRO and extend our sincere sympathies to her family. Arthur H. Adler, President
NEWS
October 18, 2007
The Officers, Board of Governors and Members of Woodholme Country Club, regret the passing of our Member, BERNICE SCHAPIRO and extend our sincere sympathies to her family. Arthur H. Adler, President
NEWS
April 22, 1993
Church health ministry picks vice presidentCarol L. Kershner has been appointed vice president of Sykesville-based Episcopal Health Ministries. She will be responsible for the development of Copper Ridge.Nancy Galloway receives insurance designationNancy R. Galloway of Harleysville Mutual Insurance Co.'s Chesapeake branch in Columbia has earned her Associate in Management designation from the Insurance Institute of America.Ms. Galloway, who has worked in the Chesapeake office since 1984, lives in Ellicott City.
NEWS
April 15, 1991
Services for Robert I. Lansburgh, a Baltimore-born businessman in Texas and longtime member of the Dallas Trade Mart board of governors, will be at 10 a.m. today at Temple Emanu-El in Dallas.Mr. Lansburgh, who was 73, died Friday at Baylor University Medical Center in Dallas after a brief illness.A grandson of merchant-philanthropist Jacob Epstein and son of the late Sidney Lansburgh, Mr. Lansburgh grew up in Northwest Baltimore.He was a 1936 graduate of the Park School and received a bachelor's degree from the College of William and Mary in 1940.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | December 23, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Even as Americans jam post offices to finish their holiday mailing, the Postal Service is working on a rate proposal that could raise the cost of a first-class letter to as much as 33 cents in 1995.Postal Service officials said yesterday that they needed to raise rates in 1995 for the service to break even, as it is required to do over a period of years. And because of the cumbersome process any increase entails, the service must make its request early in 1994, officials said.
SPORTS
December 10, 1998
NBA games lost yesterday: 8.Total games missed: 258.Earliest estimated date season can start: Jan. 15.Projected player salary losses (through Jan. 15): $430 million.Negotiations: Nothing scheduled. Union director Billy Hunter told agents during a conference call that he expects some of the season will be salvaged. Commissioner David Stern has refused to set a date after which all games will be canceled. Asked Tuesday, whether the season could begin in mid-February, he said, "No, I don't think so, but I am going to leave that to the Board of Governors."
SPORTS
By Ken Murray and Ken Murray,Staff Writer | March 24, 1993
The general manager of the Cumberland County (Maine) Civic Center said that Baltimore Skipjacks owner Tom Ebright is expected to sign a lease on Friday to transfer his American Hockey League franchise to Portland."
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | October 7, 2005
WASHINGTON -- No matter whom President Bush picks as a successor to Alan Greenspan in the next few months, Donald Kohn is likely to wield large influence over the way the Federal Reserve thinks about interest rates and the U.S. economy. During his 30 years at the Board of Governors, Kohn, 62, has attended more policy meetings than any current Fed member. He served as Greenspan's top strategist for 15 years before Bush promoted him to governor in 2002. He embraces much of Greenspan's thinking on financial markets, risk and interest-rate policy.
FEATURES
By Robert W. Welkos and Robert W. Welkos,LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 24, 2005
The Academy Awards are tightening rules designed to clamp down on the number of Oscar statuettes given out to producers for best picture and also have turned down a request by Hollywood stuntmen to create an Oscar category for stunt coordinators. This week's producers decision was hailed by the 2,000-member Producers Guild of America, which has been lobbying for years to curb the number of undeserving "produced by" credits on films. But the decision by the board of governors of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences to reject a new stunts category came as a stinging blow to stunt coordinators, who stage those breathtaking action sequences seen in big Hollywood action movies.
BUSINESS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 19, 2005
WASHINGTON - Edward M. Gramlich, one of two Democrats on the Federal Reserve Board, said yesterday that he will resign at the end of August. Gramlich, 65, joined the Fed in 1997, appointed by President Clinton. He said he would become a professor at the University of Michigan, and he plans to write books on the economics of airlines and on low-income housing. Gramlich's resignation will leave two open positions on the seven-man Federal Reserve Board. The other vacancy will be created by the departure of Ben S. Bernanke, who has been nominated to be chairman of the Council of Economic Advisers.
BUSINESS
October 15, 2004
In The Region MaggieMoo's plans 7-store expansion in the area by Jan. 1 MaggieMoo's International LLC, which owns and franchises more than 138 small-batch ice cream shops in 30 states, is planning to expand throughout Maryland, Delaware, Virginia and Washington, with seven new locations scheduled to open by the end of the year and 40 new shops planned by 2009. Four new stores will open this year in Maryland - in Bel Air, at Baltimore-Washington International Airport, in Bowie and in Rockville.
NEWS
By Bill Atkinson and Bill Atkinson,SUN STAFF | May 19, 2004
Facing troubling economic issues ranging from higher interest rates to record oil prices and early signs of inflation, President Bush sought yesterday to reassure the nation by formally renominating Alan Greenspan as chairman of the Federal Reserve. The two met at the White House yesterday, and Bush, who promised a year ago that he would retain Greenspan, kept his word, renominating him to a four-year term. "Sound fiscal and monetary policies have helped unleash the potential of American workers and entrepreneurs, and America's economy is now growing at the fastest rate in two decades," Bush said in a statement.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 14, 2004
PARIS - Iran indefinitely suspended international inspections of its nuclear facilities yesterday in an angry response to a resolution by the U.N. atomic agency that criticized its activities. The suspension came after a week of tense negotiations at the Vienna headquarters of the International Atomic Energy Agency, where Iran sought to quash and then soften international censure of its failure to fully disclose its clandestine nuclear program to the world. "Today, IAEA inspectors were expected to arrive in Iran," Iran's top nuclear negotiator, Hassan Rowhani, said at a news conference in Iran's capital, Tehran.
NEWS
October 16, 1990
Charles S. Garland Jr., a managing director of Alex. Brown & Sons Inc., died Saturday of cancer at his home on Devon Hill Road. He was 63.Services for Mr. Garland were being held today at the Episcopal Church of the Redeemer, 5603 N. Charles St.A member of the board of directors and executive committee of the brokerage firm, he had headed the Fixed Income Division, which handles bonds, since 1972. He joined the firm in 1954 and became a general partner 10 years later.A member of the board of governors of the Securities Industry Association who chaired its mid-Atlantic group, he also served on the board of the Public Securities Association.
FEATURES
By Robert W. Welkos and Robert W. Welkos,LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 24, 2005
The Academy Awards are tightening rules designed to clamp down on the number of Oscar statuettes given out to producers for best picture and also have turned down a request by Hollywood stuntmen to create an Oscar category for stunt coordinators. This week's producers decision was hailed by the 2,000-member Producers Guild of America, which has been lobbying for years to curb the number of undeserving "produced by" credits on films. But the decision by the board of governors of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences to reject a new stunts category came as a stinging blow to stunt coordinators, who stage those breathtaking action sequences seen in big Hollywood action movies.
NEWS
By William Hyder and William Hyder,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 19, 2002
In 1886, Robert Louis Stevenson wrote a morality tale called The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde. Dr. Henry Jekyll, a respected physician and scientist, is fascinated by the duality of human nature - good and evil existing side by side. In his laboratory he creates a potion that can separate the two and experiments on himself with tragic results. His malignant impulses are isolated in a being called Edward Hyde, who roams about London committing evil acts. The desperate struggle between Jekyll and his own worst nature forms the climax of the story.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | September 28, 2001
WASHINGTON -- Civil liberties groups are concerned about the Justice Department's request to Congress for greatly expanded powers to fight terrorism. While they're at it, they would do well to consider as part of the same fight the State Department's recent attempted muzzling of the Voice of America. At issue was an exclusive VOA interview with Mullah Mohammad Omar, head of the Taliban regime in Afghanistan. In it, Omar repeated that the Taliban would not turn over suspected terrorist leader Osama bin Laden and asserted that "America has created the evil that is attacking it."
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