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NEWS
September 8, 1997
THE BOARD OF ELECTIONS Supervisors in Annapolis is in a no-win situation. Although the three-member body is perceived as a non-partisan group charged with protecting the integrity of the election process, almost every case it considers is laden with political implications.Unless the Annapolis City Council is prepared to broaden the board's authority and elevate its members to quasi-judicial status, the volunteer board's natural tendency in decision-making will be to err on the side of caution.
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NEWS
By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | July 10, 2014
Maryland election officials have determined Republican candidate for governor Larry Hogan broke no laws in converting his Change Maryland advocacy organization into a campaign operation. But in a memo released Thursday, officials pointed out that a loophole permits corporations such as Change Maryland to test the water on behalf of candidates without disclosing donors or spending, as the candidates themselves must do. The ruling came after two of Hogan's rivals in last month's Republican primary filed complaints with the State Board of Elections in May. Jared DeMarinis, director of candidacy and campaign finance for the board, wrote in the memo that he was dropping the complaints.
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NEWS
November 12, 1996
BOARD OF ELECTIONS officials in Howard County made a big mistake a week ago. They should consider themselves lucky that a potential disaster ended up being a virtually harmless embarrassment.For two days after the election, the board reported that three questions to change the county charter lost in a landslide. In fact, they had won big. The public learned three days after the election that voters actually agreed the county should change phrasing in the charter from "Appeals Board" to "Board of Appeals" -- not an issue likely to elicit hot debate.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | April 24, 2014
The future of a system that would let voters download absentee ballots before mailing them in was cast into doubt Thursday when the State Board of Elections refused to move forward with part of the plan amid fears it would open the door to widespread fraud. The five-member panel declined to certify a system for marking the ballots on a computer screen despite assurances from its staff that the system was secure and ready to be used in this year's June primary and November general elections.
NEWS
By Kerry O'Rourke and Kerry O'Rourke,Sun Staff Writer Sun staff writers Mary Gail Hare, Amy L. Miller and Jackie Powder contributed to this article | November 9, 1994
Carroll County voters elected an all-Republican commissioner board for the first time in 24 years yesterday, ousting a popular Democratic incumbent in the process.Republicans W. Benjamin Brown, Donald I. Dell and Richard T. Yates were elected to four-year terms, with Mr. Yates finishing as the top vote-getter, results from all 41 precincts show.Democratic incumbent Elmer C. Lippy, an almost tireless campaigner who touted his attendance record and fiscal conservatism while in office, lost his bid for a second term.
NEWS
By Lisa Breslin and Lisa Breslin,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | May 4, 1997
Carroll County's Board of Elections lost its "detail guru" last week when Rosemary McCloskey retired as director, after 25 years of staying on top of the technological and legal changes associated with the election process.Since 1972, McCloskey has kept up with all the important policies and laws, old and new. She has been a walking encyclopedia, say her colleagues, the person who always gets paged for a quick, correct answer."She has experienced so many changes that she can rely on her experience, and so can we," said Pat Matsko, who worked with McCloskey for almost 11 years and is currently the acting elections director.
NEWS
March 28, 2002
An article about the 2nd District race for Congress in yesterday's Maryland section did not mention a Democrat who has filed with the State Board of Elections. Oz Bengur, 53, an investment banker from Ruxton who has never held elective office, filed on March 19.
NEWS
September 17, 2006
Results from some of the more closely watched races on the Republican side of the ballot in Tuesday's primary election with 69 of 69 precincts reporting (provisional and overseas absentee ballots will be counted this week) [SOURCE: Harford County Board of Elections]
NEWS
February 8, 2000
Howard County residents must register by Friday to vote in the March 7 presidential primary. Feb. 29 is the last day to request an absentee ballot application for the primary. The Board of Elections is at 8659 Baltimore National Pike, Ellicott City. Hours are from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday. The board will remain open until 9 p.m. Friday. Residents registered to vote can apply to the Board of Elections to serve as election judges for the primary. Compensation is $150. Applicants must attend a training class and be prepared to work from 6 a.m. to 9 p.m. Information: 410-313-2727.
NEWS
October 27, 2004
Baltimore City Council members Agnes Welch and Paula Johnson Branch will stay on the Nov. 2 ballot despite missing campaign finance reports, some more than a decade overdue, the State Board of Elections decided yesterday. Pointing to legal opinions dating to the 1970s, state board staff said yesterday that a law prohibiting people responsible for overdue finance reports from filing for office doesn't apply. Election Board Chairman Gilles W. Burger said state legislators should consider changing the law. "The fix to this is with the General Assembly, not with the Board of Elections," he said, adding: "I would like to see some more clarity here, but the law is the law."
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | April 5, 2014
Though felons are prohibited from voting in Maryland, 15 of them cast ballots in the 2010 gubernatorial election, according to a recently released audit. The finding in an Office of Legislative Audits' report criticized the State Board of Elections, saying the agency "did not have an effective process to ensure that individuals serving a sentence for a felony conviction were removed from the voter registration database, as required by law. " Each month, the board receives a list from the judiciary of all convictions and must manually sort out misdemeanors, which don't exclude people from going to the polls.
NEWS
December 11, 2013
The referendum petition sponsored by Citizens Working to Fix Howard County [FIXHOCO] was reviewed by the Howard County Board of Elections [HCBE], which approved the format. The HCBE also required that a "fair and accurate" summary of the issues targeted by the petition needed to be printed on the back of each signature sheet. The HCBE stated that it was not their role to assess the fairness or accuracy of the summary, but that it was possible that it could be contested in court by other individuals and/or groups.
EXPLORE
January 19, 2012
At its December meeting, the Laurel Board of Trade directors elected the following members as officers and directors for 2012: The officers elected are chairman, Matthew Coates, Photography By Madison; president, Michelle Arsenault, Stitching Pretty; vice president, Bernie Robinson, PNC Bank; and treasurer, Jan Able, retired from PNC Bank. The following members were elected directors: Laurie Blitz, Laurie's Something Special Coffee; Lee Brangan, Patuxent Financial Group; Don Henyon, retired from Citizens National Bank and a life member; Marilyn Johnson, the Marilyn Johnson Sewing and Creative Fabric Studio; Sean LeVere, Latin Image Studio; Bob Mignon, Minuteman Press; Kriss Phipps, Reality Inc.; Deborah Randall, Venus Theatre; Marvin Rogers, Laurel Mill Playhouse; Joe Tredway, Tredway's/PG Office Supply; and Kelly White, Revere Bank.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz, The Baltimore Sun | July 22, 2011
The State Board of Elections notified petitioners Friday that they have succeeded in their effort to have Maryland voters weigh in on a new law enabling illegal immigrants to pay in-state tuition at public colleges and universities. But advocates of the tuition bill have until Aug. 1 to file a lawsuit challenging the referendum. Elections officials have been counting and validated signatures over the past few weeks. In all, the board accepted 108,923 signatures, nearly double the approximately 55,000 needed to secure the referendum a spot on the November 2012 ballot.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz, The Baltimore Sun | June 22, 2011
The petition drive to give voters a chance to reject in-state tuition breaks for illegal immigrants is fewer than 8,500 signatures shy of succeeding, the Maryland State Board of Elections reported Wednesday. Elections officials said they had certified 47,288 names from the first batch of signatures, which were submitted at the end of May. Petition organizers must reach 55,736 valid signatures — a number equal to 3 percent of the voters in last year's gubernatorial election — to get the controversial law onto the 2012 ballot.
NEWS
By Baltimore Sun staff | June 22, 2010
More than 30 percent of a small sample of felons remained on Maryland's voter registration rolls after they were convicted of their crimes and should have been removed, according to an audit released on Tuesday. The review by legislative auditors of the Maryland State Board of Elections found that the statewide voter registration database needs better oversight, and criticized the state board for what it said were insufficient checks of local elections operations. Many of the problems noted by auditors were raised in past years.
NEWS
July 5, 2006
THE ISSUE: Last week, the referendum issue on the "Comp Lite" omnibus zoning bill was likely knocked off November's election ballot by a court decision that county Board of Elections members declined to challenge. The state's second-highest court found that petitions signed by more than 7,000 people provided too little information about the zoning bill for people to be fully informed about what they were signing. What do you think about this ruling, the Board of Elections' decision not to challenge it, and what voters should do now?
NEWS
By Rona Marech | January 24, 2008
More than 11,000 17-year-olds have registered to vote in Maryland and are eligible to participate in the state's Feb. 12 presidential primary if they turn 18 before the general election, officials say. By noon yesterday, 11,252 17-year-old voters - including 6,009 Democrats and 3,162 Republicans - had registered, said Roger Stitt of the State Board of Elections. Because local boards are sifting through paperwork and mailed applications are still arriving, final figures won't be available for several days, Stitt said.
NEWS
December 7, 2008
Transit cuts also affect MARC train ridership I read the story in The Sun "Transit riders fight bus cut," and I want to say that this situation also affects the MARC train ridership. The MTA is also cutting service of MARC trains into Harford and Cecil counties because of budget cuts. Like the bus service cutbacks, there are trains being cut and there will be no service the day after Christmas this year, and who knows what other cuts there will be next year. I agree with the comments in the article about the bus line cuts because the MARC trains have seen a 30 to 45 percent increase in ridership since the beginning of 2008.
NEWS
By Joe Burris and Joe Burris,joseph.burris@baltsun.com | November 6, 2008
While millions of Americans sat before TV sets on Tuesday night watching presidential election results, Jennifer Seidel was in her kitchen with a laptop, fixated on the Carroll County Board of Elections Web site. The Mount Airy resident sought to know how she fared among three other candidates vying for two open spots on the county's school board, which meant she spent much of the evening repeatedly pressing the refresh button. Around midnight, Seidel got the news: She placed first in balloting with 37 percent of the vote.
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