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NEWS
January 6, 1991
The Carroll County Board of Education is accepting submissions of names for the new elementary school being built in the Taneytown/Uniontown area.Although suggestions have been received over the past several weeks, the board will continue to accept submissions to the superintendent until 4 p.m. Wednesday.Write: Carroll County Board of Education, 55 N. Court St., Westminster, Md. 21157, or call 848-8280, 876-2208 or 875-3383.
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NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | June 4, 2014
George Arlotto officially become Anne Arundel County's next superintendent Wednesday, signing a four-year contract with an annual salary of $245,000. Arlotto, a former principal in Montgomery County, follows Kevin Maxwell, who left the school system last year to take a similar position in Prince George's County. Maxwell had worked with Arlotto when they were both in Montgomery County, and Maxwell lured him to Anne Arundel in 2006. Maxwell's salary as superintendent had been $257,000.
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NEWS
By Mark Guidera | July 14, 1991
It does seem strange that a man who spent 17 years smoking three packs of cigarettes a day has taken up the gauntlet to have adult smoking in public schools banned.But since he quit smoking several years ago, Keith Williams has had a vendetta against the habit, or as I prefer to call it, the addiction.And I wish him Godspeed. For he is about to run up against one ofthe most rule-conscious bureaucracies in the state: the State Board of Education.But if Williams and his fellow Harford Board of Education members are successful, they could break new ground for schoolsstatewide.
NEWS
January 29, 2014
The State Board of Education took an important step toward improving educational opportunities for students throughout Maryland this week when it approved new regulations designed to reduce the number of young people suspended or expelled from school. Educators have long recognized that kicking kids out of classes for relatively minor, nonviolent offenses rarely leads to improvements in behavior and may even be counterproductive. The new policy aims to encourage teachers and principals to find alternative ways of disciplining students that allow them to remain in school whenever possible so they don't fall behind in their studies or develop even worse problems outside the classroom.
NEWS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | December 29, 1991
The Board of Education is studying whether to reappoint School Superintendent Ray R. Keech.Keech informed the board Dec. 20 that he wants to serve another four years after his current term expires July 1.The 55-year-old administrator is paid $92,794.Under the county charter, the board must complete a review of Keech's performance byFeb. 1."I see no reason why he wouldn't be reappointed," board president George Lisby said. "The things he's been doing are the things that we've asked him to do."
NEWS
By Carol L. Bowers and Carol L. Bowers,Staff writer | April 21, 1991
Harford school administrators are holding out for full financing of their original $151.8 million budget request, which called for $88.6 million in county money.Harford public school administrators madethat position known Tuesday while the County Council reviewed in a budget work session County Executive Eileen M. Rehrmann's proposed $72.6 million county allocation to education. That's considerably less than the school board's original request of $88.6 million.The rest of the school board's budget is made up of federal, state and county dollars.
NEWS
By Laura Loh and Laura Loh,SUN STAFF | October 24, 2002
In keeping with a promise to hold the school system accountable to the public, school Superintendent Eric J. Smith presented yesterday the first of what will be regular monthly financial reports to the Anne Arundel Board of Education. Previously, the information was only presented to the board once a year. "It is essential we have this level of accountability in our effort to achieve our goals," said Smith, who has vowed to increase academic achievement by 2007. "Without that kind of work being done as a routine, you open yourself up to huge errors and catastrophic financial problems."
NEWS
November 10, 1991
From: Jennifer PrughEllicott CityMany students are displeased with the new drug and alcohol policythe Howard County Board of Education has instituted this year. The new penalties are overly harsh and seem pointless to many students.Most of us subjected to the new policy find the consequences steeperthan they need to be. The policy states that students caught using or possessing drugs or alcohol on school grounds will be suspended, must attend mandatory counseling and need to schedule a conference uponreturning to school.
NEWS
December 11, 2002
EDUCATION'S VERSION of the limbo dance has begun, with the release of scores from Maryland's new high school exams. The Maryland State Board of Education must decide how low to place the passing bar, and how high to make the stakes - potentially as high as requiring the exams for high school graduation. Unlike the party dance, with standardized testing, the lower you go (with the bar and with the stakes), the less meaningful the test becomes. The state board knows it. District superintendents know it. The students and their parents know it, too. And yet, after more than five years of discussion and development, and now the tests' first round, the pressure is on to influence the state board to set the passing standard at a politically acceptable, mediocre level.
NEWS
June 6, 2004
Superintendent Joe A. Hairston, superintendent of Baltimore County Schools and secretary-treasurer of the Board of Education, will begin his second four-year term next month at the head of the nation's 23rd-largest public school system, with 108,000 students. Shortly after his appointment, Hairston established the Blueprint for Progress to chart the direction and progress of Baltimore County Public Schools. It continues to drive school and student performance. Most recently, the blueprint guided the design and development of the county's educational Master Plan, which will steer BCPS efforts through 2008.
NEWS
September 18, 2012
Tuesday's Baltimore County Board of Education meeting, along with all other afternoon and evening BCPS activities, has been postponed due to inclement weather. But when the board does meet on Wednesday, Sept. 19, their focus will be on keeping schools cool. On the board's agenda is a status report on the air conditioning in county public schools. The report, which is previewed on the school board's website - - looks at the county's plan for installing air conditioning in new and older schools, and includes information on budgets and scheduling.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | September 16, 2012
Leonard D. Wheeler, a retired Baltimore public school educator who since 2008 had been president of the Harford County Board of Education, died Tuesday of a heart attack at his Bel Air home. He was 73. Dr. Wheeler had presided over the board's Monday evening meeting. "I am deeply saddened by the news of the unfortunate passing of Dr. Leonard D. Wheeler," said Harford County Executive David R. Craig in a statement released Thursday. "Dr. Wheeler had a distinguished career as an educator and served with distinction and integrity as a member of the Board of Education," said Mr. Craig.
NEWS
April 26, 2012
Back in the 1990s, when I was still a high school teacher, our faculty spent a day at Shepherd Pratt - an appropriate venue as it turned out - listening to two educators from theWashington, D.C., public schools telling us how to teach black students. The irony of being lectured on how to educate black students by people from the nation's worst school system was not lost on most of us. Now it's 2012 and the circle is completed. The state of Maryland has a black state school superintendent, Lillian Lowery, and a 12-member state Department of Education that includes not a single white male.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | April 25, 2012
The Maryland State Board of Education said Wednesday that Anne Arundel County government underfunded schools by nearly $12 million for the current fiscal year, striking down the county's appeal of an earlier ruling that it failed to meet a state-mandated funding requirement. The requirement, referred to as maintenance of effort, says that counties must give school systems at least the same level of funding per pupil as in the previous year, adjusted for student growth. In November, Anne Arundel Superintendent Kevin Maxwell indicated to the state board that the county had appropriated $556.1 million for the schools, about $12 million short of the maintenance-of-effort target.
EXPLORE
Staff Reports | March 7, 2012
Residents from the Mays Chapel area are expected to attend the Tuesday evening meeting of the Baltimore County Board of Education to oppose the plan to build a new elementary school at Mays Chapel Park. The agenda for the March 6 meeting, set to begin at 7 p.m. at the board headquarters, 6901 Charles St., Towson, includes an item for the board to grant its blessing for the use of the Mays Chapel tract. Staff of the school is recommending that the site be accepted, saying in agenda documents that, "Based on a preliminary assessment and subject to Maryland State Department of Education approval, the site at Mays Chapel is the most viable in relieving the overcrowding in the Lutherville area.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | February 1, 2012
The state Board of Education is fielding public comment on its contention that the Anne Arundel County government did not meet a state-mandated education funding requirement, it announced Wednesday. The state board's move comes about two months after interim state schools Superintendent Bernard Sadusky sent a letter to Anne Arundel County Executive John Leopold stating that the county was not in compliance with its fiscal year 2012 funding requirement. State law requires that local governments maintain at a minimum the same per-pupil funding as the previous year.
NEWS
By BRIAN SULLAM | August 9, 1998
HOW WILL it end?Not the Bill Clinton-Monica Lewinsky-Kenneth Starr imbroglio, but the bare-knuckles fight between Anne Arundel County Executive John G. Gary and the Board of Education.We are more than five weeks into the 1999 fiscal year, and the county's education budget is still in flux.Sitting before the County Council is a request for a supplemental appropriation of nearly $6 million for the school system. It would be added to the $454 million already allocated.Mr. Gary made an unprecedented appearance before the council last month, partly to complain that the school board had not indicated to his satisfaction how this additional money would be spent.
NEWS
By Brian Sullam | July 26, 1998
THREE MONTHS ago, Anne Arundel County Executive John G. Gary insisted that the Board of Education's $454 million allocation was sufficient to operate the schools.Yet last Monday, he appeared before the County Council seeking an emergency supplemental budget request of nearly $6 million to ensure that students won't be hurt by cuts to the Board of Education's budget proposal.Is this the same John Gary who has championed fiscal frugality during his term as county executive? The same John Gary who accuses the board of misspending millions of tax dollars?
EXPLORE
November 29, 2011
The Prince George's County Board of Education will meet on Monday, Dec. 5, at 6 p.m., to elect the Board Chair and Vice Chair for the upcoming year. A swearing-in ceremony will be held immediately following the vote. The meeting is open to the public.
EXPLORE
November 3, 2011
The Prince George's County Board of Education will hold a board meeting Wednesday, Nov. 9, at 7:05 p.m., in the Board Room of the Sasscer Administration Building, located at 14201 School Lane, in Upper Marlboro. Interested persons can speak for three minutes by registering with the Board Office by 4:30 p.m. the day of the meeting. The System Oversight: Human Resources meeting on Nov. 10, will be rescheduled.
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