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NEWS
March 11, 2007
As reported in the March 12, 1964, edition of The Sun: A vow to rid Ellicott City of slum conditions within the next five years was made yesterday by Charles E. Miller, head of the Board of Commissioners. "What's more, we'll do it without a cent of federal aid," said the Republican chairman, "and do a better job, too." Should Mr. Miller accomplish such a feat - and there are those who would consider it a minor miracle - it will be in opposition to the plans suggested by other county officials.
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NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | August 5, 2013
The owners of the Fish Head Cantina in Arbutus, where a man was stabbed to death last month, were ordered to pay a $2,000 fine Monday by the Baltimore County Board of Liquor Commissioners. The board did not suspend or revoke the bar's liquor license. Thirty-six people, including employees and neighbors, showed up in support of the bar. An aunt of 22-year-old victim John Bowman spoke against the bar. An attorney for Fish Head Cantina said that the bar has improved security in recent years in response to request by the board and police, but violence can still occur.
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NEWS
November 27, 1994
The following editorial appeared in another zoned edition of the Baltimore Sun last week:* Carroll CountyJust because the current board of commissioners in Carroll County is considered "lame duck" doesn't mean its decisions should be "lame brained." Last week's decision to postpone the purchase of a 114 1/2 -acre parcel on Cranberry Road outside Westminster for a future high school was nonsensical, irresponsible and not in the public's greater interest.While the election may have changed the composition of the board, it did not mean that county government operations grind to a halt.
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller, The Baltimore Sun | May 8, 2012
Debate over the meaning of gold-colored sheets of paper passed among members of the Carroll County Board of Commissioners has pitted the elected officials against residents who allege they are thumbing their noses at state open meetings rules. Two residents complained to the commissioners and state officials Tuesday that the so-called "goldenrod" form — or as it's officially known, the "Board of County Commissioners Action Authorization Form" — violates the state's Open Meetings Act, which requires elected officials to meet publicly when conducting official government business.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | March 22, 1998
About 40 Carroll County residents have formed Citizens Against Big Charter Government to campaign against the proposed charter change in local government.Voters will decide May 2 if the three-commissioner form of government will remain in Carroll. Two initiatives on the ballot will ask voters whether to expand the commissioner board to five or change to an executive and county council.The anti-charter group has been meeting for about a month, said Carmen Amedori, who served nearly nine months as chairwoman of the charter-writing board.
NEWS
By Bruce Reid and Bruce Reid,Staff Writer | October 29, 1993
A father and son from Elkton were arrested yesterday and charged with attempting to bribe a Cecil County commissioner in a rezoning matter.Stephen Montanarelli, the state prosecutor, said the two men allegedly offered a "significant" amount of money to Commissioner W. Edwin Cole Jr. in July.At the time of the alleged bribe, the men were seeking to have their farmland on Old Elk Neck Road re-zoned so they could operate a tire-recycling business, Mr. Montanarelli said.John P. Martinuk, 71, and his son, Joseph P. Martinuk, 31, were arrested by State Police yesterday at George's Restaurant and Bar in Elkton.
NEWS
February 27, 1995
Limiting the number of lots a developer can record on land records is not an effective way to control growth. In fact, the decision last week by the Carroll County Planning and Zoning Commission to restrict developers to 75 recorded lots every two years in each subdivision may actually accelerate development and sprawl -- the very problems the policy is intended to curb.By reducing the number of lots that can be recorded from the current level of 25 each quarter -- equivalent to 200 every two years -- it is easy to be lulled into a false sense that this change will slow residential growth.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | December 22, 2002
Plans to build a water treatment plant at Piney Run Reservoir may have been scrapped by Carroll's new board of commissioners, but South Carroll residents who opposed the project are not done fighting. The residents are pressing on in their legal battle to stop county government from charging water customers fees that would be used to pay for future water projects. A lawyer for the county wondered aloud last week why those who successfully derailed the planned Piney Run plant would not "declare victory and go home."
NEWS
By James M. Coram and James M. Coram,SUN STAFF | May 5, 1998
Like their counterparts in Saturday's special election, absentee voters rejected a proposed change in the form of Carroll's government, but by a narrower margin.Absentees cast 576 votes against a charter government headed by a county executive and five-member county council, and 462 votes for it. They also voted nearly 2-to-1 against expanding the board of commissioners from three to five members. The tally was 325 votes for, and 636 votes against expansion.Fifty-one absentee ballots are outstanding.
NEWS
May 21, 2009
Somerset Democrats didn't slight minorities I live and work in Somerset County and I am a member of the Democratic Central Committee. I have read with great interest your article and editorial concerning racial disparities in Somerset County. While I agree with the gist of the article, I must take strong issue with using the recent appointment of James East to the Somerset County Board of Commissioners as an example implying that blacks and other minorities are specifically excluded from holding high office in our county.
NEWS
May 21, 2009
Somerset Democrats didn't slight minorities I live and work in Somerset County and I am a member of the Democratic Central Committee. I have read with great interest your article and editorial concerning racial disparities in Somerset County. While I agree with the gist of the article, I must take strong issue with using the recent appointment of James East to the Somerset County Board of Commissioners as an example implying that blacks and other minorities are specifically excluded from holding high office in our county.
NEWS
By Laura McCandlish and Laura McCandlish,Sun reporter | June 23, 2007
Maryland's highest court has released a nearly 40-page opinion explaining a ruling it made a year ago to keep Carroll County's government structure intact, saying that only the General Assembly could implement a redistricting map from which to elect five county commissioners. The Court of Appeals' decision voided a 2004 referendum in which Carroll voters overwhelmingly approved increasing the Board of Commissioners from three to five members, to be elected by district. The June 2006 case involved a long-standing political feud over two district maps, one favored by Carroll County's all-Republican delegation; the other backed by the then-county commissioners, the mayors of Carroll's eight municipalities and many residents.
NEWS
By Nia-Malika Henderson and Nia-Malika Henderson,sun reporter | April 22, 2007
After months of public wrangling over crime with Annapolis Housing Authority officials, Mayor Ellen O. Moyer will get the chance this summer to remake the agency's board of commissioners. Trudy McFall, who has served as chairwoman of the seven-member board since 2002, announced last week that she would not seek reappointment, and the terms of two other commissioners expire in July. For Moyer, the vacancies create an opportunity to tamp down on what she described as its recent tactic of "divide-and-conquer politics."
NEWS
March 11, 2007
As reported in the March 12, 1964, edition of The Sun: A vow to rid Ellicott City of slum conditions within the next five years was made yesterday by Charles E. Miller, head of the Board of Commissioners. "What's more, we'll do it without a cent of federal aid," said the Republican chairman, "and do a better job, too." Should Mr. Miller accomplish such a feat - and there are those who would consider it a minor miracle - it will be in opposition to the plans suggested by other county officials.
NEWS
By Laura McCandlish and Laura McCandlish,Sun Reporter | September 14, 2006
With about 1,000 absentee and provisional ballots left to be counted in Carroll County, incumbent Commissioner Perry L. Jones Jr. isn't conceding defeat in his re-election bid. Newcomer Michael D. Zimmer, a Mount Airy attorney, edged out Jones by about 450 votes in Tuesday's GOP primary for a chance to win a seat on the three-member Board of Commissioners in November. "I'm not going to declare defeat until the last vote is counted," Jones said yesterday. "I still have some hope. Regardless of what happens, the new commissioners won't be sworn in until Dec. 4. Until that time, I'm still a commissioner in Carroll County and proud to be."
NEWS
By Laura McCandlish and Laura McCandlish,Sun Reporter | September 3, 2006
Carroll County Republicans will be voting for three of 10 candidates for Board of Commissioners in a contested primary election Sept. 12. The three GOP victors will run against three Democratic candidates in the general election. Although a 2004 voter referendum called for electing five commissioners by district, a decision by the state's highest court rendered that measure moot. Instead, commissioners will again be elected at-large in November. South Carroll residents were especially disappointed to not gain more representation in their district.
NEWS
February 19, 1999
THE CARROLL County Board of Education should be commended, not for its original vote this month to rescind Martin Luther King Jr. Day as a school holiday, but for acting quickly to reverse itself.The board could have dug in its heels, claiming that others "misinterpreted" the decision. Instead of calling an emergency session, it could have delayed corrective action for weeks, allowing bad feelings to fester.The board's quick reversal stands in refreshing contrast to recent mistakes made by other governing bodies.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | January 27, 2003
A bid to expand the county board of commissioners from three to five members appears to be gaining momentum, with a large community group from South Carroll throwing its support behind the idea and members of the county's General Assembly delegation predicting that the issue is likely headed for referendum. The county's delegation is to vote tomorrow on a bill, drafted by Del. Donald B. Elliott, that would allow voters to decide whether the board should be expanded. If the delegation approves the bill, as expected, the General Assembly likely will go along with the Carroll representatives' wishes and the matter could be placed before voters next year, lawmakers said this week.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Gina Davis and Mary Gail Hare and Gina Davis,SUN STAFF | November 2, 2004
The Carroll County Board of Elections has spent the last week fielding hundreds of questions by phone, many the typical "where do I vote," but more than a few callers are asking the staff how to vote on Carroll's only ballot question and who to put on the school board. Question A on expanding the Board of Commissioners from three to five members and the nonpartisan race for two seats on the school board are the only local issues on the Carroll ballot. Carroll's League of Women Voters, which traditionally published a voters' guide, dissolved last year and no organization has filled that void.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | January 27, 2003
A bid to expand the Carroll County board of commissioners from three to five members appears to be gaining momentum, with a large community group from South Carroll throwing its support behind the idea and members of the county's General Assembly delegation predicting that the issue is likely headed for a referendum. The county's delegation is to vote tomorrow on a bill, drafted by Del. Donald B. Elliott, that would allow voters to decide whether the board should be expanded. If the delegation approves the bill as expected, the General Assembly likely will go along with the Carroll representatives' wishes, and the matter could be placed before voters next year, lawmakers said.
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