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NEWS
January 11, 1995
EuphemismI wince when I hear the word "orphanage." The institution, which actually was a euphemism for poorhouse, was established as a haven for children deprived of support by parents who died.In providing shelter and sustenance these facilities undoubtedly fulfilled a need. But for the most part children led a regimented, sterile lifestyle, particularly in orphanages funded under public auspices.The vast majority of orphanages were founded in the 19th and early 20th centuries. Many came under religious auspices: Associated Catholic Charities, Methodist Board of Child Care, Baptist Home for Children in Bethesda, the Episcopal Home in Easton.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | January 5, 2011
F. Duncan Cornell, a retired lawyer who had served on the Board of Child Care of the United Methodist Church for nearly 50 years and was also a longtime Maryland General Hospital board member, died Friday of pneumonia at St. Joseph Medical Center. The Lutherville resident had celebrated his 94th birthday last month. Frank Duncan Cornell, the son of a psychiatrist and a homemaker, was born in New York City and raised in Menands, N.Y., a suburb of Albany. Mr. Cornell, who was known as Duncan, was a 1934 graduate of the Milne School in Albany.
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NEWS
By Phyllis Brill and Phyllis Brill,Staff Writer | December 16, 1992
Fallston residents failed yesterday in a legal challenge aimed at keeping a planned $6 million foster-care complex for 60 abused and neglected juveniles out of their rural neighborhood.After more than two hours of arguments before two dozen residents, retired Circuit Judge Broadnax Cameron Jr. ruled in favor of an agency of the United Methodist Church, the Board of Child Care.Judge Cameron, sitting in Harford Circuit Court as a visiting judge, upheld an April 1992 Harford County Board of Appeals ruling allowing the church agency a special exception to build the complex in an agriculturally zoned district.
NEWS
By By Mary Gail Hare | The Baltimore Sun | April 3, 2010
The scent of chocolate wafted through the welcome center at the Board of Child Care as volunteers opened large cartons of candy bars, foil-wrapped chocolate eggs and sugary sculptures. "Free samples," one announced , as more helpers filed into the building on the Randallstown campus. But at that hour of the morning, most preferred a steaming cup of coffee. With assembly-line precision, the seasoned workers arranged pink, green or yellow grass in quart-size white pails and added multicolored plastic eggs filled with jelly beans, marshmallow treats, a few healthful snacks and a box with a chocolate rabbit that says "Somebunny loves you."
NEWS
By Carol L. Bowers and Carol L. Bowers,Staff writer | November 3, 1991
A chief opponent of a church agency's proposal to build a foster care complex in Fallston for abused young children has testified that hefears visiting parents could become violent, posing a danger to arearesidents."
NEWS
By Carol L. Bowers and Carol L. Bowers,Staff writer | December 1, 1991
Residents who live near the proposed site for a foster care complex south of Fallston say controversy over whether the project should be built has divided their hearts, homes and community.Tomorrow night, a county zoning hearing examiner will conduct a sixth, and possibly final, public hearing on the United Methodist Board of Child Care'sproposal to build a $5 million foster home at Harford and Reckord roads."It's been a very delicate issue for us," said Joyce Glorioso, who has been a vocal opponent of the project, as has her husband, Salvatore.
NEWS
By Phyllis Brill and Phyllis Brill,Sun Staff Writer | June 19, 1994
An agency of the United Methodist Church and the Fallston Meadows Community Association were back in court last week, arguing over the proposed construction of a foster care complex at Harford and Reckord roads.Fallston residents, who took their initial battle to the state Court of Special Appeals in Annapolis and lost in October, have regrouped and filed an administrative appeal in Harford County.Led by resident Salvatore Glorioso, the community association is appealing a decision by Harford County Planning Director Bill Carroll.
NEWS
June 18, 2008
SADIE MADELEINE STORATH, age 96, of Davidsonville, MD, died on June 15, 2008 at Crofton Care and Rehabilitation Center in Crofton, MD. Born in Havre de Grace, MD, she was the daughter of the late Randolph Frederick and Lenora Mae Fadeley Laye and wife of the late Joseph L. Storath. A lifelong resident of Harford County, she was a member of the Harford County Farm Bureau, Mount Tabor United Methodist Church, and the Methodist Board of Child Care. Mrs. Storath is survived by a brother, Donald F. Laye of Havre de Grace, MD; a sister, Evelyn C. Rodia of Havre de Grace, MD; a grandchild, Connie M. Lamb of Davidsonville, MD; and three great-grandchildren, Courtney Bauer of White Marsh, MD, Jacob Bauer of Salisbury, MD, and Jared Lamb of Davidsonville, MD. In addition to her parents and husband, she was predeceased by a daughter, Retha Boswell; a granddaughter, Retha L. Bauer; six brothers; and two sisters.
NEWS
By Beth Reinhard and Beth Reinhard,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 15, 1996
A proposed home in Fallston for abused and neglected youths has ignited an intense local debate about the community's responsibility to provide a place within its borders for such children.The plan -- proposed nearly six years ago by the Board of Child Care, a nonprofit group backed by the United Methodist Church -- would include a residential campus for as many as 40 children, most of them 12 or younger.The proposal has spawned standing-room-only public hearings, petitions to public officials and picketing in front of government buildings by residents who fear the home would increase crime, reduce property values and strain the water supply.
NEWS
By Carol L. Bowers and Carol L. Bowers,Staff writer | November 10, 1991
Experts for opponents to a proposed $5 million foster care complex in Fallston testified that drawing water for the facility could cause water levels in nearby wells to drop significantly.Grant Andersonand Rob Schweinfurth, hydrogeology experts, testified at a zoning hearing Thursday that well water 200 feet from the proposed site of a main well for the complex could drop 8 feet.Wells 500 feet from the complex's main pumping well could see a water level drop of 4 to 5 feet, said the two men, who work for Engineering Technology Associates in Ellicott City.
NEWS
June 18, 2008
SADIE MADELEINE STORATH, age 96, of Davidsonville, MD, died on June 15, 2008 at Crofton Care and Rehabilitation Center in Crofton, MD. Born in Havre de Grace, MD, she was the daughter of the late Randolph Frederick and Lenora Mae Fadeley Laye and wife of the late Joseph L. Storath. A lifelong resident of Harford County, she was a member of the Harford County Farm Bureau, Mount Tabor United Methodist Church, and the Methodist Board of Child Care. Mrs. Storath is survived by a brother, Donald F. Laye of Havre de Grace, MD; a sister, Evelyn C. Rodia of Havre de Grace, MD; a grandchild, Connie M. Lamb of Davidsonville, MD; and three great-grandchildren, Courtney Bauer of White Marsh, MD, Jacob Bauer of Salisbury, MD, and Jared Lamb of Davidsonville, MD. In addition to her parents and husband, she was predeceased by a daughter, Retha Boswell; a granddaughter, Retha L. Bauer; six brothers; and two sisters.
NEWS
By JONATHAN D. ROCKOFF and JONATHAN D. ROCKOFF,SUN REPORTER | January 18, 2006
The Maryland Cabinet official in charge of child welfare established yesterday a separate office directly under his authority to license and monitor 200 privately run group homes for troubled youths. Department of Human Resources Secretary Christopher J. McCabe appointed Carmen Brown, an executive with one of the state's biggest and most respected group home companies, as the first director of the new Office of Group Home Licensing and Monitoring. "It's a significant step for the department," McCabe said.
NEWS
By Gerard Shields and Gerard Shields,SUN STAFF | May 15, 1999
Baltimore's mayoral race may have failed to get off to a fiery start, but at least one candidate is hurling accusations of "political plagiarism."Democrat A. Robert Kaufman of the City Wide Coalition is taking exception to opponent Carl Stokes' calling for a $1 tax on tickets to sporting events at Camden Yards. The money would be used to help pay for city recreation programs.Kaufman said the ticket-tax idea belongs to Southeast Baltimore City Councilman Nicholas C. D'Adamo, who introduced a bill calling for the same tax two years ago. That proposal has been languishing in a council committee.
NEWS
By Beth Reinhard and Beth Reinhard,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 15, 1996
A proposed home in Fallston for abused and neglected youths has ignited an intense local debate about the community's responsibility to provide a place within its borders for such children.The plan -- proposed nearly six years ago by the Board of Child Care, a nonprofit group backed by the United Methodist Church -- would include a residential campus for as many as 40 children, most of them 12 or younger.The proposal has spawned standing-room-only public hearings, petitions to public officials and picketing in front of government buildings by residents who fear the home would increase crime, reduce property values and strain the water supply.
NEWS
By Phyllis Brill and Phyllis Brill,Sun Staff Writer | January 15, 1995
The Harford County Council, acting as the Zoning Board of Appeals, has upheld a hearing examiner's decision to allow the United Methodist Board of Child Care to build a controversial $6 million foster-care facility at Harford and Reckord roads in Fallston.The council's vote was 6-0, with council President Joanne S. Parrott abstaining, to dismiss the case filed by the Fallston Meadows Community Association.Salvatore Glorioso, the community association president who argued the group's latest case before both Hearing Examiner William F. Casey last July and the Board of Appeals Jan. 3, sat in the front row Tuesday as the vote was cast.
NEWS
January 11, 1995
EuphemismI wince when I hear the word "orphanage." The institution, which actually was a euphemism for poorhouse, was established as a haven for children deprived of support by parents who died.In providing shelter and sustenance these facilities undoubtedly fulfilled a need. But for the most part children led a regimented, sterile lifestyle, particularly in orphanages funded under public auspices.The vast majority of orphanages were founded in the 19th and early 20th centuries. Many came under religious auspices: Associated Catholic Charities, Methodist Board of Child Care, Baptist Home for Children in Bethesda, the Episcopal Home in Easton.
NEWS
By Mark Guidera | April 12, 1992
You would think that with the Board of Zoning Appeals' approval lastweek of a proposal to build a temporary-care facility for abused kids near Fallston, the posturing of opponents would ebb.But no. Thepanic, unfortunately, continues. Some opponents now threaten to appeal the ruling in court, again stalling the project.The appeals board issued a fair and reasonable decision in the case, addressing legitimate concerns of the the community and needs of the project.The appeals board struck this compromise in its decision: It specified that no more than 30 children at the facility couldbe between ages 12 and 17, and all other children must be between 2 and 12.The county zoning hearing examiner had said in his decision that any child over 12 had to be related to a younger child at the facility.
NEWS
By Carol L. Bowers and Carol L. Bowers,Staff writer | September 1, 1991
A United Methodist church agency that wants to build a $5 million foster care complex near Fallston has stepped up efforts to win public support for the project prior to zoning hearings later this month.The agency, The Board of Child Care of the Baltimore Annual Conference of the United Methodist Church Inc., since Aug. 14 has mailed out letters to Fallston area residents asking for public support for the project at two upcoming zoning hearings. They've invited area residents to a community meeting that their board of child care will conductSept.
NEWS
By Phyllis Brill and Phyllis Brill,Sun Staff Writer | July 17, 1994
A group of Fallston residents has lost what its members had hoped would be a second chance to argue their case against a $6 million foster care complex that has been proposed for their neighborhood.County Zoning Hearing Examiner William F. Casey ruled Friday in favor of the dismissal sought by the attorney for the Board of Child Care, an agency of the Methodist Church that wants to build the 60-bed facility for abused and neglected youths at Harford and Reckord roads.Led by resident Salvatore J. Glorioso, the Fallston Meadows Community Association had appealed in February a decision by Harford County Planning Director William G. Carroll that reaffirmed his interpretation of the zoning law relating to group homes.
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