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BUSINESS
By Kim Clark and Kim Clark,Sun Staff Writer | February 17, 1995
Eric Dott will ride up to the Toy Fair in New York today, taking a few high-tech computer games, some low-humor cardboard flipping disks called "pogs," and hopes of cementing a turnaround for Baltimore-based Monarch Avalon Inc.Sales of its board strategy games, such as "Diplomacy" and military games such as "Panzerblitz," have been in decline, and Monarch has lost money on its games for the past three years.But company executives say this will be the year -- and this weekend's annual gathering of toy buyers will be key to the year -- that they finally move into new and growing markets.
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FEATURES
By Samantha Iacia, For The Baltimore Sun | June 3, 2014
Date: April 6 Her story: Chrissy Bielot, 35, grew up in Pikesville. She works as a payroll analyst for an information technology staffing firm in Hanover. His story: Jeff Marshall, 36, calls Blackfoot, Idaho, his hometown, but says his family moved frequently while he was growing up because his father was an aircraft mechanic. Jeff moved to Maryland in July 2005 for his job as a conductor for CSX and is now a train dispatcher for the company. His parents, Chuck and Connie Marshall, are retired and live in Arimo, Idaho.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By SAM SESSA | October 26, 2006
Nayo Carter wanted an alternative to another night of clubbing. She was tired of having to shout at her friends on the dance floor and needed a more relaxing way to spend a Wednesday night. So Carter dusted off her collection of about 20 board games and brought them to the New Haven Lounge one Wednesday earlier this month. The event, called Got Game? turned into a weekly gig. And the result is one of the best ways to spend a Wednesday, hands down. "It was something reminiscent of everybody's' childhood," Carter said.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | November 16, 2013
Ed Sloman spends a lot of time at work playing games. Sloman, the owner of Games and Stuff in Glen Burnie, says he's probably played thousands of the board, card and storytelling tabletop games he sells, but his all time favorite is Magic: The Gathering card game. That's because it has "a strong theme, elegant mechanics and high replay value," the three ingredients in all his favorites. The players are planeswalkers (ultra-powerful wizards) locked in a spell duel, he says. The goal is to reduce your opponent to zero life points.
FEATURES
By Craig Timberg | July 3, 1991
In 1975, about 1,200 board game enthusiasts gathered at Johns Hopkins University to hold the first Origins board game convention.After much traveling around the country, the 17th Origins convention will return to Baltimore tomorrow, but this time as a four-day game extravaganza sprawled over the Convention Center and the Hyatt and Sheraton hotels.Organizers expect 6,000 to 8,000 people to attend seminars, scope out new products, socialize, but above all to play games. Lots of them. Thousands of games over the long weekend.
BUSINESS
By Michelle Singletary and Michelle Singletary,Evening Sun Staff | March 20, 1991
The Monarch Avalon game company, which has been losing money for four years, may finally be winning its battle with red ink due partly to the public's renewed interest in war games.The company's sales have been boosted by the popularity of its specially developed board game, Desert Shield, which hit the market last October.Sales of its Middle East-situated battle strategy games such as "Gulf Strike," which was just updated because of the Persian Gulf war, are also going well, said president Jackson Dott.
FEATURES
By Kristin E. Holmes and Kristin E. Holmes,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | November 30, 2002
In playing Sect: The Religious Party Game, the first person to land on enlightenment wins. Players face a choice of 500 questions on the world's religions, and creator Rick Weber of Mount Laurel, N.J., says it's fun. Yes, really. The General Electric salesman contends that there is a good time in sitting around a table and pondering who helped Jesus carry the cross or the number of times Muslims must pray during the day or that "West Bank" refers to the direction from which body of water.
NEWS
August 12, 2001
Editor's Note: Jerdine Nolen shows how board games can also be good learning tools at home. Board games are a great way to combine family entertainment and learning. They often require critical thinking, strategy skills, prior knowledge and sometimes teamwork. They teach language, science, comprehension skills, answers to trivia questions, math facts and correct spelling. You don't have to shell out big bucks on fancy set-ups; all you need is a flat playing surface, a way to move game pieces and some imagination.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tamara Ikenberg and Tamara Ikenberg,Sun Staff | January 21, 1999
Adult board games can be ideal icebreakers or ways to further probe the psyches of those you already know and love. Granted, you may not love them so much after hearing them explain why they'd prefer to be caught picking their nose and eating it instead of wetting their pants in front of their co-workers, while playing Zobmondo!!Zobmondo!! -- in which contestants must choose one of two bizarre hypothetical situations and discuss why -- is one of the hot board games joining the ranks of such best-selling adult classics as Scattergories, Taboo and Pictionary, and old reliables like Monopoly and Scrabble.
BUSINESS
By Kim Clark | December 9, 1990
The toy and game industry isn't much fun this year.Local toy and game company executives say that although their companies have grown during past recessions, there is evidence that consumers' concerns about the sagging economy and the possibility of war in the Middle East is squeezing gift budgets this year.A few hits, such as Barbie dolls and Nintendo video games, are expected to sell well. But the Toy Manufacturers of America Inc., a trade association, said two-thirds of its members are likely to have lower sales and profits this year.
NEWS
November 4, 2013
Xpanding Universe opened in September but celebrated its grand opening on Saturday, Oct. 19. At the west end of the Aberdeen Marketplace, Xpanding Universe sells comic books, graphic novels, trade paperbacks, collectibles, role playing games, board games, dice and more. With materials of interest to all ages, Xpanding Universe is a family destination. Interested in promoting literacy, Xpanding Universe recently participated in the Comic-Con sponsored by the Harford County Public Library Aberdeen branch.
FEATURES
By Douglas Nivens II, For The Baltimore Sun | August 20, 2013
Last month, I attended my fiancé's mother's wedding. Both she and her new husband knew each other for decades, each the surviving spouse of a prior marriage. Their wedding had the full works for a formal church ceremony: unity candles, live vocalists, flower girls and an off-white traditional wedding gown. Her two sons escorted her down the aisle, making a grand entrance in the sanctuary. She beamed when she pronounced her I do's, and the guests applauded at the union. Regardless of time, the newlyweds found love again.
NEWS
Susan Reimer | September 17, 2012
Connie and Nancy and I have been best friends since the seventh grade, and when the three of us get together, it is middle school all over again. Card games and board games are part of our mix, and I am happy to report that while I am no better at these games than I was nearly 50 years ago, I am much more mature about losing. I think the wine helps. I have to say, nothing prepared me for life better than Park and Shop, a board game of competitive errand-running. Not even The Game of Life, with its kids and college funds and insurance policies, got me in shape for adulthood any better than Park and Shop.
NEWS
September 3, 2011
Nobody likes to be inconvenienced with power outages. Of course it is hard, but in a case like this you can't expect the power companies to fix everything immediately. It amazes me that they can clear up all those trees, debris and downed lines as quickly as they do. We should be glad if we only have the problem of no power and that our homes aren't completely destroyed. The Carr family ("Four days without juice, too much time spent in Panera," Sept. 1) should be glad they had a generator and not complain that it made it hard for their son to sleep.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 28, 2010
Charles Swann Roberts, an author and co-founder of publishing company Barnard, Roberts and Co. Inc. known for his extensive histories of the Pennsylvania Railroad, died Aug. 20 from complications of emphysema and pneumonia at St. Agnes Hospital. The Halethorpe resident was 80. Mr. Roberts was working in his Willow Avenue office in Halethorpe, which overlooks the former Pennsy mainline (now the Northeast Corridor) when he was stricken, said a daughter, Jean R. Schweitzer of Catonsville.
SPORTS
By Melinda Waldrop and Tribune Newspapers | March 7, 2010
Pat Kennedy knew what was coming. There was just nothing he or his Towson team could do about it. Old Dominion rolled to an 86-56 victory against the Tigers in Saturday's Colonial Athletic Association quarterfinal, out-rebounding Towson by a single-game tournament record 33 boards. The Monarchs (24-8), the top seed and regular-season champions, had 60 rebounds, also a single-game tournament record, to the Tigers' 27 and outscored them 44-20 in the paint. "I saw them rebound early in the season against Georgetown.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 28, 2010
Charles Swann Roberts, an author and co-founder of publishing company Barnard, Roberts and Co. Inc. known for his extensive histories of the Pennsylvania Railroad, died Aug. 20 from complications of emphysema and pneumonia at St. Agnes Hospital. The Halethorpe resident was 80. Mr. Roberts was working in his Willow Avenue office in Halethorpe, which overlooks the former Pennsy mainline (now the Northeast Corridor) when he was stricken, said a daughter, Jean R. Schweitzer of Catonsville.
FEATURES
By Deborah Bach and Deborah Bach,SUN STAFF | August 5, 2000
Debbie Otto and her husband, Greg Mayer, are spending their summer vacation in Maryland the same way they have for the past decade. For five days, they'll stay inside a hotel, barely seeing daylight. Sleep will be forsaken. Long hours will be spent hunched over tables in windowless rooms, strategizing. The Inner Harbor will be missed once again. This is a holiday? For Otto and Mayer, the annual getaway is something they look forward to all year. The Missouri couple is among an estimated 1,000 to 1,500 people converging on the Marriott Hunt Valley Inn this week for the annual World Boardgaming Championships, which continue through tomorrow.
NEWS
By Jill Rosen and Joe Burris | February 12, 2010
At first, the Feeley family turned to board games - such a cozy, Norman Rockwell portrait of a snowed-in family. Mom and Dad vs. the girls, moving the pieces of Life, Sorry and Connect Four as snowflakes whirled outside their Parkton home. Eventually gamed out, they beeped and buzzed their way through electronic toys, popped in one movie after another, and then fidgeted in front of regular TV. Lauren, 11, and Shannon, 8, even resorted to books before someone started touching someone's stuff and someone went into someone's room, and pretty soon Mom had to institute the dread "No Touch Rule."
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