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NEWS
April 19, 2000
Last week we asked you to name all the animals that helped build the winter house in "A House Is Not a Home." Samantha Colvin, David Alan Snyder and Henry William Glanding III (all from Villa Cresta Elementary School) identify those industrious wild things as: deer, hares, fox, (wild) boar, hedgehog and badger.
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NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun restaurant critic | December 9, 2007
Food **1/2 (2 1/2 stars) Service *** (3 stars) Atmosphere **** (4 stars) The best way to approach Cinghiale in Harbor East is as a wine bar. A very ritzy wine bar, to be sure. But wine is where its strengths lie; and while the food certainly isn't an afterthought, it almost feels as if it's there to support the wine, not the other way around. At best, they are equal partners. By now does anyone interested in restaurants in Baltimore not know that Tony Foreman and Cindy Wolf have opened what they call an enoteca (Italian wine bar)
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NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun restaurant critic | December 9, 2007
Food **1/2 (2 1/2 stars) Service *** (3 stars) Atmosphere **** (4 stars) The best way to approach Cinghiale in Harbor East is as a wine bar. A very ritzy wine bar, to be sure. But wine is where its strengths lie; and while the food certainly isn't an afterthought, it almost feels as if it's there to support the wine, not the other way around. At best, they are equal partners. By now does anyone interested in restaurants in Baltimore not know that Tony Foreman and Cindy Wolf have opened what they call an enoteca (Italian wine bar)
NEWS
By LIZ ATWOOD | August 5, 2007
Tom Noonan grew up in the Midwest and calls Rochester, Minn., his hometown, but he fell in love with the Mid-Atlantic when a job opportunity took him to Washington, D.C., several years ago. After spending time in Texas, he moved to Baltimore at the end of December to become head of the city's main tourism organization. "This is like coming home," Noonan says. Noonan, 42, lives with his wife, Mindy, in Canton with their miniature dachshund, Macy. 1. New music for my iPod "I'm a fan of all kinds of music.
NEWS
By LIZ ATWOOD | August 5, 2007
Tom Noonan grew up in the Midwest and calls Rochester, Minn., his hometown, but he fell in love with the Mid-Atlantic when a job opportunity took him to Washington, D.C., several years ago. After spending time in Texas, he moved to Baltimore at the end of December to become head of the city's main tourism organization. "This is like coming home," Noonan says. Noonan, 42, lives with his wife, Mindy, in Canton with their miniature dachshund, Macy. 1. New music for my iPod "I'm a fan of all kinds of music.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 1, 2007
THEATER AUGUST WILSON'S 'GEM' Gem of the Ocean, the next to last play August Wilson wrote before his death in 2005, has its regional premiere at Washington's Arena Stage tonight. Set in 1904 Pittsburgh, the play is, chronologically, the first in Wilson's decade-by-decade chronicle of the 20th-century African-American experience. And, it plants the seeds for many of the events and characters that appear in plays set in subsequent decades. Among these characters is mystical, many-centuries-old Aunt Ester, who was portrayed in the 2004 Broadway production by Phylicia Rashad and is portrayed at Arena by Lynnie Godfrey.
NEWS
By Anne Liersch | April 12, 2000
* Editor's note: A bossy badger learns that compromise and cooperation are important tools when it comes to building lasting friendships. It was a beautiful autumn day. Fox warmed herself in the last rays of the sun. The hares scampered here and there. Wild Boar munched on acorns and chestnuts, and Deer nibbled on the last juicy grass in the glen. Only Hedgehog snuffled restlessly through the leaves. "It will be winter soon," she said. "How do you propose we keep ourselves warm when the snow flies?"
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie and Karol V. Menzie,SUN STAFF | August 10, 1997
If there's one place where bigger is better, it's the Baltimore Summer Antiques Fair, where an expanded contingent of dealers some 450 strong will offer visitors an enormous diversity of objects from itty-bitty enamel boxes to roomfuls of furniture in the Baltimore Convention Center this coming weekend. Dealers from around the country will be featuring, among other things, glass and crystal, jewelry, silver, china, ironware, stoneware and pottery, bronzes, clocks of all varieties, old and antique telephones, needlepoint and embroidery, rugs, furniture, prints, posters and paintings, and decorative objects of all kinds.
SPORTS
By Vito Stellino | October 21, 1990
Serving the sentenceThe Oilers, who felt that Cincinnati coach Sam Wyche ran up the score on them in a 61-7 rout last year, had trouble keeping from gloating when they beat the Bengals, 48-17, last week.Center Jay Pennison of the Oilers said: "We don't want to brag yet. We have one game left with them this year [Dec. 23]. We win that and Sam's sentence will be paid in full."Cowboys not cocky nowThe Cowboys, who are 3-20 in their past 23 games and 4-30 in their past 34, usually find all kinds of ways to lose.
FEATURES
By Peter Jensen and By Peter Jensen,SUN STAFF | August 29, 2001
At 9 in the morning, the smoke is already rising from the grill behind Carolyn's CafM-i in Ridgely's Delight. Chef Ras Doobie has arrived at the restaurant early to get his charcoal-and-wood fire just right. It's a daily, time-consuming ritual. But he wouldn't have it any other way. Doobie takes jerk chicken seriously. His leg-and-thigh quarters have marinated all night in his secret seasonings, a recipe handed down by his mother. Now, they must be cooked outdoors over a medium-hot, smoky fire - or else the result wouldn't be jerk chicken at all. "It's the traditional way," says the 43-year-old native Jamaican who has been cooking professionally for 25 years.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 1, 2007
THEATER AUGUST WILSON'S 'GEM' Gem of the Ocean, the next to last play August Wilson wrote before his death in 2005, has its regional premiere at Washington's Arena Stage tonight. Set in 1904 Pittsburgh, the play is, chronologically, the first in Wilson's decade-by-decade chronicle of the 20th-century African-American experience. And, it plants the seeds for many of the events and characters that appear in plays set in subsequent decades. Among these characters is mystical, many-centuries-old Aunt Ester, who was portrayed in the 2004 Broadway production by Phylicia Rashad and is portrayed at Arena by Lynnie Godfrey.
NEWS
By Arin Gencer and Arin Gencer,sun reporter | October 13, 2006
Seventeen free-ranging pigs, including a 500-pound boar, were discovered and shot on properties next to a Carroll County farm that has been under state quarantine for about six months, according to county animal control officers. Seven of those euthanized might have been the offspring of a sow trapped Tuesday morning outside the quarantined farm, said Nicky Ratliff, executive director of the Humane Society of Carroll County. The properties where the swine appeared neighbor the 112-acre Marston farm belonging to Carroll L. Schisler Sr. More than 100 pigs were reported missing from the farm last month.
BUSINESS
By Louis Sahagun and Louis Sahagun,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 13, 2002
SANTA CATALINA, Calif. - Botanist Denise Knapp was overjoyed when she discovered a patch of a rare rock cress growing in Santa Catalina Island's remote and foggy Wild Boar Gully nature preserve. The tiny flowering plant had not been seen on the Southern California island in three decades. But it suddenly flourished behind a fence erected two years ago to protect the area from deer and feral goats that used to browse vegetation to oblivion. "Now, you can almost hear the plants sighing with happiness and relief," Knapp said on a recent weekday hike into the 112-acre preserve where she had found the so-called Santa Cruz Island rock cress plant in April.
FEATURES
By Peter Jensen and By Peter Jensen,SUN STAFF | August 29, 2001
At 9 in the morning, the smoke is already rising from the grill behind Carolyn's CafM-i in Ridgely's Delight. Chef Ras Doobie has arrived at the restaurant early to get his charcoal-and-wood fire just right. It's a daily, time-consuming ritual. But he wouldn't have it any other way. Doobie takes jerk chicken seriously. His leg-and-thigh quarters have marinated all night in his secret seasonings, a recipe handed down by his mother. Now, they must be cooked outdoors over a medium-hot, smoky fire - or else the result wouldn't be jerk chicken at all. "It's the traditional way," says the 43-year-old native Jamaican who has been cooking professionally for 25 years.
NEWS
April 19, 2000
Last week we asked you to name all the animals that helped build the winter house in "A House Is Not a Home." Samantha Colvin, David Alan Snyder and Henry William Glanding III (all from Villa Cresta Elementary School) identify those industrious wild things as: deer, hares, fox, (wild) boar, hedgehog and badger.
NEWS
By Anne Liersch | April 12, 2000
* Editor's note: A bossy badger learns that compromise and cooperation are important tools when it comes to building lasting friendships. It was a beautiful autumn day. Fox warmed herself in the last rays of the sun. The hares scampered here and there. Wild Boar munched on acorns and chestnuts, and Deer nibbled on the last juicy grass in the glen. Only Hedgehog snuffled restlessly through the leaves. "It will be winter soon," she said. "How do you propose we keep ourselves warm when the snow flies?"
BUSINESS
By Louis Sahagun and Louis Sahagun,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 13, 2002
SANTA CATALINA, Calif. - Botanist Denise Knapp was overjoyed when she discovered a patch of a rare rock cress growing in Santa Catalina Island's remote and foggy Wild Boar Gully nature preserve. The tiny flowering plant had not been seen on the Southern California island in three decades. But it suddenly flourished behind a fence erected two years ago to protect the area from deer and feral goats that used to browse vegetation to oblivion. "Now, you can almost hear the plants sighing with happiness and relief," Knapp said on a recent weekday hike into the 112-acre preserve where she had found the so-called Santa Cruz Island rock cress plant in April.
FEATURES
By SUSAN REIMER | January 17, 1994
The moment I walked into the house, I knew instinctively that I didn't belong -- that none of my kind had been there for more than a weekend. The other women at the party the bachelor held knew it, too. "My God," whispers one, as we tiptoe through the rooms of this bachelor's pad, "this belongs in a museum." Exactly.He is young, very successful and very handsome, and he had outfitted his house by the water with every toy known to men.It was a kind of compact Disneyland for guys. No sign of a woman's touch anywhere except in its immaculate cleanliness.
TRAVEL
By Stephanie Fletcher and Stephanie Fletcher,Special to the Sun | September 19, 1999
An imposing antique forms a backdrop behind the reception desk at the Boar's Head Inn in Charlottesville, Va. The bottom portion contains shallow drawers, while the top half displays several rows of cubbyholes that once functioned as hotel mailboxes. Thick brass discs, each bearing the carved likeness of a wild boar, dangle from cup hooks at the tops of the cubbyholes. The golden ornaments form long, neat lines that gleam in the overhead light. When I ask the receptionist if I can take a closer look, she hands me a hefty fob attached to a brass key, and the heavy, glittering disc covers my entire palm.
NEWS
By Toby Smith and Toby Smith,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 11, 1999
PIANU DE JOS, Romania -- Holding a 7-iron on a pretty hilltop in a remote part of Transylvania, Paul Tomita takes a couple of easy practice swings.Eighty yards away stands a rippling flag. Fifty yards away stand some grazing sheep. "They're here to cut the grass," explains Tomita. "And to provide the fertilizer."Golf in Romania may sound a bit like polo in Rwanda. Even Tomita, a stout 84-year-old Romanian, with a white mustache and a black pipe stuck in his mouth, acknowledges the incongruity.
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