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BUSINESS
By Hanah Cho, The Baltimore Sun | September 13, 2011
Bank of America is not releasing details on how many Maryland workers are to be laid off in its job-cutting plan. The financial institutution, the largest in Maryland by deposits, said Monday that it planned to cut 30,000 jobs nationwide over several years. Bank of America says the move, along with other cost-cutting measures, will save $5 billion a year. The bank employs about 4,000 people in Maryland. It has not detailed the locations of any of the job cuts. hanah.cho@baltsun.com
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BUSINESS
By Hanah Cho, The Baltimore Sun | September 13, 2011
Bank of America is not releasing details on how many Maryland workers are to be laid off in its job-cutting plan. The financial institutution, the largest in Maryland by deposits, said Monday that it planned to cut 30,000 jobs nationwide over several years. Bank of America says the move, along with other cost-cutting measures, will save $5 billion a year. The bank employs about 4,000 people in Maryland. It has not detailed the locations of any of the job cuts. hanah.cho@baltsun.com
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NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | October 25, 1993
So this convicted drug dealer, Tony Joshua, is wanted for violating his parole in Baltimore County and, when the fugitive-hunters go sniffing for him, they head for his last known address.The last-known landlord tells them Joshua has been evicted.Working this case are Sgt. Al Rehn of the state police, veteran FBI agent Sam Wichner and Baltimore County Detective Donald Diehl. They hear from the landlord that Joshua left a pet -- a 4-foot boa constrictor.The boa had been taken to the animal shelter in Baldwin.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Services | December 12, 2008
Bank of America said yesterday that it planned to cut 30,000 to 35,000 positions - among the largest layoffs ever - over the next three years as it digests its acquisition of Merrill Lynch. That could amount to more than 11 percent of the combined firms' global work force of 308,000. Combining two firms as large as Bank of America and Merrill often involves eliminating duplicate jobs. Both have significant overlap in areas like research and investment banking. But Bank of America, based in Charlotte, N.C., acknowledged that this round also reflects the dismal economy.
NEWS
By Paul Shread and Paul Shread,Staff writer | March 26, 1991
When Sgt. Robert E. Beans stepped down as head of the Annapolis Police Department's Black Officers Association last October, many assumedthe organization would be quieter under its new president, narcoticsDetective George Kelley.They were wrong. The association has been more active than ever during Kelley's six months on the job."The guy has exceeded my expectations," said Alderman Carl O. Snowden, D-Ward 5. "He took over the leadership of the BOA and hit the ground running. It has enhanced his position in the community tremendously."
FEATURES
June 14, 1998
" 'The Day Jimmy's Boa Ate the Wash' by Trinka H. Noble. Once upon a time, a slippery, slimy, scary, scaly boa constrictor was carried on a farm trip with Jimmy. Jimmy and his friends introduced the boa to the farm animals, but the chickens didn't like it. When the trip was over, everyone got back on the bus except the boa. Read this book to find out what the new pet was."- Justin Holland, Grade 3Leith Walk Elementary"My favorite book is 'Cam Jansen and the Mystery of the Television Dog' by David A. Adler.
NEWS
By Paul Shread and Paul Shread,Staff writer | February 19, 1991
The Annapolis Police Department's Black Officers Association has called on Mayor Alfred A. Hopkins to "do the right thing" and hire a black deputy police chief, a promise the mayor made a year ago at an event attended by 300 people."
BUSINESS
By JAY HANCOCK | May 28, 2003
JUST WHEN you thought it was safe to walk down Wall Street again without two Dobermans to repel the white-collar muggers, Allied Irish Banks brings new allegations of misdeeds against Bank of America and Citigroup. OK, the purported transgressions took place a few years ago, before the big New York financial houses were cleansed and absolved by St. Eliot. It's only the revelations of supposed wrongdoing that are new. But the claims made by Allied Irish last week in a lawsuit in U.S. District Court in Manhattan, if true, offer new evidence that Wall Street operatives always have and always will act in the interests of 1)
BUSINESS
By BILL HUSTED and BILL HUSTED,The Atlanta Journal-Constitution | June 5, 2008
B ecause I have a cell phone, I do not have a home phone. ... I don't have cable or dish service. Is there any company that offers Internet access only? I'm thinking I have the string, just no yo-yo. - Suzy Davis AT&T sells DSL access to those who don't have land-line phone service. My four-year-old Windows XP is getting sooo slow. I understand Windows XP is being phased out and my son is recommending I get a Mac. Please give me the plus and minus of the Mac over the Windows Vista. - C.C. Dickerson Both systems work well.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Staff Writer | June 22, 1993
Asked to name his favorite animal, 3-year-old Marc Horn immediately grabbed a "Curious George" book from his mother's lap and pointed to a monkey.Marc said he hoped a real monkey would be part of the "Baltimore Zoo Comes to You" exhibit at Eldersburg Library Monday."
NEWS
By John-John Williams IV and John-John Williams IV,Sun Reporter | June 15, 2008
Adorned in an Amy Winehouse-inspired black wig and dressed in a neon pink mermaid skirt, a matching feather boa, a pink-sequinedT-shirt and dusty pink house slippers, Robert Glick stood out yesterday among the thousands of people crowding The Avenue for the 15th annual Honfest in Hampden. Glick, a 43-year-old nurse from Pikesville, ditched his usual hospital garb for the over-the-top outfit in an attempt to be crowned Baltimore's Best Hon, a main staple of the festival where contestants dress in authentic "Hon" attire.
BUSINESS
By BILL HUSTED and BILL HUSTED,The Atlanta Journal-Constitution | June 5, 2008
B ecause I have a cell phone, I do not have a home phone. ... I don't have cable or dish service. Is there any company that offers Internet access only? I'm thinking I have the string, just no yo-yo. - Suzy Davis AT&T sells DSL access to those who don't have land-line phone service. My four-year-old Windows XP is getting sooo slow. I understand Windows XP is being phased out and my son is recommending I get a Mac. Please give me the plus and minus of the Mac over the Windows Vista. - C.C. Dickerson Both systems work well.
NEWS
By Stephen G. Henderson and By Stephen G. Henderson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 27, 2005
NEW YORK -- On a dank morning recently, employees of Conde Nast are straggling into this magazine conglomerate's corporate headquarters in Times Square. It's gloomy enough that Anna Wintour, Vogue's editor in chief, has doffed her famous 24-7 sunglasses as she trudges toward the elevator. And a sleepy Mayer Rus, Baltimore City College Class of '84, and now design editor for House & Garden magazine, groans aloud when an assistant summons him. He's urgently needed in a nearby conference room where a TV crew is speaking with designer Isaac Mizrahi about his new home collection for Target.
FEATURES
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,SUN STAFF | November 25, 2003
NEW YORK - A trail of fuchsia feathers tells the tale of Sunday's New Moon Goddess Express, from its dawn departure from Baltimore to an exultant conclusion in a Greenwich Village theater, where a shaman anointed the audience with fragrant oils. Wrapped in boas, the goddesses, 42 supporters of the American Visionary Art Museum who paid $300 each for the bus trip, shed their feathers and malingering inhibitions on an 18-hour odyssey of discovery and acquisition through Manhattan. In a fashion typical of AVAM's munificent founder, Rebecca Hoffberger, it was a day of disparate yet connected delights and revelations, of ancient myth and post-modern shopping, art appreciation and overeating, goddess oblige and goddess indulgences.
BUSINESS
By JAY HANCOCK | May 28, 2003
JUST WHEN you thought it was safe to walk down Wall Street again without two Dobermans to repel the white-collar muggers, Allied Irish Banks brings new allegations of misdeeds against Bank of America and Citigroup. OK, the purported transgressions took place a few years ago, before the big New York financial houses were cleansed and absolved by St. Eliot. It's only the revelations of supposed wrongdoing that are new. But the claims made by Allied Irish last week in a lawsuit in U.S. District Court in Manhattan, if true, offer new evidence that Wall Street operatives always have and always will act in the interests of 1)
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | November 15, 2002
Charles William Boas, a college geography professor, author and railroad historian who abandoned academia in midcareer for a clown's face of pancake makeup and the thrill and roar of the big top, died Tuesday of myelodysplastic syndrome, a blood disorder, at his home in Stewartstown, Pa. He was 76. Born and raised in Harrisburg, Pa., Dr. Boas served in the Navy in the Pacific theater during World War II after his high school graduation and later as...
NEWS
By Stephen G. Henderson and By Stephen G. Henderson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 27, 2005
NEW YORK -- On a dank morning recently, employees of Conde Nast are straggling into this magazine conglomerate's corporate headquarters in Times Square. It's gloomy enough that Anna Wintour, Vogue's editor in chief, has doffed her famous 24-7 sunglasses as she trudges toward the elevator. And a sleepy Mayer Rus, Baltimore City College Class of '84, and now design editor for House & Garden magazine, groans aloud when an assistant summons him. He's urgently needed in a nearby conference room where a TV crew is speaking with designer Isaac Mizrahi about his new home collection for Target.
NEWS
By Glenn Small and Glenn Small,Staff Writer | November 27, 1992
An uninvited guest showed up at the Fitzgerald home in South Baltimore looking for a free Thanksgiving meal, but it wasn't anyone the Fitzgeralds knew -- or wanted to know.It was a 6-foot boa constrictor. And he was hungry."I went to pick up the iron, and he [the snake] was eating out of the dog's bowl between the stove and the hot water heater," said Barbara Fitzgerald, 24, who had been preparing the family turkey dinner in the basement kitchen about noon when she discovered the snake. "I ran. I wasn't screaming -- I couldn't get anything out."
BUSINESS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SUN STAFF | February 15, 2001
A lawsuit filed yesterday against the Bank of America Corp. charges that the bank illegally obtained and distributed thousands of confidential consumer credit reports. The suit seeks $81 million in damages. Filed in U.S. District Court in Greenbelt, the suit claims that the bank used the confidential reports "without a permissible purpose" under the Fair Credit Reporting Act. It suggested that the credit reports were then sold for a variety of unscrupulous purposes. Rodney R. Sweetland III, a lawyer based in Arlington, Va., who filed the action, said the Bank of America illegally obtained credit reports on 27 of his clients - some of whom did not even bank with or have any relationship to the Bank of America.
FEATURES
June 14, 1998
" 'The Day Jimmy's Boa Ate the Wash' by Trinka H. Noble. Once upon a time, a slippery, slimy, scary, scaly boa constrictor was carried on a farm trip with Jimmy. Jimmy and his friends introduced the boa to the farm animals, but the chickens didn't like it. When the trip was over, everyone got back on the bus except the boa. Read this book to find out what the new pet was."- Justin Holland, Grade 3Leith Walk Elementary"My favorite book is 'Cam Jansen and the Mystery of the Television Dog' by David A. Adler.
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