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NEWS
April 19, 2007
MAURICE "Bo" KERBY, born October 15, 1919 in Baltimore, MD, passed away at his home in San Diego, CA, on April 9th, at the age of 87. Bo is survived by his wife of 60 years, Anne Kerby; his sister Theresa Kerby; his daughter Cathy Lapoint; his son-inlaw John Lapoint MD; and four grandchildren; Jeff and Eliko Lapoint; Jody and Kirk Hinkleman. Bo served his country in World War II as an Army Medic and worked for Baltimore Gas & Electric Co. directly after his service. Bo was a longtime, faithful member of the Shrine of the Little Flower Catholic Church in Baltimore.
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FEATURES
By Kim Fernandez, For The Baltimore Sun | September 22, 2014
Make plans to spend Sunday at the B&O Railroad Museum in downtown Baltimore for a great day of trains, history, and adoptable dogs. Bella's Bully Buddies dog rescue, which finds homes for pit bulls in need, will hold its Rails & Trails event from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., and all are invited for family fun and maybe the chance to add to that family. The rescue will host Choo Choo Blue, the museum's mascot, along with family and pet-friendly vendors, a dog-training demonstration, carnival games and prizes, a coloring and stamping station, live entertainment, a moon bounce, and a chalk and bubble fun station, too. Admission is just $1 and includes parking and museum admission.
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SPORTS
By Ken Rosenthal | March 10, 1992
ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. -- Even yesterday, there was the familiar electricity, the sheer thrill of seeing Vincent Edward Jackson perform. But he limped so slowly to home plate, hobbled so gingerly to first base, he would have been better off using his bat as a cane.Don't remember him that way. Remember him scaling the Memorial Stadium wall like he was riding a skateboard. Crushing a monstrous home run to lead off the 1989 All-Star Game. Starring in another hilarious Nike commercial. Flattening Brian Bosworth for the good of all mankind.
NEWS
By Sean Welsh, The Baltimore Sun | August 13, 2014
A light rail train briefly derailed near Oriole Park at Camden Yards Wednesday afternoon, temporarily limiting vehicle and foot traffic from Conway and Howard streets to the east side of the B&O Warehouse. A photo posted on Twitter showed the train jumped the track near the entrance to access road that leads to stadium parking lots at the intersection of Conway and Howard. Cars remained upright. A Maryland Transit Administration spokesperson said 10 people were aboard at the time of the derailment, but nobody was injured.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | December 12, 1998
As a small boy growing up in Waverly, Thomas H. Arnold watched and listened to the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad steam trains as they chugged through the neighborhood. He listened as their throaty whistles seemed to call to his soul and vowed to become a railroader one day.Mr. Arnold, who fulfilled his dream by spending almost 40 years ** in train service as a B&O Railroad freight conductor and later restored and operated historic locomotives at the B&O Railroad Museum, died Tuesday of a heart attack at the Charlestown Retirement Community.
SPORTS
By JOHN EISENBERG | March 19, 1991
Bo Jackson's unprecedented life as an athlete suddenly is as uncertain as a gray winter sky. The Kansas City Royals released him yesterday. Incredible. You can buy him for a buck. He is on the damaged table. His left hip is injured. There is a chance the injury is serious. Very serious.Tests have revealed early signs of a degenerative condition, common among the elderly, known as avascular necrosis. It means blood isn't circulating to his hip for some reason. The tissue there is dying. Avascular necrosis.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly | October 22, 1990
A most pleasant way to travel to New York from Baltimore was the Royal Blue, that beautiful train Baltimoreans believed was theirs.I will never forget the first time I saw a line of Baltimore and Ohio Railroad coaches at Camden Station. It was one sharp-looking train, awaiting passengers as the steam vapor rose out of hissing hoses. The engine and coaches were stunning, decorated in a deep, rich regal blue, perfectly offset by the warm gray, then highlighted with gold stripes and some black trim.
BUSINESS
By John H. Gormley Jr | April 4, 1991
Wearing white gloves, Shawn Cunningham gingerly removed a heavy canvas-bound book from its shelf in a vault at the B&O Railroad Museum.In the adjacent reading room of the museum's new research library, Mr. Cunningham placed the book on the polished antique boardroom table and opened the volume to its first entry -- the minutes of the April 24, 1827, meeting of the board of directors of the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad.Written in an ornate, almost artistic, 19th-century hand, this first record of America's first commercial railroad begins, "At a meeting of the directors Elect of the Baltimore & Ohio Rail Road Company the following certificates were produced and read to wit."
NEWS
By Patrick L. Hickerson and Patrick L. Hickerson,Staff writer | September 29, 1991
Women might not be prominently featured among the icons of the American railroad, but the Ellicott City B&O Museum is attempting to modify those images.Its current exhibit, "Women in Railroad," is the creation of museum director Jack Mitchell. After culling hundreds of issues of B&O Magazine, he is presenting "women working on the railroad through the eyes of people who made a few notes of it in the magazine."His labors chronicle the women who worked for the B&O from the days of the Civil War to the middle of the 20th century.
BUSINESS
By Jay Hancock | March 17, 2002
THEY DIDN'T have 28-year-old Wall Street analysts in 1827 to hype the initial public stock offering of the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, but they didn't need any. They had the media. "We have no doubt that the entire 15,000 shares will be subscribed on the first day," the American and Commercial Daily Advertiser reported of the B&O offering in March of that year. "Though it is far from being our wish to contribute in the least to any false excitement, we perceive the promptness with which the present plan has been adopted by all classes."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Lily Hua and The Baltimore Sun | July 10, 2014
As the head bartender and mixologist at B&O American Brasserie, Brendan Dorr, 34, has concocted drinks for every type of occasion for his restaurant's guests. But in September, Dorr will have the chance that only 14 mixologists from around the country have: showcasing a concoction at the Smithsonian's National Museum of American History. The National Museum of American History and Smithsonian Channel are toasting to the 200 th anniversary of the Star-Spangled Banner with an event called Raise a Glass to History.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | May 21, 2014
Charles N. "Norm" Murphy, a retired CSX executive and a collector of Baltimore & Ohio Railroad memorabilia, died Monday of lymphoma at Howard County General Hospital. He was 87. Charles Norman Murphy was born in Baltimore into a B&O family. His father, Norman Murphy, had been in the railroad's operating and labor relations departments. Two uncles each had 40 years' service in the purchasing and passenger traffic departments. His mother, Bertha Murphy, was a homemaker. He was raised on Augusta Avenue, and while a junior at City College, began his railroad career in 1943 as a part-time messenger in the "GO" central telegraph office in the B&O's headquarters building at North Charles and Baltimore streets.
NEWS
By Louise Vest | May 20, 2014
May 1965 Youth in the news  County notes in the Times:  "Guilford: Six youths and nine adults from Howard County were delegated to the twenty-fifth annual Maryland State Conference of the NAACP branches on Saturday May 1, at Rockville. At the banquet concluding the event, the Honorable George Weaver, Assistant Secretary of Labor, was guest speaker, Mrs. Juanita Jackson Mitchell is state president of the organization. "Holiday Hills: Donna Hill, daughter of Dr. and Mrs. James Hill of Vista road, is a Merit Scholarship winner.
NEWS
By Sean Welsh, The Baltimore Sun | May 6, 2014
A 65-year-old steam locomotive will be restored and transferred from the B&O Railroad Museum to the Western Maryland Scenic Railroad. The restoration will bring the locomotive back to full service. Built by the Baldwin Locomotive Works in September 1949 as the last commercially-built steam locomotive for use by a U.S. railway, the engine has been at the museum since 1972, according to a Western Maryland Scenic Railroad news release. "This historic agreement is a win-win for railroad preservation.
SPORTS
By Jeff Zrebiec, The Baltimore Sun and By Jeff Zrebiec, The Baltimore Sun | April 19, 2014
OXFORD, Ohio - With a blinding sun and a mostly empty Yager Stadium at his back, Ravens coach John Harbaugh peered into a crowd that contained so many people he wanted to thank. To his right were his parents, wife and daughter, along with other members of his extended family. To his left were about 30 of his former teammates at Miami University (Ohio). Straight ahead were a couple of rows of football fans, many either wearing Miami red or Ravens purple. It was exactly how Harbaugh wanted to commemorate a memorable and rewarding weekend.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | December 31, 2013
Harry M. Wilgar Jr., a retired Baltimore & Ohio Railroad foreman at the Riverside roundhouse, died of lung disease Dec. 24 at his Westview Park home. He was 85. Born in Baltimore and raised on Harlem Avenue, he attended the old St. Martin's School and was a 1947 graduate of Mount St. Joseph High School, where he rowed crew. His father, Harry M. Wilgar Sr., was also a B&O foreman. His mother, the former Marie Corron, was a homemaker. He joined the railroad and worked for its successors until he retired in 1988.
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY | December 21, 1992
The traffic gets hectic at the venerable B&O Railroad Museum in Southwest Baltimore.Visiting the rich collection of retired locomotives has become an entrenched Baltimore tradition once schools close for the holidays.Thousands of families converge on the 1883 brick roundhouse for a day's worth of viewing the mighty show at the birthplace of American railroading. It's the time of the year when baby strollers outnumber the steam locomotives by about 10 to 1.People who haven't been inside the museum (about five blocks due west of Oriole Park at Camden Yards)
FEATURES
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | March 19, 2005
William F. Howes Jr., a retired CSX executive and rail historian, stepped aboard a sleeping car late Wednesday at Amtrak's Jacksonville, Fla., station, en route to Baltimore aboard the Silver Star. The former Guilford resident was riding the northbound train to attend this weekend's symposium on the Garretts and the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad at the Garrett-Jacobs Mansion on Mount Vernon Place. He was the symposium's first speaker and after dinner last night presented a talk illuminated with slides on the history of B&O passenger service.
NEWS
By Louise Vest | October 8, 2013
50 Years Ago Homegrown talent "Local Talent Entertains at Harriet Tubman, PTA. "The Harriet Tubman High School PTA held its first activity for the year, an October Feast. "In reality, this was a 'kick off' dinner to start the PTA membership drive, as well as, to begin the 1963-64 activities. The program this year consisted of home talent rather than having a guest speaker from outside the county. "Morris L. Woodson, Principal of the Guildford Elementary School, acted as Toastmaster.
SPORTS
By Jeff Barker and The Baltimore Sun | October 2, 2013
COLLEGE PARK - As they prepare for No. 8 Florida State, Maryland's coaches have studied video of Jameis Winston completing 25 of his first 27 college passes and film of the Seminoles quarterback twice bolting away from pressure last week to complete a ridiculously athletic Hail Mary against Boston College. What the coaches may not have seen are the redshirt freshman's other exploits - such as his moonshot throw over a fraternity house roof on a dare, or his impressively varied baseball skills - that have fans already likening him to Bo Jackson.
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