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By Gus G. Sentementes and Gus G. Sentementes,SUN STAFF | July 17, 2003
Baltimore Marine Industries Inc., the Sparrows Point shipyard that filed for bankruptcy protection last month, received court permission yesterday to operate for another week, and is putting together a plan to stay open through Oct. 31 as it continues to seek a buyer or a refinancing deal. Judge James F. Schneider gave permission for BMI to use $166,961 of its cash next week to cover payroll for 12 employees, employee insurance, security guard services, maintenance, legal fees and other general expenses.
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FEATURES
October 30, 2013
Q: How do I know if I need to put my child on a weight-loss diet? What is appropriate for a 9-year-old? A: Interestingly, 20 years ago, there was little interest in weight loss in a 9-year-old child. It was assumed that this was the “husky” age and that he would slim down with the impending start of pubertal height gain. We have regrettably learned that is too often a false assumption. You begin with a visit to your health care provider to document the true weight, weight percentile, height percentile and the Basal Metabolic Index (BMI)
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BUSINESS
By Kristine Henry and Kristine Henry,SUN STAFF | September 30, 2000
A dry dock that needs millions of dollars in repairs arrived at Baltimore Marine Industries yesterday, but the huge award could slip away if a competing shipyard has its way. BMI won the $16.6 million Navy contract last month, but a Virginia shipyard that also bid for the project quickly filed a protest with the General Accounting Office alleging that it, not BMI, should have won the job. Norfolk Shipbuilding & Drydock Corp. (Norshipco) argued in its Aug. 25 protest that BMI underestimated the cost to transport and house those crew members of the Resolute dry dock who must stay with it in Baltimore.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn | August 28, 2012
Someone with a lot of belly fat has a higher risk of death than those who are obese, a new study suggests. "We knew from previous research that central obesity is bad, but what is new in this research is that the distribution of the fat is very important even in people with a normal weight," said Dr. Francisco Lopez-Jimenez, senior author on the study and a cardiologist at the Mayo Clinic , in a statement. "This group has the highest death rate, even higher than those who are considered obese based on BMI. From a public health perspective, this is a significant finding.
BUSINESS
By Kristine Henry and Kristine Henry,SUN STAFF | September 18, 1999
Baltimore Marine Industries Inc. said yesterday that it has won several contracts that will bring the shipyard more than $9 million in new work.The contracts are one more step in BMI's ascent since it was created out of the former BethShip. Bethlehem Steel sold the shipyard to a New York-based merchant banking fund in 1997.Since then, BMI has boosted employment from 25 to 750 -- about 50 more than BethShip had when it was put up for sale -- and 150 contract workers. The turnaround has come with help from workers, who agreed to a 75-cent hourly wage cut, to $12.75, in return for profit-sharing.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes and Gus G. Sentementes,SUN STAFF | December 8, 2000
As part of the Navy's effort to dismantle its outdated ships, Baltimore Marine Industries Inc. has won a $4.1 million deal to scrap seven ships, a Navy spokeswoman said yesterday. The ship-breaking job is BMI's second since it was chosen as one of four companies to dismantle U.S. ships under a federal pilot program that began last year. The Sparrows Point shipyard finished dismantling the USS Patterson this year for $4.2 million. "It's a welcomed piece of news at this time of the year," said David Cassidy, BMI's president.
BUSINESS
By New York Times | August 19, 1991
WASHINGTON -- In a court decision hailed by cable television officials, a federal judge here has ruled that one of the two principal music-licensing associations cannot demand separate royalties from both cable television networks and individual cable systems.The decision affects tens of millions of dollars in copyright payments for background music for everything from serial comedies to old movies.The decision, issued late last week by U.S. District Court Judge Joyce Hens Green, came after a long-running dispute between the cable industry and Broadcast Music Inc., one of the two main associations that negotiate royalty agreements for the music used on radio and television and in the movies.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes and Gus G. Sentementes,SUN STAFF | June 13, 2003
Baltimore Marine Industries, which has seen its ship repair business slump more than 30 percent this year, has filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection and laid off its 200 workers. BMI, which depends mainly on government contracts for Navy ship repairs and maintenance, has seen business dry up after many military ships were positioned overseas last fall and this year in the buildup to the Iraq war, company officials said yesterday. The company filed for bankruptcy late Wednesday in U.S. Bankruptcy Court in Baltimore and is exploring reorganization alternatives, include debt refinancing and even a possible sale, officials said.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes and Gus G. Sentementes,SUN STAFF | June 28, 2003
About 80 workers at Baltimore Marine Industries Inc.'s shipyard at Sparrows Point were laid off yesterday after finishing maintenance work on a U.S. Navy ship, leaving about 30 employees at the yard and casting further doubt on the future of the company. BMI, which filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection June 11, received court approval this month to meet payroll obligations so that workers could complete work on the USNS Dahl, a company official said. The company, which is owned by Veritas Capital, a New York private equity investment firm, filed for bankruptcy after seeing business decline more than 30 percent this year.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes and Gus G. Sentementes,SUN STAFF | July 11, 2003
With dwindling cash and no pending contracts, Baltimore Marine Industries Inc. appears to be running out of time in its effort to keep the historic 113-year-old shipyard at Sparrows Point from shutting down. BMI, which filed for bankruptcy protection last month and laid off more than 200 workers, received approval yesterday from a U.S. Bankruptcy Court judge in Baltimore to use its funds to maintain the shipyard with about 30 remaining workers until Wednesday. Another hearing on the shipyard owner's financial position will be held at that time.
NEWS
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | July 11, 2012
Often, those who are very overweight have tried dieting for years before giving up in frustration. But more obese people are turning to bariatric surgery to jump-start their weight-loss programs. The surgery is low-risk but isn't for everyone. It requires a commitment to other lifestyle changes. But it can have many health benefits, according to Dr. Cynthia Long, advanced laparoscopic and bariatric surgeon at Sinai Hospital. Can you describe the different types of bariatric surgery?
NEWS
By Chris Emery and David Kohn and Chris Emery and David Kohn,Sun reporters | December 5, 2007
For overweight baby boomers looking for ways to live longer and healthier lives, breaking a sweat might be more important than shedding pounds. A study in today's Journal of the American Medical Association found that regardless of their weight, people of middle age who remain fit are less likely to die for any reason than their sedentary counterparts. Even obese people benefited from regular, moderate exercise, seeing significant reductions in their risk of heart attack, stroke and other illnesses, the study found.
NEWS
By Thomas H. Maugh II and Thomas H. Maugh II,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 28, 2007
For the third year in a row, Mississippi is the fattest state in the country and Colorado the leanest, but the obesity rate is increasing in all states, according to a report released yesterday. This year, Mississippi became the first state to have more than 30 percent of its residents classified as obese, but 47 states are above 20 percent, including Maryland. Just 15 years ago, no state was above 15 percent, according to officials from the Trust for America's Health, which prepared the report using federal statistics obtained through telephone interviews.
NEWS
By MILTON KENT | January 30, 2007
Two stories that slipped under the radar recently, one hopeful, one not so much, provide yet another window into the soul of where high school athletics are and where they might be headed. A new Iowa State University study of 251 Iowa high school football teams found that 9 percent of the linemen on those squads in the 2005 season had body mass indexes (or BMI) that could qualify as adult-class obesity, which suggests that we're willing to put our kids' health at risk earlier and earlier in the name of supposedly making them better.
NEWS
By JUDY FOREMAN | May 26, 2006
Is pregnancy riskier for teenagers than for adults? Yes, according to Dr. Laura Riley, an obstetrician and director of labor and delivery at Massachusetts General Hospital. In general, the lowest-risk pregnancies are those in women between the ages of 25 and 35. At the extremes of age -- teenagers and women 40 and older, the rate of pregnancy complications increases. Among other things, Riley said, teenagers are at higher than normal risk for pre-eclampsia, high blood pressure in pregnancy that, if untreated, can lead to coma and death.
NEWS
By GAILOR LARGE and GAILOR LARGE,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 28, 2005
Conventional wisdom says you should stretch before and after exercise to prevent injury and soreness. But a recent report in the British Medical Journal showing that stretching does not prevent next-day muscle soreness or injuries seems to refute that notion. Is there literature that supports stretching? The problem is that there are no gold-standard studies on stretching. The studies that the British Medical Journal cites had a total of 77 participants, too few to be statistically significant.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | April 23, 2005
Greg Peyser and Benson Erwin never think of themselves as overweight. As members of Johns Hopkins' top-ranked lacrosse team, they lift weights two to three times a week, and five days a week they run, scrimmage and hustle through a series of agility, shooting, passing and defensive drills "I feel like I'm in the best shape of my life," said Erwin, 23, a senior majoring in international studies. But all is not as it seems. Because both athletes are 6 feet 1 inch tall and weigh about 200 pounds, they're both overweight - according to federal standards - and so are most of their teammates.
BUSINESS
By Kristine Henry and Kristine Henry,SUN STAFF | September 12, 1999
Baltimore Marine Industries Inc. executives are clear on one thing: The shipyard first and foremost is in the repair and conversion business. But it sure wouldn't hurt if the company could land a pending deal with the Navy worth about $500 million -- nearly 10 times the revenue it had last year.The shipyard had been on a fast track to permanent mothballing two years ago, and the fact that it's earning any money at all seems remarkable.In 1997, Bethlehem Steel unloaded its unprofitable BethShip shipyard onto a New York-based merchant banking fund for nearly half the asking price.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | April 23, 2005
Greg Peyser and Benson Erwin never think of themselves as overweight. As members of Johns Hopkins' top-ranked lacrosse team, they lift weights two to three times a week, and five days a week they run, scrimmage and hustle through a series of agility, shooting, passing and defensive drills "I feel like I'm in the best shape of my life," said Erwin, 23, a senior majoring in international studies. But all is not as it seems. Because both athletes are 6 feet 1 inch tall and weigh about 200 pounds, they're both overweight - according to federal standards - and so are most of their teammates.
SPORTS
By PETER SCHMUCK | March 13, 2005
MIAMI HEAT superstar Shaquille O'Neal has a legitimate gripe, and for once it's not about Kobe Bryant. Shaq is a big, big guy, but he was a little taken aback when he found out the other day that he was rated as "obese" in a weight analysis of NBA players that was based on a formula promoted by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The CDC uses something called the Body Mass Index (BMI) to assess the risk of weight-related diseases by placing individuals into one of four categories, which are determined by a calculation of height and weight.
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