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BUSINESS
By Andrew Ratner and Andrew Ratner,SUN STAFF | July 8, 2001
When Cingular Wireless Inc. jumped on the national stage with a major ad campaign last winter, its executives acknowledged three concerns: Virtually no one knew of their company; it wouldn't be easy setting themselves apart from competitors; and technology can be a hard sell. "We didn't want to just be about technology," said Vance Overby, executive director for advertising and sponsorships for Atlanta-based Cingular. "We wanted to differentiate ourselves from cold, hard technology." To that end, executives reviewed thousands of names before settling on the unusual, but distinctive Cingular with a "c," to describe their company.
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NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | November 23, 2013
When Democratic gubernatorial candidate Douglas F. Gansler's campaign sent out a notice of an event on Thursday, something looked wrong: The anti-bullying forum was scheduled at a Prince George's County public school during class hours — something that normally isn't allowed for a political function. But there it was in Wednesday's news release: "Democratic gubernatorial candidate Doug Gansler will lead an anti-bullying event at Walker Mill Middle School on Thursday November 21 to challenge the Middle School Students to join the 'I Choose' campaign.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By SUSAN CARPENTER and SUSAN CARPENTER,LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 20, 2006
Everyone knows how to wear clothes. To put on a shirt, you slip your arms through the holes. To slide on shoes, you insert your feet. But the shirts and accessories from Edoc Laundry are a little more complicated. They actually come with instructions -- not about wearing them, but how to interpret them -- because the new clothing line isn't just clothing. It's a game. To the casual eye, the clothes' graphics look like the latest in urban cool, but step a little closer and you'll see words embedded in the designs.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser | November 20, 2013
When Democratic gubernatorial candidate Douglas F. Gansler's campaign sent out a notice of an event on Thursday, something looked wrong: The anti-bullying forum was scheduled at a Prince George's County public school during class hours -- something that normally isn't allowed for a political function. But there it was in Wednesday's news release: "Democratic gubernatorial candidate Doug Gansler will lead an anti-bullying event at Walker Mill Middle School on Thursday November 21 to challenge the Middle School Students to join the 'I Choose' campaign.
FEATURES
By Tim Warren and Tim Warren,Sun Book Editor | July 1, 1994
A new book about the Clinton White House opens with an August 1991 scene between Bill and Hillary Clinton in bed, discussing whether he should run for president. The dialogue is written as though the author were there himself, transcribing the couple's pillow-talk conversation. Throughout, there are neither footnotes nor other sourcing -- much like the previous books he has written.In this way, Bob Woodward's latest best-seller, "The Agenda," illustrates what has become an increasingly serious problem for nonfiction readers over the past few decades.
NEWS
By Sumathi Reddy and Sumathi Reddy,Sun reporter | September 10, 2007
It's hard to get them to admit it, but there is a palpable sense of relief on their faces, a sense that the end is in sight. Almost. These are the last handshakes. The last urgent messages reminding people to vote. The last requisite conversations with everyone from engaged voters to homeless people to those who are just angry. Tomorrow Baltimore voters go to the polls to pick the city's new leaders in an off-year election in which many voters are still undecided or even unaware of their choices.
SPORTS
By Ken Murray and Ken Murray,Sun reporter | September 17, 2006
The lines of perception and reality blur today when the Oakland Raiders bring their bad-boy image and unsightly seven-game losing streak to M&T Bank Stadium to play the revitalized Ravens. Discerning fact from fiction will be the chore of the day. More inside Ravens-Raiders scouting report, matchup to watch, statistics and depth charts. PG 13E
NEWS
By Georgia Beyard | November 14, 1995
As ancient pilgrims sought to enter bydegrees to Paradise, we pull our chilledand chastened bodies through rectangled sky-reflecting, rope-divided water, calledfrom wall to wall by hope and counted lapsto thirty-six, a half a mile, or more,depending on the breath, how many strokesthe heart decided that day to beat beforethe final lap. For now, the white-walled poolthe blue-walled room suffice through goggled blurand hyperventilated high to stealaway what...
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | October 10, 1995
By far, the biggest story in the British music press has been the battle between Blur and Oasis. Although it has so far been mostly a war of words -- mostly a parade of band members making fun of the other guys -- the music weeklies have taken the struggle seriously indeed, acting as if its outcome would somehow determine the future of English rock.Here in America, of course, no one cares about such things, and that's just fine with Oasis' Noel Gallagher. Speaking over the phone from Britain, where the band is touring in support of its just-released album "(What's the Story)
ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | May 8, 1997
As far as Pavement frontman Stephen Malkmus is concerned, touring is part of his job. "It's sort of a responsibility," he says, over the phone from a tour stop in Cincinnati. "If you're going to have [the record company] spend a certain amount of money on your record, you kind of have to go on tour."Fortunately, Malkmus loves his work. "Some things gall us," he says of the promotion process. "But with touring, we get to do our own thing, and it's a specifically Pavement thing. It's not like opening up for another band.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | November 13, 2013
Wear eye makeup to bed or don't wash your face well and you may wind up with pimple-like styes on your eyelids. The bumps don't typically lead to vision loss, but can cause scarring if not treated. Dr. Karen Dunlap, assistant professor of ophthalmology at The Wilmer Eye Institute at Johns Hopkins, said that it is easy to prevent eye styes. What is a stye and what are the symptoms? A stye, also known as an external hordeolum, is a localized infection in one of the oil glands at the edge of the eyelid.
SPORTS
Peter Schmuck | November 5, 2013
There's no sugar-coating it. The Ravens have gone from a "state of emergency" to an exercise in futility over the past three weeks and find themselves flirting with the first non-playoff season of the John Harbaugh era. What a colossal disappointment that would be, coming right on the heels of the franchise's second Super Bowl championship, but it wouldn't be the end of the world and it certainly wouldn't be vindication for all the sports talk...
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jordan Bartel | July 24, 2013
It feels like this day is dragging, so we thought you might enjoy this as much as we do. P.S. Monica Lewinsky turns 40 this week. That is all.
HEALTH
By Karen Nitkin, Special to The Baltimore Sun | February 8, 2012
When people come to the Reisterstown office of Drs. Eickhoff & Rowe for eye exams, the optometrists do more than simply ask which line of letters they can read on the eye chart. Like other eye doctors, James Eickhoff starts with a "complete case history," he said, which includes a rundown of family illnesses. If there's cancer or heart disease in your family, he wants to know about it. Of course, he tests your vision, but the eye exam also includes eye dilation, which allows him to see the back of the retina, where signs of hypertension and diabetes can be detected.
NEWS
By Nick Madigan, The Baltimore Sun | June 30, 2011
The plebes looked stunned. Under a relentless barrage of commands, most of them bellowed, some 1,200 members of the U.S. Naval Academy's Class of 2015 ran the gantlet of induction Thursday, a process that by any definition appeared to be an ordeal. In true military manner, however, most of the freshmen mustered a measure of stoicism. "It's good for me," said Michael Gerritsen, 18, from Dallas, who was breathing heavily as he waited in one of the many lines he would endure during the course of the morning.
SPORTS
By Ken Murray, The Baltimore Sun | March 19, 2011
There are no lines of distinction on the Loyola women's basketball team — not between senior and freshman, nor between starter and substitute. On coach Joe Logan's sixth Loyola team, the lines of seniority and privilege blur in sweet harmony. That's a telling reason why the Greyhounds have won 21 games — matching the school record — and notched the first postseason victory in Loyola history. It's also the reason Loyola (21-12) gets a second-round game in the Women's National Invitation Tournament in Reitz Arena at 4 p.m. Sunday against Virginia (17-15)
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | July 8, 1994
SAME AS IT EVER WASHouse of Pain (Tommy Boy 1089)Considering that two full years have passed since House of Pain took the rap world by storm with the playfully pugnacious "Jump Around," it's easy to understand why some fans would believe the rumors that HoP front manEverlast had died. He didn't, though -- he just ran out of ideas. "Same As It Ever Was," the Celtic crew's sophomore release, is a numbingly monotonous effort, full of repetitious cadences, interchangeable beats and rhymes seemingly pilfered from the Beastie Boys' outtake bin. Limited to a single track, like the driving "On Point," the punchy phrasing, noisy loops and booming, string-bass thump HoP prefers certainly has its appeal.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kate Shatskin and Kate Shatskin,Sun Staff | January 17, 1999
"The Orchid Thief," by Susan Orlean. Random House. 282 pages. $25.The Orchid Thief," the first book-length narrative by New Yorker staff writer Susan Orlean, begins as the tale of John Laroche, an orchid collector arrested for poaching rare blooms from the Fakahatchee Strand State Preserve, a wild swamp near Naples, Fla. But it's really the story of a small world of people mad for otherworldly flowers, and about the quest for unattainable beauty, and about the close link between the hope of finding something you crave and the fear of not finding it, and about Florida, the untamed home of much of the above.
FEATURES
By Dennis Hockman, Chesapeake Home | November 19, 2010
Borrowing commercial innovations and materials for use in homes and vice versa is becoming de rigueur in interior design. Think restaurant-grade stainless-steel appliances in an otherwise traditional country kitchen or the hospital maternity rooms that try to simulate cozy home interiors. Internationally known interior designer Clodagh, a leader in mixing things up, visited Baltimore in October for NeoCon East, a design conference that has evolved over the years as the place to be for anyone interested in new technologies and advancements in the commercial interiors industry.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson, Special to The Baltimore Sun | September 5, 2010
In Neil Simon's 1992 semi-autobiographical, semi-serious comedy, "Jake's Women," the audience is invited into famous novelist Jake's New York apartment to watch him struggle with his relationships with seven women. Last weekend, director Charles Maloney and a top-notch cast opened 2nd Star's 2010-2011 season with the play. In his program notes, Maloney describes the story as being about "a playwright-observer who loses himself in his god-like manipulation of his script world, forgoing participation in his own life and beginning to live vicariously in his own wish-fulfilling fantasies.
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