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By Susan King and Susan King,LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 8, 2005
Every Tuesday heralds the arrival of special or collector's DVD editions of movies, and this week is no exception with four anniversary editions of vintage films. The Blues Brothers - 25th Anniversary Edition (Universal, $23) includes the original theatrical and extended versions of the musical comedy starring John Belushi and Dan Aykroyd as the "legendary" Chicago brothers Jake and Elwood Blues - characters they introduced on Saturday Night Live. The musical numbers, which feature singers such as Aretha Franklin, Ray Charles and James Brown, are spectacular, but the comedy is overblown.
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By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | April 4, 2013
One of Pikesville's most charming and well-loved buildings - a 1937 Art Deco structure fronted by a stately marquee - could soon open its doors to movie patrons for the first time in 30 years. The Baltimore County Council will be asked on April 15 to approve a zoning measure that would allow two 80-seat theaters to be added to what currently is the Pikes Diner on Reisterstown Road. "Even though the Pikes Diner operated as a movie theater for many, many years, for some reason that's not currently one of the permitted uses of that facility," said County Councilwoman Vicki Almond, who has drafted a change to the current zoning classification that would rectify the oversight.
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By Tamara Ikenberg and Tamara Ikenberg,SUN STAFF | October 5, 1998
Saturday Night Live" has a sketchy film legacy.The Coneheads, Pat and Stuart Smalley may have first appeared "live from New York," but they died at the box office. Only "The Blues Brothers" and "Wayne's World" made successful leaps from sketch to screen.Sustaining a one-note joke for two minutes is tough enough.But sustaining the same one-note joke for two hours is nearly impossible.That didn't stop the powers that be at the aged late-night institution from trying to score with "A Night at the Roxbury" on Friday.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Susan King and Susan King,LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 8, 2005
Every Tuesday heralds the arrival of special or collector's DVD editions of movies, and this week is no exception with four anniversary editions of vintage films. The Blues Brothers - 25th Anniversary Edition (Universal, $23) includes the original theatrical and extended versions of the musical comedy starring John Belushi and Dan Aykroyd as the "legendary" Chicago brothers Jake and Elwood Blues - characters they introduced on Saturday Night Live. The musical numbers, which feature singers such as Aretha Franklin, Ray Charles and James Brown, are spectacular, but the comedy is overblown.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | February 6, 1998
"Blues Brothers 2000" doesn't tell much of a story, but it makes for one smokin' concert.A sequel to the blues-soaked car-wreck that was the original "Blues Brothers," it brings back much of the surviving cast from that 1980 film, offers up a flimsy story line about how the surviving brother is dedicated to reviving the act, makes a half-hearted attempt to instill some family values, then sits back and lets the music take control.L Wise move -- one of many this surprisingly deft movie makes.
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By New York Daily News | April 28, 1992
"I hear you have to buy your way onto the radio," says Spike Lee. He flashes a smile."Well," says Lonette McKee. "How much do you have?"Mr. Lee reaches into his pants pocket. He pulls out two fives."I don't think we're going to get played today," says Ms. McKee.They crack up.To borrow Tina Turner's line, Spike Lee never seems to do anything nice and easy. Even when he starts out easy, things eventually get rough. Lately Mr. Lee has been fielding, and returning, shots about his film "Malcolm X," due in November.
NEWS
By Jill L. Kubatko and Jill L. Kubatko,Contributing writer | August 25, 1995
Dressed in their usual black shirts, sunglasses and black fedoras, Full Gospel Boogie Band will take the stage at 7:30 p.m. tomorrow at Westminster First Assembly of God.The Christian rock band, a cross between ZZ Top and the Blues Brothers with some Billy Graham thrown in, will perform with another local band, King James.The band includes Doug Briscoe on drums, Buck Wike on bass, Dan Tesch on guitar, Ray Remmers on keyboard and John Pepsin on guitar, harmonica and vocals.The band members are former nightclub musicians who have played full time, Mr. Pepsin said.
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By Ken Fuson and Ken Fuson,SUN STAFF | November 25, 1996
CHICAGO -- Oh, mama, look what they've done to the blues.You remember the blues, don't you? Sweet, sad music about lost love and flawed souls and sittin' on the dock of the bay, preferably played in smoky, dingy, dangerous joints where the only phone number you need is scrawled on the bathroom wall.Those days are gone. They end at 8: 30 p.m. Saturday in an explosion of fireworks from a barge on the Chicago River. They end when 1,500 media people and assorted guests witness the opening of a $20-plus million, 55,000-square-foot dance hall that looks like a combination of Tara, a Prague opera house and the Best Little Whorehouse in Texas.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | April 4, 2013
One of Pikesville's most charming and well-loved buildings - a 1937 Art Deco structure fronted by a stately marquee - could soon open its doors to movie patrons for the first time in 30 years. The Baltimore County Council will be asked on April 15 to approve a zoning measure that would allow two 80-seat theaters to be added to what currently is the Pikes Diner on Reisterstown Road. "Even though the Pikes Diner operated as a movie theater for many, many years, for some reason that's not currently one of the permitted uses of that facility," said County Councilwoman Vicki Almond, who has drafted a change to the current zoning classification that would rectify the oversight.
FEATURES
By Bob Strauss and Bob Strauss,LOS ANGELES DAILY NEWS | March 29, 1998
It's as if "Roseanne" never went off the air. Or, at least, as if Dan Conner never died.Four films featuring John Goodman, the big, versatile actor who co-starred in the wildly successful sitcom, have been released in the first 10 weeks of 1998.In "Fallen," he plays a cop on the trail of a supernatural killer. In "Blues Brothers 2000," the sequel to the 1980 car wreck and R&B comedy, Goodman can be spotted in the regulation black suit, shades and porkpie hat, belting out songs as he hasn't since his Broadway breakthrough, "Big River," 13 years ago.In "The Borrowers," a Gulliver-esque children's fantasy, 4-inch-tall sprites take on Goodman's greedy, full-size lawyer.
FEATURES
By Tamara Ikenberg and Tamara Ikenberg,SUN STAFF | October 5, 1998
Saturday Night Live" has a sketchy film legacy.The Coneheads, Pat and Stuart Smalley may have first appeared "live from New York," but they died at the box office. Only "The Blues Brothers" and "Wayne's World" made successful leaps from sketch to screen.Sustaining a one-note joke for two minutes is tough enough.But sustaining the same one-note joke for two hours is nearly impossible.That didn't stop the powers that be at the aged late-night institution from trying to score with "A Night at the Roxbury" on Friday.
FEATURES
By Bob Strauss and Bob Strauss,LOS ANGELES DAILY NEWS | March 29, 1998
It's as if "Roseanne" never went off the air. Or, at least, as if Dan Conner never died.Four films featuring John Goodman, the big, versatile actor who co-starred in the wildly successful sitcom, have been released in the first 10 weeks of 1998.In "Fallen," he plays a cop on the trail of a supernatural killer. In "Blues Brothers 2000," the sequel to the 1980 car wreck and R&B comedy, Goodman can be spotted in the regulation black suit, shades and porkpie hat, belting out songs as he hasn't since his Broadway breakthrough, "Big River," 13 years ago.In "The Borrowers," a Gulliver-esque children's fantasy, 4-inch-tall sprites take on Goodman's greedy, full-size lawyer.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | February 6, 1998
"Blues Brothers 2000" doesn't tell much of a story, but it makes for one smokin' concert.A sequel to the blues-soaked car-wreck that was the original "Blues Brothers," it brings back much of the surviving cast from that 1980 film, offers up a flimsy story line about how the surviving brother is dedicated to reviving the act, makes a half-hearted attempt to instill some family values, then sits back and lets the music take control.L Wise move -- one of many this surprisingly deft movie makes.
FEATURES
By Ken Fuson and Ken Fuson,SUN STAFF | November 25, 1996
CHICAGO -- Oh, mama, look what they've done to the blues.You remember the blues, don't you? Sweet, sad music about lost love and flawed souls and sittin' on the dock of the bay, preferably played in smoky, dingy, dangerous joints where the only phone number you need is scrawled on the bathroom wall.Those days are gone. They end at 8: 30 p.m. Saturday in an explosion of fireworks from a barge on the Chicago River. They end when 1,500 media people and assorted guests witness the opening of a $20-plus million, 55,000-square-foot dance hall that looks like a combination of Tara, a Prague opera house and the Best Little Whorehouse in Texas.
NEWS
By Jill L. Kubatko and Jill L. Kubatko,Contributing writer | August 25, 1995
Dressed in their usual black shirts, sunglasses and black fedoras, Full Gospel Boogie Band will take the stage at 7:30 p.m. tomorrow at Westminster First Assembly of God.The Christian rock band, a cross between ZZ Top and the Blues Brothers with some Billy Graham thrown in, will perform with another local band, King James.The band includes Doug Briscoe on drums, Buck Wike on bass, Dan Tesch on guitar, Ray Remmers on keyboard and John Pepsin on guitar, harmonica and vocals.The band members are former nightclub musicians who have played full time, Mr. Pepsin said.
FEATURES
By New York Daily News | April 28, 1992
"I hear you have to buy your way onto the radio," says Spike Lee. He flashes a smile."Well," says Lonette McKee. "How much do you have?"Mr. Lee reaches into his pants pocket. He pulls out two fives."I don't think we're going to get played today," says Ms. McKee.They crack up.To borrow Tina Turner's line, Spike Lee never seems to do anything nice and easy. Even when he starts out easy, things eventually get rough. Lately Mr. Lee has been fielding, and returning, shots about his film "Malcolm X," due in November.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Television Critic | December 27, 1992
It was one of those TV images that leaps out of the clutter and burns its way into that place in the back of the brain called shared memory: Bill Clinton in Blues Brothers' sunglasses, honking away on that big tenor sax, while a million late-night bright lights danced and glistened off his golden horn. It was hot. It was symbolic. And it was resonant all right.Clinton's saxophone-playing appearance on "The Arsenio Hall Show" in June, though, was widely mocked at the time by many members of the we-know-everything gang covering national politics.
NEWS
July 22, 2003
On July 11, 2003, MR. THOMAS M. MILLER, 58, of 900 Patterson Run Road, McConnellsburg, PA 17233, entered into rest at his residence in McConnellsburg, PA. He is the son of father J. Allen Miller of McConnellsburg, PA. and mother-Dorothy (Rothe) Miller (deceased). Mr. Miller, a graduate of Virginia Tech, was computer consultant who ran his own company TMM Enterprises, Inc., of McConnellsburg. He attended McConnellsburg United Presbyterian Church, was an avid outdoorsman and loved to travel.
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