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By Bill Burton | April 26, 1991
A 10-bluefish-a-day creel limit will go into effect in Maryland Monday. The Department of Natural Resources said the new restrictions will be implemented in both the Chesapeake and its tributaries and at the Ocean City and Assateague area.Delaware, Virginia and many other states along the Atlantic Coast already have similar creel limits in effect. The new limit makes no distinction in sizes of individual fish.The limit applies to each licensed fisherman aboard any boat, or fishing from shore, docks and such.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | July 5, 2012
Richard N. Novotny Sr., former executive director of the Maryland Saltwater Sportfishing Association who also lobbied on behalf of state recreational fishermen, died Sunday of kidney failure at Ivy Hall Geriatric & Rehabilitation Center in Middle River. The longtime Essex resident was 67. "He was highly regarded, and when Rich was in a leadership role, he helped form a strong relationship between [the Department of Natural Resources] and the Maryland Saltwater Sportfishing Association.
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SPORTS
By PETER BAKER | August 10, 1993
Sunday evening at dusk, the calm edge of the tide rip at Tolly Point was a busy place. Gulls rose and fell and screeched. Panicked baitfish cleared the surface, herded into the shallow water atop the bar by larger fish feeding eagerly.A few fishing boats idled beneath the birds on the edges of the frenzy, and some fishermen cast and caught while others simply watched.For more than a week each evening the scene had been repeated.The fishermen, surrounded by acres of rockfish, are faced with a dilemma: Should one cast hoping to catch a bluefish and risk mortally injuring a rockfish, or should one move on and pass up the certainty of catching some kind of fish?
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick, Special to The Baltimore Sun | September 10, 2010
The new restaurant Brique is easy to find. Once you're over the Bay Bridge, it's just one left turn onto Route 213, and a slight left onto North Commerce Street, the main drag of Centreville. Brique is up ahead on the right. It's just across from the pretty county courthouse, the state's oldest in continuous use. Its shady grounds look like the set for the kind of movie where Julia Roberts returns home and discovers what really matters. In that kind of movie, though, there is never a restaurant as sophisticated or as stimulating as Brique, which is capable of producing moments of ravishing pleasure over the course of an evening.
NEWS
By Sue Hayes and Sue Hayes,Contributing Writer | May 17, 1992
Bluefish is the fare in May.Blues, weighing up to 15 pounds, are migrating north from a leisurely stay in the South. After the long swim, they are lean and very hungry.Since there is little natural bait in the surf this time of year, the blues don't stay long. They come tearing close to the beach, chasing schools of sand eels, bunker or an early bunch of shiners. They may remain only 15 to 45 minutes, so the surf angler must be ready.To catch the blues, an angler must heave a long surf pole, 10 to 15 feet, as far as possible.
SPORTS
By Peter Baker | May 12, 1991
Slammer bluefish are making their best run in several years, and although the 12- to 18-pound fish have not schooled up, they are making for great sport from the Middle Grounds off Point Lookout up to the Bay Bridge area.What that means for avid bluefish anglers is a chance to win money or prizes in the Maryland Saltwater Sportfishermen's eighth annual Big Money Bluefish Tournament Saturday and next Sunday.The tournament is open to boats whose captains are members '' of the MSSA by the last skippers meeting Thursday.
NEWS
By Sue Hayes and Sue Hayes,Contributing Writer | October 4, 1992
Ocean City sees some of its best fishing in the fall. Anglers line the beaches, able to surf fish all day. No longer are the fishermen subject to time periods and regulations. As long as the fish are biting, anglers fish.The main objective on the beach is catching bluefish. These fish begin to migrate south, feeding on schools of finger mullet, shiners and alewifes. Bluefish are fat, mean and sassy, giving anglers lots of sport. The average-size blue in October is 2 to 6 pounds, with big blues coming in periodically from 9 to 20 pounds.
NEWS
By Sue Hayes and Sue Hayes,Contributing Writer | May 24, 1992
An Ocean City charter boat breaks through the inlet on its first offshore bluefishing trip. The fog lying over the eastern seaboard makes it seem more like a day in New England than a May day in Ocean City. But the anglers do not mind; their minds are on bluefish.The captain nervously scans the bit of the horizon he can see, hoping the fish are out there.Suddenly the fog lifts, and the sight is one of wonder. Just offshore of the Five Mile Buoy, as far as the eye can see, is a huge school of bluefish boiling on the surface.
NEWS
By Sue Hayes and Sue Hayes,Contributing Writer | September 6, 1992
Standing on a rock jetty on a crisp September morning watching the sea gulls dip into the water is rewarding in itself. To suddenly see a school of finger mullet break water with a swirl of larger fish behind them is exhilarating.If you are a fisherman with a rod and reel in hand and a bucktail and plastic worm on the end of the line, this could mean dinner.In one possible scenario, a fisherman casts slightly up current of the activity and lets the bucktail sink below the surface. Then he begins a jerking motion with his rod tip, tempting the swirling fish into action.
NEWS
By Sue Hayes and Sue Hayes,Contributing Writer | May 3, 1992
Anglers awaiting the arrival of the bluefish were moved to abrupt action as a huge school of fish suddenly appeared at the Ocean City Inlet last Sunday afternoon. The Inlet came alive with boiling bluefish, chopping at almost anything thrown at them. The fish, running 2 to 4 pounds, were taking bucktails, plugs, spoons or bait.Mark Fleming of Delmarva Sporting Center grabbed his boat and found the blues boiling around the Old Railroad Bridge. Casting chunks of bunker and herring, Mr. Fleming and a friend caught 30 blues weighing in at 5 to 7 pounds.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SUN STAFF | July 23, 2005
Greenpeace has launched flotillas of seafaring activists to save whales in the Arctic Ocean and frustrate nuclear bomb testing in the Pacific. Today, the international environmental action group plans to send protesters in boats with a more humble goal: saving the Chesapeake Bay's population of a cigar-sized bait fish called menhaden. Organizers of the 34-year-old Amsterdam-based organization say they are set to send about 50 people with a giant floating fish skeleton and signs reading "Floating factory fishing is overkill" in 15 boats beside a Reedville, Va., menhaden processing plant.
NEWS
By ROB KASPER | September 1, 2004
MY OPINION OF Maryland bluefish changed when I caught one. Until then, I had considered the fish virtually inedible. Now I crave it. The seismic shift occurred last week on a day when both the waters of the Chesapeake Bay and the sky above it were carefree blue. Bobbing on a boat near the mouth of the Severn River, I reeled in the fish - about 12 inches long - and marveled at its fierce fight and its brilliant color. Its hues were closer to marine green than deep blue. Bluefish are bluer when they are swimming in New England.
NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | August 12, 2004
CASCO BAY, Maine -- "Do you summer on the island?" the stranger asks me as we walk down the ramp to load our bags onto the ferry. It's mid-August and I have come here after a scattered June and workaholic July to snatch a pair of weeks as if they were aces from a stacked deck of cards. Hauling my last bag full of books, I don't know what to say to this woman. I am tempted to tell her, "I don't summer." In my mind, people who used summer as a verb belonged to another century. They were upstairs folks when my family was decidedly downstairs.
SPORTS
By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,SUN STAFF | May 23, 1999
For 16 seasons, the Maryland Saltwater Sportfishermen's Association has held its annual spring tournament on Chesapeake Bay. In the early years, while rockfish were recovering from overfishing, the focus was bluefish, the big choppers that harried baitfish from Point Lookout northward."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kathryn Higham and Kathryn Higham,Special to the Sun | May 6, 1999
Briny Chesapeake oysters have been a culinary draw at Maryland restaurants for ages. One would think they'd be the highlight of a meal at O'Brien's Oyster Bar and Grill in Annapolis, considering its name.On a recent weeknight, we put that theory to a test. We sat down for a meal at O'Brien's and ordered oysters three ways.The first to arrive were icy-cold raw oysters on the half-shell. They were exactly what we hoped for -- fresh, plump and beautiful. But the baked oysters Rockefeller were hindered by a dense cap of spinach, and the fried oysters were overcooked.
SPORTS
By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,SUN STAFF | March 14, 1999
This month, before the weather warms and anglers are more disposed toward boats and shorelines than classrooms, several seminars can help fine tune fishing skills for rockfish and blues, largemouth and smallmouth bass.Keith Walters, former holder of the state record for rockfish, leads off successive weekends of classes with Fishing Tips, Tackle and Techniques on Saturday at Chesapeake College in Wye Mills.Walters, who has written several books about fishing for Chesapeake Bay species, said he has structured this course to help the average angler.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | July 31, 1991
Try as I might, I can't warm up to bluefish. I've tried it broiled. I've tried it baked. Over the weekend I gave it the ultimate test. I bathed two bluefish fillets in my favorite fish marinade -- lime juice, garlic, olive oil, soy and vermouth -- and grilled them. They looked great. They tasted so-so.It is with great sadness that I admit that I don't care for bluefish, one of the best known denizens of the nearby Chesapeake Bay. Doing so marks me as an outsider, as someone "who is not really from around here."
SPORTS
By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,SUN STAFF | October 23, 1997
Through much of late summer and early fall, smallish bluefish have been marauding through chum lines, snapping up baits intended for other species and stripping bucktails and feather jigs with great regularity. But the arrival of cooler weather this week will have them heading south, and one has to hope they will return next year a little larger.Spring runs of big bluefish have been virtually nonexistent for a number of years and recent summers and falls have produced mostly smaller blues.
SPORTS
By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,SUN STAFF | September 13, 1998
All week, gusty winds had made fishing from a small boat tough on Chesapeake Bay, but by sunrise Friday the northwesterlies had subsided and by midmorning a large cooler might have been expected to be filled with bluefish.Instead, all of the few dozen 1- and 2-pounders caught from various breaking schools between the mouth of West River and the Farewell Buoy at the Severn River had been released. They are, after all, the future of a capricious species that could be making a minor comeback along the Atlantic Coast and in Chesapeake Bay."
SPORTS
By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,SUN STAFF | September 11, 1998
Maryland opens an experimental hunting season for green-winged or blue-winged teal in areas of the state east of I-95 tomorrow. The season, which has a four-duck daily limit, runs through Sept. 22, excluding Sunday hunting.The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service offered the special season to states in which 80 percent of the teal harvest comes from mid-continent nesting areas. The season dates are in addition to the normal duck seasons that open in October.Hunting for all other waterfowl is illegal during the September teal season, except for resident Canada geese.
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