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Bluefin Tuna

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NEWS
By Sue Hayes and Sue Hayes,Special to The Sun | August 14, 1994
Ocean City's famous White Marlin Open Tournament was followed by even more good offshore fishing. Though chunking for bluefin tuna was sporadic there were some good catches.Scott Stine of York, Pa., picked up a 92-pound bluefin tuna while chunking approximately five miles east of the Jack Spot with butterfish. He was fishing aboard the private boat Daddy's Toy. A 128 1/2 -bluefin tuna was taken by Greg Anderson of Edgewood while fishing aboard the Dollar Bill out of the Fishing Center. He was also chunking southeast of the Jack Spot.
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FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | August 6, 2014
The dark specks swirling around in big water-filled tanks at the Columbus Center hardly look like fish, much less the kings of the ocean. But from these tiny beginnings, a team of Maryland scientists hopes to unlock the secrets of "farming" Atlantic bluefin tuna, one of the most prized fish on the planet — and one of the most threatened. "For me, it's the Holy Grail," said Yonathan Zohar, a professor of marine biotechnology with the University of Maryland, Baltimore County and head of the aquaculture research center at the Institute for Marine and Environmental Technology at the Inner Harbor.
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FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | August 6, 2014
The dark specks swirling around in big water-filled tanks at the Columbus Center hardly look like fish, much less the kings of the ocean. But from these tiny beginnings, a team of Maryland scientists hopes to unlock the secrets of "farming" Atlantic bluefin tuna, one of the most prized fish on the planet — and one of the most threatened. "For me, it's the Holy Grail," said Yonathan Zohar, a professor of marine biotechnology with the University of Maryland, Baltimore County and head of the aquaculture research center at the Institute for Marine and Environmental Technology at the Inner Harbor.
NEWS
April 13, 2010
I've spent my whole life living and often fishing along the Atlantic Seaboard. My most exciting experience was catching a 900-pound giant bluefin tuna off the coast of Massachusetts 10 years ago — an epic, 75-minute battle I'll never forget. So it bothers me that nearly all the fish I purchase for my seafood distribution company for Washington, D.C. -area restaurants must come from Alaska and the Pacific. But I only source seafood from healthy, sustainable fisheries, and the sad fact is most East Coast species are severely depleted.
NEWS
By Bruce Henderson and Bruce Henderson,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | August 23, 2001
CHARLOTTE, N.C. - North Carolina-based research into bluefin tuna, the world's most valuable fish, offers new evidence that international fishing limits are too high to rebuild their shrunken numbers. Since 1996, North Carolina sport fishermen have worked with researchers to implant electronic tracking tags into the bluefins that congregate off Cape Hatteras and Cape Lookout each winter. The findings, published recently in the journal Science, shed extraordinary light on the ocean-roaming nomads.
NEWS
By Sue Hayes and Sue Hayes,Special to The Sun | June 26, 1994
The first white marlin of the season made their appearance here last week.The very first fish was caught and released by angler Brent Hofmann of Columbia aboard the Searoamer last weekend. Brent and his father and captain of the boat, Ron Hofmann, hooked the fish north of the Washington Canyon in 36 fathoms of water. They were trolling a ballyhoo for bait. That same weekend six other white marlin were caught.Anglers have been catching mako sharks for several weeks, luring them with whole mackerel baits, slabs of bluefish filet and whole bunker.
NEWS
By John E. Woodruff and John E. Woodruff,Staff Writer | March 13, 1992
KYOTO, Japan -- The Japanese liked the idea of playing host to this year's meeting of people concerned about protecting endangered species.Trouble is, they also adore things made of ivory. They share the peculiar Asian passion for particular parts of bears. And the rest of the world's anxiety about the waning bluefin tuna population is overwhelmed by the Japanese craving for sushi -- which is what that fish becomes when it's attached to a blob of vinegared rice and dabbed with horseradish.
SPORTS
By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,SUN STAFF | June 22, 1997
OCEAN CITY -- As the first boats came to the scales late Thursday afternoon on the first day of the annual O.C. Shark Tournament, murmurs of expectation spread through the more than 200 spectators gathered on the deck near the Flying Fish Saloon.Mark Sampson, the tournament director, who has popularized shark fishing over the years at Maryland's bustling oceanside resort, had relayed committee boat reports of good catches of blue and mako shark coming in, and the crowd at the Ocean City Fishing Center was anxious and curious.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 15, 1998
PACIFIC GROVE, Calif. - Late last winter, in 8-foot seas 20 miles off Cape Hatteras, N.C., Dr. Barbara Block, a Stanford University marine biologist, and two teams of sometimes seasick researchers undertook a bold experiment. They spent five weeks wrestling more than 200 fish in the 300- to 500-pound class to the lurching decks of tiny charter fishing boats.In rapid-fire movements carefully orchestrated to minimize the time the tuna were kept out of the water, they implanted two new types of computerized tags - 40 that pop up and disconnect from the fish after gathering data, and 160 that remain implanted and are removed only when the fish are caught.
SPORTS
June 18, 1992
NEW BLUEFIN TUNA REGULATIONSThe National Marine Fisheries Service has implemented the following regulations for bluefin tuna catches:Giant -- more than 77 inches fork length -- one per boat per day with permit.Medium -- 57 to 77 inches fork length -- one per angler, two per boat.School -- less than 57 inches fork length -- two per angler if no medium taken.NAMES AND PLACES* If you are planning to fish the catwalk at Conowingo Dam, remember that new restrictions on bait go into effect this week.
NEWS
By Erica Marcus and Erica Marcus,Newsday | February 20, 2008
What's up with the mercury in tuna? Can I still eat it? I've gotten many tuna-related questions in the wake of revelations that tuna from local grocery and restaurant sources showed surprisingly high levels of methylmercury when tested in the lab. Methylmercury in a pregnant or nursing woman's diet can put her child at risk for neurological damage. Young children should also limit their intake, as well as women who are planning to get pregnant. Whether methylmercury poses a health risk for adults is still up in the air - some studies have indicated it might contribute to heart disease or neurological disorders, but other studies have found no effect.
NEWS
By Bruce Henderson and Bruce Henderson,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | August 23, 2001
CHARLOTTE, N.C. - North Carolina-based research into bluefin tuna, the world's most valuable fish, offers new evidence that international fishing limits are too high to rebuild their shrunken numbers. Since 1996, North Carolina sport fishermen have worked with researchers to implant electronic tracking tags into the bluefins that congregate off Cape Hatteras and Cape Lookout each winter. The findings, published recently in the journal Science, shed extraordinary light on the ocean-roaming nomads.
NEWS
By Chris Guy and Chris Guy,SUN STAFF | April 27, 1999
Federal authorities unveiled yesterday the first comprehensive management plan aimed at restoring dwindling Atlantic stocks of migratory fish such as swordfish, sharks, tuna and marlin.The National Marine Fisheries Service effort, an attempt to reverse years of overfishing of many ocean species, was described as a comprehensive process that involved more than 5,000 environmentalists and commercial and recreational fishermen who testified during 27 public hearings in the past six months.The managed species include Atlantic bluefin, bigeye, yellowfin, albacore and skipjack tuna, Atlantic swordfish and 72 species of shark in U.S. waters from Maine to Texas.
SPORTS
By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,SUN STAFF | July 16, 1998
The early fishing seasons for rockfish closed Sunday on the Chesapeake Bay and its tributaries, but fishermen who frequent the tidewater needn't pack it in until the fall season opens Aug. 15 because there still are excellent angling opportunities.Among the best fishing news for bay anglers is an influx of sea trout over the past several days, including large numbers over 20 inches in length."We had expected to see good numbers of weakfish [sea trout] to 20 inches this summer," said DNR Fisheries Service biologist Martin L. Gary.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 15, 1998
PACIFIC GROVE, Calif. - Late last winter, in 8-foot seas 20 miles off Cape Hatteras, N.C., Dr. Barbara Block, a Stanford University marine biologist, and two teams of sometimes seasick researchers undertook a bold experiment. They spent five weeks wrestling more than 200 fish in the 300- to 500-pound class to the lurching decks of tiny charter fishing boats.In rapid-fire movements carefully orchestrated to minimize the time the tuna were kept out of the water, they implanted two new types of computerized tags - 40 that pop up and disconnect from the fish after gathering data, and 160 that remain implanted and are removed only when the fish are caught.
SPORTS
By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,SUN STAFF | August 21, 1997
While goose hunters in the Atlantic Flyway can expect to pursue resident Canada geese over an expanded season in some parts of the state this fall and winter, hunters elsewhere in the nation will be gunning for migrants.The reason, of course, is that the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has suspended the hunting season in Atlantic Flyway states while the flyway's population of migratory Canada geese rebuilds. In the past three years, the number of breeding pairs has increased from a low of 29,000 to 63,000.
NEWS
By Boston Globe | March 3, 1992
TOKYO -- Should South Africa, Namibia, Botswana and Zimbabwe -- which unlike other African nations have zealously enforced wildlife conservation laws, battled heavily armed poaching gangs and, as a result, boast flourishing herds of elephants -- be allowed to resume a limited trade in elephant parts?Will Japanese gourmets of raw fish see bluefin tuna, prized as a $78-a-sliver delicacy here, disappear from sushi bars because of a proposed ban on trade in the species, whose numbers in the Atlantic have declined dangerously over the past decade?
SPORTS
By Peter Baker | June 18, 1992
NEW BLUEFIN TUNA REGULATIONSThe National Marine Fisheries Service has implemented the following regulations for bluefin tuna catches:Giant -- more than 77 inches fork length -- one per boat per day with permit.Medium -- 57 to 77 inches fork length -- one per angler, two per boat.School -- less than 57 inches fork length -- two per angler if no medium taken.NAMES AND PLACES* If you are planning to fish the catwalk at Conowingo Dam, remember that new restrictions on bait go into effect this week.
SPORTS
By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,SUN STAFF | June 22, 1997
OCEAN CITY -- As the first boats came to the scales late Thursday afternoon on the first day of the annual O.C. Shark Tournament, murmurs of expectation spread through the more than 200 spectators gathered on the deck near the Flying Fish Saloon.Mark Sampson, the tournament director, who has popularized shark fishing over the years at Maryland's bustling oceanside resort, had relayed committee boat reports of good catches of blue and mako shark coming in, and the crowd at the Ocean City Fishing Center was anxious and curious.
SPORTS
By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,SUN STAFF | July 25, 1996
Hurricane Bertha forced the rescheduling of the Ocean City Tuna Tournament to last weekend, and, according to weigh-master Bill Runkle, the postponement resulted in "the most numerous and some of the heaviest fish we've weighed over the past five years."Wes Denton of Baltimore caught a 179-pound bluefin tuna, which won the largest single tuna category for Team Cummins and earned a prize of $16,575. Team Cummins was fishing aboard the Liquidator.Despite the one-week postponement, rough weather kept many of the 51 boats entered inshore of the canyons and brought mostly bluefin tuna to the scales at the Ocean City Fishing Center.
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