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BUSINESS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,SUN STAFF | November 13, 1999
Representatives from CareFirst BlueCross BlueShield, the Owings Mills-based health insurer, and its Delaware counterpart hope to convince Maryland regulators next week that policyholders would benefit from an alliance between the two companies.If approved by Maryland and Delaware regulators, the deal would make CareFirst Inc., the parent of the former Maryland BlueCross BlueShield, the largest not-for-profit managed care company in the mid-Atlantic, with 2.7 million subscribers in Maryland, Delaware and the Washington area.
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HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn and Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | November 20, 2013
CareFirst BlueCross BlueShield said Wednesday that it would offer more than 55,500 customers the chance to extend their healthcare plans for another year, even though the policies don't comply with the federal Affordable Care Act. Maryland's insurance commissioner had told insurers a day earlier that such a move would be legal, and last week a beleaguered President Barack Obama asked states and insurers to consider the extensions. The president had promised Americans that if they liked their plans, they could keep them.
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BUSINESS
By JAY HANCOCK | July 23, 2003
SOME statements made by directors of CareFirst BlueCross BlueShield in yesterday's editions of The Sun were true, such as this one by former Baltimore Development Corp. chief Roger C. Lipitz: "People may disagree with the decisions that we made." Some statements were untrue. Here is an example: "The best thing that ever happened to the policyholders of BlueCross BlueShield is Bill Jews." Former state Sen. James C. Simpson said that, and here is something else he said in the same vein: "We feel like we've been chastised for making an insolvent company solvent."
NEWS
September 21, 2010
The article in the business section "Primary care gets a boost in pay" (Sept. 21) is an interesting concept. It would be even more interesting to see how behavioral health care is integrated into this system, in a meaningful way, since most patients who are high users of the medical system and high cost usually have a co-occurring mental illness, substance abuse and/or a cognitive/intellectual disorder as well. Revising an integrated plan of care and monitoring the patient's progress is one thing, but in order to know how effective the treatment is also depends on a quality component such as the use of specific outcome measures that are realistic and measurable.
NEWS
May 25, 2003
WHILE LAWYERS dueled in federal court Friday over the future of Maryland's largest health insurance company, a taped message at CareFirst BlueCross BlueShield's Owings Mills headquarters greeted callers with a message of reassurance: Medical coverage and benefits for its 3.2 million customers remain in effect as usual. Believe it. Continuity of care for CareFirst customers is a priority on which all of the parties in what may be a long-running legal battle agree. Some changes could ultimately result if the national Blue Cross and Blue Shield Association succeeds in yanking the Blues trademark from CareFirst.
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | October 5, 2004
Maryland's insurance commissioner rejected a plan yesterday that would have allowed Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Delaware a looser affiliation with CareFirst BlueCross BlueShield, saying he was concerned the plan could hurt CareFirst and its Maryland subscribers. The decision by Commissioner Alfred W. Redmer Jr. could lead to the Delaware plan splitting from CareFirst altogether - which Redmer said he wasn't opposed to, as long as CareFirst receives fair compensation - or to another attempt to fashion a relationship that regulators will approve.
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | March 15, 2005
CareFirst BlueCross BlueShield - which has already promised to become less profitable to boost its nonprofit mission - posted $178.8 million in net income in 2004, according to filings with insurance regulators. The number isn't a surprise. CareFirst officials told legislators at a January briefing that the bottom line would be about $175 million. It's slightly higher (4.4 percent) than the $171.3 million in net income CareFirst recorded in 2003. Revenue, almost all from premiums and administrative fees, was $4.7 billion, up about 8 percent from the previous year.
NEWS
By Dan Thanh Dang and Dan Thanh Dang,SUN STAFF | June 5, 2003
A U.S. District Court judge extended a stay yesterday in the CareFirst BlueCross BlueShield legal dispute to give the company more time to discuss possible adjustments to a deal designed to preserve its license to provide national coverage to 3.2 million subscribers. The deal has been accepted by Maryland officials and representatives of the national Blue Cross association, but CareFirst officials balked when it was presented to them yesterday. The tentative settlement reached late Tuesday would soften a reform law, which the association said amounted to a state takeover of CareFirst.
NEWS
By A. G. Newmyer III | January 16, 2002
FOLKS WHO run charitable, nonprofit organizations are supposed to focus on the needs of the beneficiaries, not themselves. In particular, they are not supposed to divert public assets for private gain. As my kids would say, "Duh!" These facts are so obvious that it seems odd to repeat them. But they do seem to have eluded the management and board of CareFirst BlueCross BlueShield, the nonprofit holding company for the Blue Cross plans in our region, whose plan to sell out to WellPoint Health Networks in California for $1.3 billion is an affront to the public interest.
NEWS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | May 24, 2003
The warring parties in the CareFirst BlueCross BlueShield dispute - the state, the national Blue Cross association and CareFirst itself - agreed yesterday to an 11-day cooling-off period, ensuring that CareFirst's 3.2 million subscribers will have no immediate disruption in their coverage. In the interim, the three parties will try to resolve their differences over Maryland legislation aimed at reforming CareFirst. The agreement was hammered out by three squads of lawyers in the chambers of Judge J. Frederick Motz in federal court in Baltimore and signed by Motz as an order.
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | March 15, 2005
CareFirst BlueCross BlueShield - which has already promised to become less profitable to boost its nonprofit mission - posted $178.8 million in net income in 2004, according to filings with insurance regulators. The number isn't a surprise. CareFirst officials told legislators at a January briefing that the bottom line would be about $175 million. It's slightly higher (4.4 percent) than the $171.3 million in net income CareFirst recorded in 2003. Revenue, almost all from premiums and administrative fees, was $4.7 billion, up about 8 percent from the previous year.
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | October 5, 2004
Maryland's insurance commissioner rejected a plan yesterday that would have allowed Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Delaware a looser affiliation with CareFirst BlueCross BlueShield, saying he was concerned the plan could hurt CareFirst and its Maryland subscribers. The decision by Commissioner Alfred W. Redmer Jr. could lead to the Delaware plan splitting from CareFirst altogether - which Redmer said he wasn't opposed to, as long as CareFirst receives fair compensation - or to another attempt to fashion a relationship that regulators will approve.
BUSINESS
By JAY HANCOCK | July 23, 2003
SOME statements made by directors of CareFirst BlueCross BlueShield in yesterday's editions of The Sun were true, such as this one by former Baltimore Development Corp. chief Roger C. Lipitz: "People may disagree with the decisions that we made." Some statements were untrue. Here is an example: "The best thing that ever happened to the policyholders of BlueCross BlueShield is Bill Jews." Former state Sen. James C. Simpson said that, and here is something else he said in the same vein: "We feel like we've been chastised for making an insolvent company solvent."
NEWS
By Dan Thanh Dang and Dan Thanh Dang,SUN STAFF | June 5, 2003
A U.S. District Court judge extended a stay yesterday in the CareFirst BlueCross BlueShield legal dispute to give the company more time to discuss possible adjustments to a deal designed to preserve its license to provide national coverage to 3.2 million subscribers. The deal has been accepted by Maryland officials and representatives of the national Blue Cross association, but CareFirst officials balked when it was presented to them yesterday. The tentative settlement reached late Tuesday would soften a reform law, which the association said amounted to a state takeover of CareFirst.
NEWS
May 25, 2003
WHILE LAWYERS dueled in federal court Friday over the future of Maryland's largest health insurance company, a taped message at CareFirst BlueCross BlueShield's Owings Mills headquarters greeted callers with a message of reassurance: Medical coverage and benefits for its 3.2 million customers remain in effect as usual. Believe it. Continuity of care for CareFirst customers is a priority on which all of the parties in what may be a long-running legal battle agree. Some changes could ultimately result if the national Blue Cross and Blue Shield Association succeeds in yanking the Blues trademark from CareFirst.
NEWS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | May 24, 2003
The warring parties in the CareFirst BlueCross BlueShield dispute - the state, the national Blue Cross association and CareFirst itself - agreed yesterday to an 11-day cooling-off period, ensuring that CareFirst's 3.2 million subscribers will have no immediate disruption in their coverage. In the interim, the three parties will try to resolve their differences over Maryland legislation aimed at reforming CareFirst. The agreement was hammered out by three squads of lawyers in the chambers of Judge J. Frederick Motz in federal court in Baltimore and signed by Motz as an order.
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | February 7, 2003
Facing sometimes-hostile legislators, CareFirst BlueCross BlueShield Chief Executive Officer William L. Jews said yesterday that if his company is not sold, it would be fine in the short term, but its service would deteriorate as it lost market share to larger national competitors. Members of the House Health and Government Operations committee, however, expressed interest not in CareFirst's potential problems but in ways to help it make health insurance more available and affordable if the proposed sale is blocked.
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | November 9, 2000
CareFirst BlueCross Blue- Shield, the state's largest health insurer, announced yesterday that it is buying Preferred Health Network, an 85,000-member health plan based in Linthicum. For PHN, the sale solves a sticky financial problem. The plan had been under orders since August to increase its financial reserves. According to the order issued by Steven B. Larsen, state insurance commissioner, PHN was required to maintain a surplus of $2.79 million but, as of June 30, had only $44,123.
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | February 7, 2003
Facing sometimes-hostile legislators, CareFirst BlueCross BlueShield Chief Executive Officer William L. Jews said yesterday that if his company is not sold, it would be fine in the short term, but its service would deteriorate as it lost market share to larger national competitors. Members of the House Health and Government Operations committee, however, expressed interest not in CareFirst's potential problems but in ways to help it make health insurance more available and affordable if the proposed sale is blocked.
NEWS
By A. G. Newmyer III | January 16, 2002
FOLKS WHO run charitable, nonprofit organizations are supposed to focus on the needs of the beneficiaries, not themselves. In particular, they are not supposed to divert public assets for private gain. As my kids would say, "Duh!" These facts are so obvious that it seems odd to repeat them. But they do seem to have eluded the management and board of CareFirst BlueCross BlueShield, the nonprofit holding company for the Blue Cross plans in our region, whose plan to sell out to WellPoint Health Networks in California for $1.3 billion is an affront to the public interest.
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