Advertisement
HomeCollectionsBlueberries
IN THE NEWS

Blueberries

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
By Meekah Hopkins | August 24, 2011
Every summer, I am reminded of the gigantic crush I have on the Crush. You know, the fruit-juice-and-vodka-cocktail that's known as a Baltimore specialty. You can find them all over city, usually in the Orange Crush variety. But Orange can be a little, well, boring. And so, like a lusty teenage girl might, I drop it quickly when a new, more interesting flavor comes along. This year, my fling is with the Blueberry Acai Mojito Crush at Ryleigh's Oyster in Federal Hill. Ryleigh's has become the gold standard of Crushes, though several city spots claim theirs to be its birthplace.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
August 26, 2013
(Courtesy of Jenny Perez) Makes 2 servings 2 cups unsweetened vanilla almond milk 1 cup of fresh blueberries 1 cup of fresh strawberries 1-2 scoops of vanilla protein powder 2 heaping tbsps of almond butter 1 or 2 dates -- optional depending on how sweet you like it (Dates will give smoothies a sweet caramel flavor and help to strengthen muscles.) 1 cup of filtered ice or frozen blueberries Put all ingredients into a blender and purée until smooth. Pour into glasses and serve.
Advertisement
FEATURES
By Ellen Nibali, Special to The Baltimore Sun | March 22, 2012
I plan to plant 20 low-bush blueberries. I've prepared the beds with leaf mulch, compost and sulfur. How do you recommend planting to maximize survival? We hope you have not purchased these plants yet, as we suggest that you plant Northern or Southern high-bush blueberries instead. Low-bush blueberries are essentially wild, woodland plants that are not cultivated so much as maintained by growers in New England. One reason it's difficult to grow low-bush berries in our area is that we have different mycorrhizae (beneficial soil fungi)
EXPLORE
AEGIS STAFF REPORT | July 9, 2013
Deer Creek Friends Meeting of the Religious Society of Friends will host its 16th Annual Blueberry Festival at its meetinghouse, at 1212 Main St. in Darlington, on Saturday, July 13 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. The annual event will offer homemade blueberry pies, baked goods and blueberry desserts in addition to fresh berries. There will also be an 11 a.m. live auction, a white elephant table, native plant sale and hamburgers, hot dogs and drinks. Spring Valley Farm of Conowingo provides the berries for the wide range of baked goods so popular with attendees.
NEWS
By JOE AND TERESA GRAEDON | April 27, 2009
I've heard that blueberries have a beneficial effect on the brain. Can you tell me more about this? Is the research recent and credible? James Joseph, Ph.D., at Tufts University is a leading neuroscientist and expert on the effects of berries on brain function. He has done a number of studies in both aging rodents and humans demonstrating cognitive benefits from blueberries. We see this research as highly credible (Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, Feb. 13, 2008). Joseph recommends frozen berries as an economical way to get the antioxidant potential of this fruit.
FEATURES
July 26, 1998
Q.Half of my 14 blueberry plants are dying. More than half the leaves dropped off or never developed. They also produced poorly last year. We use a well, so we couldn't water them during the drought. Will they recover?A.They may and they may not. Blueberries have shallow root systems and no root hairs, so they cannot tolerate dry soil conditions. The symptoms you're seeing are probably a result of the 1997 drought.Keep the plants well-watered but don't fertilize. Remove them this summer if they become completely defoliated and don't put on any new growth.
FEATURES
By Ellen Creager and Ellen Creager,Knight-Ridder News Service | August 11, 1993
They add color and flavor, and they're among the easiest fruits to prepare. Just rinse and they're ready. So it's time to stop confining blueberries to muffins or Sunday morning pancakes and experiment a little.Blueberries work equally well in fruit salads and green salads. They're a sturdy fruit that hold their shape well, so they can be tossed with abandon. Try them in a sorbet, mix them with nectarines for an innovative poultry stuffing or enjoy them simply with a little chevre on crackers.
FEATURES
By Rob Kasper | October 1, 1997
WHILE I HAVE long believed the adage that "the best fruit is at the top of the tree," I have rarely put this belief into practice. I wasn't willing to climb very high or work very hard to get the good stuff.I figured that if a fruit chose to reside in some hard-to-reach location, it was a sign that the fruit, like Greta Garbo, wanted to be left alone. I was content to feast on life's conveniently-located fruit.Until last weekend. That was when I tasted wild blueberries fetched from a remote island in the middle of a distant New Hampshire lake.
NEWS
By Susan Reimer and Susan Reimer,Sun reporter | June 25, 2008
A series to help you cook with the bounty of the season. It's blueberry season, a time for filling pails and pie shells. From now until the first week in August, home cooks can visit farms in just about every county of Maryland and load their buckets with blueberries for about $2 a pound. Or, if you are Carol Kressen of Ellicott City, you can step into your yard, where a half-dozen blueberry bushes planted by the home's previous owner produce more blueberries than your three children can eat - or sell.
NEWS
By Elinor Klivans and Elinor Klivans,Special to the Sun | June 16, 2002
Grunt, slump and buckle may sound like some exhausting exercise class, but they are really traditional blueberry desserts. Cozy Cape Cod grunts and New England slumps consist of soft dumplings steamed on top of bubbling blueberries, and the buckle is a crumb-topped blueberry cake. Fortunately, the most grueling exercise involved is lifting your fork to enjoy them. Blueberries are usually packed in pints, which yield about two cups of blueberries. Look for blueberries shipped in clear plastic "clamshell" containers, which protect the berries from being crushed or bruised.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Evan Siple | May 7, 2013
One of the most appealing things about liquor is its ability to absorb flavors. Whether bacon, fruit or oak, the process of infusion can make any run-of-the-mill vodka a taste sensation, given the right proportions and enough time. While leather-infused bourbon may seem like an unapproachable or acquired taste (it does exist, for the record), you can never go wrong with a good old fashioned fruit infusion. Many drinkeries around the Baltimore area have their own varieties. In Federal Hill, Mother's Grille has the Summertime Infusion.
FEATURES
By Ellen Nibali, Special to The Baltimore Sun | March 22, 2012
I plan to plant 20 low-bush blueberries. I've prepared the beds with leaf mulch, compost and sulfur. How do you recommend planting to maximize survival? We hope you have not purchased these plants yet, as we suggest that you plant Northern or Southern high-bush blueberries instead. Low-bush blueberries are essentially wild, woodland plants that are not cultivated so much as maintained by growers in New England. One reason it's difficult to grow low-bush berries in our area is that we have different mycorrhizae (beneficial soil fungi)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Julie Rothman, Special to The Baltimore Sun | August 29, 2011
Mary Harris from Nottingham was looking for recipe she has lost for a blueberry breakfast cake made in a loaf pan. Gladys Wilt from Lothian sent in a recipe she had for Alabama Blueberry Bread that she thinks is really great and that Harris might want to try. The bread is very easy to make and little bit out of the ordinary. It is an interesting cross between a classic blueberry teacake and spice cake. I also liked that the recipe had you crush some of the berries before adding them to the batter because it gave the cake a lovely color.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Meekah Hopkins | August 24, 2011
Every summer, I am reminded of the gigantic crush I have on the Crush. You know, the fruit-juice-and-vodka-cocktail that's known as a Baltimore specialty. You can find them all over city, usually in the Orange Crush variety. But Orange can be a little, well, boring. And so, like a lusty teenage girl might, I drop it quickly when a new, more interesting flavor comes along. This year, my fling is with the Blueberry Acai Mojito Crush at Ryleigh's Oyster in Federal Hill. Ryleigh's has become the gold standard of Crushes, though several city spots claim theirs to be its birthplace.
EXPLORE
By Kathy Hudson | July 23, 2011
1) Pull down the shades. Our south and west windows have had the blinds down most of the week. We feel like moles, but it helps keep the baking sun out. 2) Eat cold food. When temps in Paris reached 97 degrees, my niece and I went to a bakery and bought slices of quiche from the refrigerated case and ate them unheated. Later we had ice cream to cool us down as we walked.  My husband and I have been enjoying ice cream here in Baltimore too, at Uncle Wiggly's in Mt. Washington Mill and at Poulet , where they have homemade flavors.
EXPLORE
By AEGIS STAFF REPORT | July 18, 2011
It was another hot, sultry summer weekend with plenty to do in Harford County, especially on Saturday. Saturday morning at Bynum Run Park in Bel Air, the pond was ringed with young people and a few helpful parents trying their luck in the seventh annual Kids Fishing Festival sponsored by Port City Bass Anglers. The pond was stocked for the occasion, and the turnout was excellent, according to event organizers. Several miles north of the county seat, the annual Blueberry Festival to benefit Harford Friends School was held from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Deer Creek Friends Meetinghouse on Main Street in Darlington.
NEWS
By Jeffrey Dieter and Jeffrey Dieter,SUN STAFF | August 22, 2004
We live in a world of designer everything - from shoes to scarfs, watches to weights, cologne to cars, and toilet seats to tank tops. The dirt we sink our snake plants and ferns into is no longer an exception. Move over Pro-Mix and Miracle-Gro, there's a new kid in town. It's called Cobscook Blend, a potting soil manufactured by Coast of Maine Organic Products Inc. of Portland, Maine. It sells for $6.99 for a 16-quart bag - weighing about 13 pounds - at the Whole Foods Markets in Mount Washington and Fells Point.
NEWS
By Cassandra A. Fortin and Cassandra A. Fortin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 10, 2005
Brittnee Connor rubbed her stomach and popped blueberries into her mouth as fast as she could pick them. "Booberries are yummy, yummy, yummy," she said, pronouncing as well as any 5-year-old with a mouthful of fruit. Her brother was of a like mind. Flashing a big blue smile, 4-year-old Logan added: "I like it when my mouth turns blue." The Connor children and their mother, Marcie, traveled recently from Annapolis to Spring Valley Farm in Conowingo. They joined record crowds at pick-your-own farms in Harford and Cecil counties for the opening of blueberry season.
EXPLORE
By Aegis correspondent | July 13, 2011
Vacation Bible School at Franklin Baptist Church from July 25-29 from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. for kids ages 4 - 17 with transportation available by calling Rick Wilson at 410-378-5346. The church is at 2106 Franklin Church Road in Darlington. All are welcome to attend. Vacation Bible School will be Aug. 1 through Aug. 5 at the Dublin United Methodist Church. A light supper will be served beginning at 5 p.m., followed by the start of the program. For further information call 410-836-3647.
EXPLORE
July 12, 2011
On behalf of the Bel Air Lions Club and the volunteers who supported our effort, it was our pleasure to serve you breakfast. This year we served more than 2,100 customers, who ate regular or blueberry pancakes along with sausage and beverage of your choice. It took 29 Lions and nine spouses along with 41 Scout volunteers to accomplish this feat. Planning for this event started in late August and continued until the breakfast. Later this month we will start planning for next year again.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.