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By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | September 12, 2014
The days are getting shorter, and we're all struggling to settle back into our fall routines. Just when we needed it, there's Ananda, the thoroughly disarming, even magical, new Indian restaurant in the faraway kingdom of Maple Lawn in Howard County. You'll get up from your meal at Ananda, maybe a bit reluctantly - really, it's so cozy and comfortable here, you might want to linger - feeling refreshed, pleasantly full and extremely satisfied. I say pleasantly full because American diners can feel weighed down by Indian food.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | September 12, 2014
The days are getting shorter, and we're all struggling to settle back into our fall routines. Just when we needed it, there's Ananda, the thoroughly disarming, even magical, new Indian restaurant in the faraway kingdom of Maple Lawn in Howard County. You'll get up from your meal at Ananda, maybe a bit reluctantly - really, it's so cozy and comfortable here, you might want to linger - feeling refreshed, pleasantly full and extremely satisfied. I say pleasantly full because American diners can feel weighed down by Indian food.
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FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | September 12, 1994
"Think back to when we started this business," Joel Goodman, one of the lead characters in ABC-TV's "Blue Skies," tells his partner in the pilot episode. "We had just one brilliant idea: Rip off L. L. Bean."In that punch line lies the premise for this new sitcom, which will premiere at 8:30 tonight on WJZ (Channel 13): Two young guys, best friends, start a mail-order catalog business for outdoor gear and are almost making a go of it after only a year."Almost" is where things get interesting for Goodman (Corey Parker)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | March 16, 2013
Center Stage seems to have a thing for public accommodations these days. The company's last play was set in a nondescript motel room. The current one is set in a nondescript hotel room. The deja vu feeling is intensified since both productions have been presented in the intimate Head Theatre, with the stage in the exact same position, and by the fact that the first character to enter goes directly into the bathroom. The similarities are all coincidental, of course, but still intriguing, especially when it comes to the mix of humor and some pretty serious stuff that fills each piece.
FEATURES
By Young Chang and Young Chang,SUN STAFF | July 8, 1998
For the last month or so, fans of local radio station WHFS have been listening to something they've probably never heard before -- "Dundalk" in a song lyric.And they love it.The single "Blue Skies Over Dundalk," by an Annapolis cowpunk singer/songwriter who calls herself Mary Prankster, hit the airwaves in early June, and the reaction was "tremendous," says WHFS morning-show host Lou Brutus.Prankster's label, Fowl Records, rushed out 1,000 copies of the CD, also titled "Blue Skies Over Dundalk," and almost immediately they sold out. The album is now in its second printing, and the relatively unknown Prankster is "overjoyed."
NEWS
By Mary U. Corddry | March 14, 1994
NOTHING BUT BLUE SKIES. By Thomas McGuane. Vintage Contemporaries. 349 pages. $12.MONTANA is a place of rugged, wide-open spaces and skies and landscapes you don't even try to describe. It is a place where an outfitter leading a group of trailriders into the mountains encounters another group two days out and complains that "it's getting too crowded out here."Less known than Montana's lonely spaces is the scattered community of writers and poets who have been born or drawn there, and who are doing some of the best writing in America.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | May 10, 1994
There will be more stand-up comics, new ethnic sitcoms and a family movie night come next fall on ABC, as the second-place network focuses itself on the 18-to-49-year-old audience.The changes ABC made yesterday in announcing its fall schedule were not huge. Only four new hours of programming were added. The only noteworthy cancellation was that of "Phenom," a Tuesday-night sitcom about a teen tennis star, which regularly finished in Nielsen's top 25.But ABC's direction is clear. The network wants more of what Brett Butler and Ellen DeGeneres brought this year with their sitcoms.
NEWS
By William Robertson and William Robertson,Knight-Ridder News Service | September 27, 1992
NOTHING BUT BLUE SKIES.Thomas McGuane.Houghton Mifflin.349 pages. $21.95. For a long time now, critics and other journalists writing about Thomas McGuane have been eager to compare him to Ernest Hemingway, so let's clear up that business right now.Magazine and newspaper features dwell on the biographical similarities. Like Hemingway, Mr. McGuane has lived through some wacky times in Key West and out West, in Montana. He once was a heavy drinker, and he has a passion for hunting and fishing.
NEWS
By Scott Dance | August 8, 2012
Reader Megan Frohlich has shared an image of the confirmed waterspout that formed on the Patuxent River in Southern Maryland on Tuesday. The image backs up what radar showed yesterday afternoon -- that blue skies surrounded the small, isolated storm that produced the twister. According to a report posted by the National Weather Service in Sterling, Va., fire or rescue officials spotted the waterspout (which is the same as a tornado but over water) at 5:55 p.m. It was moving west across the Patuxent toward Maryland Route 231's Benedict Bridge.
FEATURES
By Fred Rasmussen | January 12, 1997
150 years ago in The SunJan. 13: SLEIGHING -- We observe that the enterprising proprietors of the different lines of omnibuses, have transferred many of their coaches from wheels to runners, and are crowded with passengers. Those who have no means, time or inclination to take a more expensive sleigh ride, will find a trip through the city in one of these comfortable coaches very satisfactory and agreeable.Jan. 18: PRESIDENT'S HOUSE -- The Washington Union states that the President's Mansion will be open for the reception of visitors on Wednesday evening, the 20th inst.
NEWS
By Scott Dance | August 8, 2012
Reader Megan Frohlich has shared an image of the confirmed waterspout that formed on the Patuxent River in Southern Maryland on Tuesday. The image backs up what radar showed yesterday afternoon -- that blue skies surrounded the small, isolated storm that produced the twister. According to a report posted by the National Weather Service in Sterling, Va., fire or rescue officials spotted the waterspout (which is the same as a tornado but over water) at 5:55 p.m. It was moving west across the Patuxent toward Maryland Route 231's Benedict Bridge.
BUSINESS
By Hanah Cho, The Baltimore Sun | July 11, 2011
Baltimore-based email marketing firm Blue Sky Factory has been acquired by a competitor in Atlanta. WhatCounts announced Monday that the acquisition of Blue Sky will add more talent, technology and client experiences. Financial terms were not disclosed. With Blue Sky's 27 workers, WhatCounts will have a combined 100-person workforce, said Greg Cangialosi, Blue Sky's chief executive officer. Blue Sky's Federal Hill headquarters will become the mid-Atlantic office of WhatCounts in the next few months, Cangialosi said.
SPORTS
By Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | May 21, 2011
As the Preakness Nation gathered for the 136th time on Saturday, it could count its blessings any number of ways — a sky so brightly blue the ladies really did need their bountifully brimmed hats, an infield scene that seemed as beer-soaked as ever yet also tamer, and, most of all, a horse race that was in doubt until the last step. Maryland's own Animal Kingdom finished second, a half-length behind Shackleford, disappointing home fans and ending any chance of a Triple Crown, last accomplished in 1978.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | March 14, 2008
With Horton Hears a Who!, the inventive gang at Blue Sky Studios have concocted an ebullient full-length feature from Dr. Seuss' slender comic verse narrative about an elephant whose big ears detect a whole world on a dust-speck. Unlike live-action filmmakers Ron Howard with How the Grinch Stole Christmas and Bo Welch with The Cat in the Hat, the Blue Sky team (including directors Jimmy Hayward and Steve Martino and writers Ken Daurio and Cinco Paul) stays true to the spirit and characters of the book while embellishing it to overflowing.
TRAVEL
September 9, 2007
The stage was set on an August day at the Atlantic City, N.J., beach - blue sky, golden sand, white sea gulls, yellow tents and, of course, the exciting crowd looking above. The 2007 Thunder Over the Boardwalk air show got under way as people cheered thrilling demonstrations by the U.S. Air Force Thunderbirds, U.S. fighter jets and many others. What an acrobat show in the sky. Siyuan Le, Newtown Square, Pa. The Sun welcomes submissions for "My Best Shot." Photos should be accompanied by a description of when and where you took the picture and your name, address and phone number.
ENTERTAINMENT
By SAM SESSA | July 5, 2007
Hometown -- Smithsburg Current members --Justin Kalk, vocals and guitar; Steve Britton, bass and vocals; Lincoln Nesto, drums Founded in --2004 Style --pop rock Influenced by --Jimi Hendrix, the Beatles, Bob Dylan, Miles Davis, Charles Mingus Notable --Blue Sky Traffic definitely gets around. The band recorded its first full-length album, A Beautiful Girl, in Nashville and Maryland. It also plays live with local hip-hop group the Pham. Quotable --"It's kind of an album that's like the best of all of our older stuff for the last three years," Kalk said.
NEWS
By Francis X. Clines and Francis X. Clines,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 24, 2001
CANNELTON, W.Va. - From his front-porch perch atop Mount Olive at the Blue Skies Home for the Elderly, Paul Wilshire recalled laboring down in the coal mines the old way, the antique way, with a low-tech mule named Susie. "If I didn't work, Susie didn't work that day," said Wilshire, who, at the age of 87, thought he had heard every crazy twist there was on the subject of mining. But then word came up from the valley about the coal company managers' latest idea: They want to import miners all the way from Ukraine to work down in the mines of Appalachia.
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | October 19, 1997
That Brian Transeau works at home is not particularly unusual. A number of his neighbors in rural Montgomery County do the same, farming or telecommuting.It's the kind of work Transeau does that seems out of the ordinary. He makes music -- electronic dance music, to be exact. Recording under the name BT, the 26-year-old singer and multi-instrumentalist is a rapidly rising part of the genre's vanguard, ranking with such cutting-edge acts as Moby, the Chemical Brothers, Crystal Method and Prodigy.
FEATURES
By Stephen Kiehl and Stephen Kiehl,Sun reporter | June 20, 2007
Put away your pity. Jeff Tweedy doesn't want it. The lead singer of Wilco is certainly no stranger to suffering. An addiction to painkillers sent him into rehab three years ago. He was paralyzed by anxiety and panic disorder. His record label rejected an album that was close to his heart. His mother died last year. None of it makes him special. "The fact is that everybody suffers," Tweedy says. "Whether you're an artist or not, you're not going to get through this life unscathed. You're going to be touched by tragedy and a lot of things.
NEWS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,SUN STAFF | March 14, 2005
Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr., On the morning of the 49th annual St. Patrick's Day Parade, clouds blocked the sun. A chill permeated the air. It was, in a word, bleak. But just before the clock struck 2 p.m., when the sousaphones finished lining up along Centre Street, mercurial March came through with blue skies and sunshine. Though temperatures still hovered in the low 40s, the sun stuck around for most of the parade. It was a stroke of luck to those bundled up in green on the sidelines.
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