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BUSINESS
By Ross Hetrick | January 18, 1992
Spurred by increasingly vocal complaints about how health insurers decide what procedures to pay for, Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Maryland defended its system yesterday and said a proposal to set up a regulatory panel would be unworkable.There has been a growing number of complaints by patients, particularly in the area of drug and alcohol treatment, about health insurers denying payments for various types of treatment. In some cases, the denials came after the treatment was finished, leaving the patient with the bill.
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HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn and Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | November 20, 2013
CareFirst BlueCross BlueShield said Wednesday that it would offer more than 55,500 customers the chance to extend their healthcare plans for another year, even though the policies don't comply with the federal Affordable Care Act. Maryland's insurance commissioner had told insurers a day earlier that such a move would be legal, and last week a beleaguered President Barack Obama asked states and insurers to consider the extensions. The president had promised Americans that if they liked their plans, they could keep them.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | October 23, 2001
Denwood Norris Kelly, a former president of Blue Shield of Maryland and noted philatelist and paper money expert, died of pneumonia Friday at Keswick Multi-Care Center. He was 88 and lived in the Mays Chapel section of Baltimore County. Mr. Kelly, a Baltimore native, began his career in 1933 in general real estate and insurance, specializing in property management and appraising. In 1953, he went to work in the health insurance field, joining Tidewater Hospital Service Association, the Blue Cross Plan in Norfolk, Va. He was executive director of the plan when he returned to Baltimore in 1957 as assistant director of Maryland Blue Cross and Blue Shield.
NEWS
September 21, 2010
The article in the business section "Primary care gets a boost in pay" (Sept. 21) is an interesting concept. It would be even more interesting to see how behavioral health care is integrated into this system, in a meaningful way, since most patients who are high users of the medical system and high cost usually have a co-occurring mental illness, substance abuse and/or a cognitive/intellectual disorder as well. Revising an integrated plan of care and monitoring the patient's progress is one thing, but in order to know how effective the treatment is also depends on a quality component such as the use of specific outcome measures that are realistic and measurable.
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | November 15, 1997
Buoyed by investment income, Blue Cross Blue Shield of Maryland reported yesterday $9.5 million in profit in the third quarter, up 21.4 percent from $7.8 million in the third quarter last year.Revenue for the quarter was $550 million, up 10.7 percent from $497 million in 1996. But the $53 million increase in revenue was offset by a $54 million increase in the cost of medical care."Our care costs continue to outpace our growth in revenue," said Mark Chaney, senior vice president and chief financial officer.
BUSINESS
By David Conn and David Conn,Annapolis Bureau of The Sun | August 28, 1991
ANNAPOLIS -- Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Maryland yesterday became the first company to take advantage of a new law aimed at alleviating the plight of the state's roughly 570,000 residents who have no health insurance.Blue Cross Chairman Carl Sardegna told members of the House Economic Matters Committee that his company has filed a request with the state Insurance Division for permission to sell its version of a lower-cost, stripped-down health insurance policy that doesn't include all of the more than two dozen benefits state law requires most policies to offer.
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | August 10, 2003
Health insurance is a highly regulated industry, but state officials who oversee the industry have bumped up against a powerful entity they can't regulate - the national Blue Cross and Blue Shield Association. In Maryland and North Carolina, regulators and legislators have been stymied at times in trying to deal with the local Blue Cross Blue Shield entity when the national association has threatened to pull its trademark and threaten the viability of the local insurer. "If there's a novel issue rising out of what happened in Maryland, it's the role of the association and the power that they have," said Steven B. Larsen, the former Maryland insurance commissioner whose scathing report halted CareFirst, the Blue Cross plan in Maryland, from converting to a for-profit company from nonprofit.
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | August 15, 1997
With revenue rising faster than costs, Blue Cross Blue Shield of Maryland reported yesterday a 42 percent increase in second quarter earnings.The Owings Mills insurer said it earned $8.3 million in the quarter, compared with $5.8 million in the same period last year.Revenue for the quarter increased 7.1 percent, to $522.3 million from $487.7 million a year ago."We're very pleased," said Mark Chaney, senior vice president and chief financial officer. "Even in a very competitive marketplace, we continue to be profitable."
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly | March 11, 2010
Dr. Joseph Emmett Queen, a retired internist who was former medical director of Blue Cross and Blue Shield, died of pneumonia Sunday at Greater Baltimore Medical Center. The Mercy Ridge resident was 93. Born in Baltimore, he recalled his childhood in an autobiographical sketch. He grew up with silent movies at the Forest Theater near his Forest Park home. He carried Prohibition home-brew beer for his parents, bought a used 1927 Chevrolet for $25 in 1934 and sold it three years later to a scrap dealer for $4. He drove the car, which had a rumble seat, to the Chicago World's Fair.
BUSINESS
By Ann LoLordo and Suzanne Wooton and Ann LoLordo and Suzanne Wooton,Staff Writers | July 29, 1992
Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Maryland and the state insurance commissioner unveiled an agreement yesterday that will give regulators access to financial information they had previously sought unsuccessfully.The agreement, announced at a special legislative hearing in Annapolis on the financial health of the Blues, provides Insurance Commissioner John A. Donaho with information that he says he needs to adequately regulate Maryland's largest health insurer.The pact was signed Monday, three weeks after Mr. Donaho described the company in startling testimony before a U.S. Senate subcommittee as "barely solvent" and accused Blue Cross of poor management and setting up money-losing subsidiaries outside his purview.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | May 25, 2010
William F. Bruther, whose career as an Annapolis ophthalmologist spanned nearly 40 years and included having served as chief of ophthalmology at Anne Arundel Medical Center, died Thursday of liver failure at the medical center. He was 70. Dr. Bruther was born in Trenton, N.J., and raised in Annapolis, where his father was chief of personnel at the Naval Academy and his mother was a registered nurse. After graduating from St. Mary's High School in Annapolis in 1957, he entered Mount St. Mary's University in Emmitsburg, where he earned a bachelor's degree in 1961 in biology.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly | March 11, 2010
Dr. Joseph Emmett Queen, a retired internist who was former medical director of Blue Cross and Blue Shield, died of pneumonia Sunday at Greater Baltimore Medical Center. The Mercy Ridge resident was 93. Born in Baltimore, he recalled his childhood in an autobiographical sketch. He grew up with silent movies at the Forest Theater near his Forest Park home. He carried Prohibition home-brew beer for his parents, bought a used 1927 Chevrolet for $25 in 1934 and sold it three years later to a scrap dealer for $4. He drove the car, which had a rumble seat, to the Chicago World's Fair.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | October 10, 2009
James Daniel Nolan, a retired lawyer and former president of Blue Shield of Maryland who landed at Normandy with the 1st Infantry Division on D-Day, died Wednesday of cancer at Mercy Ridge in Timonium. He was 86. Mr. Nolan, the son of Irish immigrant parents, was born in Baltimore and raised on McKean Avenue and later in Howard Park. "His father was a streetcar motorman for United Railways and Electric Company, and his mother was a housekeeper," said a son, Stephen J. Nolan, a Towson lawyer and a Timonium resident.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,Sun Reporter | August 23, 2008
Francis C. Ehart, a retired stationery company executive and former longtime Linthicum Heights resident, died Tuesday of a cerebral hemorrhage at the Hospice of the Chesapeake in Harwood. He was 93. Mr. Ehart was born in Baltimore and raised on Marshall Street. He attended city public schools until the eighth grade and later earned his General Educational Development diploma while attending night school. In 1931, Mr. Ehart began working as an office boy for D.N. Owens & Co. Inc., a Baltimore business forms company located on Calvert Street.
NEWS
March 23, 2007
John M.T. Finney III, a retired Blue Cross and Blue Shield executive who had been active in Boy Scouts, died Sunday of pneumonia at the College Manor nursing home in Lutherville. The former longtime Roland Park resident was 85. Mr. Finney was born in Baltimore and raised on Circle Road in Ruxton. He was the son of Dr. John M.T. Finney Jr., a noted Baltimore surgeon who was a founder of Union Memorial Hospital. He was a 1942 graduate of McDonogh School and attended Princeton University.
NEWS
October 3, 2005
Marie C. Wirth, who helped create a program that expanded medical insurance for seniors, died of aspiration pneumonia Sept. 26 at the Pickersgill Retirement Community in Towson. She was 88 and a longtime Loch Raven resident. Born Marie Catherine Parks in Towson, she graduated from Towson Catholic High School in 1934, said her son, Gary Wirth of Towson. In 1937 she married Carl A. Wirth of Loch Raven, who was a member of the Maryland National Guard and was stationed in Texas during World War II. Mrs. Wirth traveled frequently by train between Baltimore and Texas during those years.
NEWS
By Michael James and Michael James,SUN STAFF | April 30, 1996
In Maryland, Haroon R. Ansari once told whopping lies on a resume that state officials never bothered to check and was named to a $62,000-a-year job as head of Crownsville Hospital Center.The would-be psychologist was declared a fraud, resigned in disgrace and pleaded guilty to a misdemeanor last April, promising never to lie on a job application again.A week later, he sent his resume to officials with Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Michigan. Authorities said he told more whopping lies and got hired for over $80,000 a year, with his employer once again failing to conduct a background investigation.
NEWS
December 16, 1990
Offices of Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Maryland, including the Medicare and subscriber customer service lobbies, will be closed all day Dec. 24, Christmas Eve; Dec. 25, Christmas Day; and Jan. 1, New Year's Day.Blue Cross and Blue Shield will be open all day Monday, New Year's Eve.Offices of the Columbia FreeState Health System, Blue Cross Blue Shield's HMO network, and Green Spring Mental Health Services, Blue Cross and Blue Shield's managed subsidiary for...
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | July 16, 2004
In another defeat for a Blue Cross plan seeking to switch to for-profit operation, the insurance commissioner in the state of Washington yesterday rejected a for-profit conversion proposed by Premera Blue Cross. Maryland's CareFirst BlueCross BlueShield had its controversial plan to become a for-profit blocked 16 months ago. Since then, the Kansas Supreme Court upheld that state's earlier rejection of a conversion, Blue Cross and Blue Shield of North Carolina withdrew its conversion application, and Horizon Blue Cross and Blue Shield of New Jersey announced it was dropping its exploration of conversion.
NEWS
May 14, 2004
Hume Opie Annan Jr., a retired vice president of Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Maryland, died of cancer May 7 at Sacred Heart Hospital in Cumberland. He was 77 and a resident of Fort Ashby, W.Va., and formerly lived in Loch Raven Village. He was born in Tampa, Fla., and raised in Cumberland, and he worked his studies at Princeton University around merchant marine service in World War II. He graduated from the school in 1949 and was elected to the Phi Beta Kappa honors fraternity. After serving in the Army from 1950 to 1952, he moved to Baltimore and became vice president of corporate planning and research for Blue Cross and Blue Shield.
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