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By J. Wynn Rousuck | January 6, 2000
Winning the rights to produce the area premiere of David Hare's Broadway and West End hit, "The Blue Room," is a bit of a coup for the Spotlighters, where the show opens tomorrow. An updated adaptation of "La Ronde," Arthur Schnitzler's turn-of-the-century exploration of sexual liaisons, the play was originally performed by only two actors -- Nicole Kidman and Iain Glen (with Kidman's in-the-buff performance dubbed "pure theatrical Viagra" by one British critic). Director Bob Russell has cast 10 actors in the Spotlighters production, which will also include nudity and is intended for mature audiences.
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By Matea Gold and Matea Gold,LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 24, 2005
NEW YORK - By now, the story's become part of the Katie Couric legend. In October 1992, Couric, still a relatively new face on NBC's venerable morning news program Today, was finishing a live tour of the White House with then-first lady Barbara Bush when a surprise guest wandered into the Blue Room - President George H.W. Bush himself. Bush apparently had planned just to say a quick hello on national television, but a poised Couric kept him there for 19 minutes. She quizzed him about the burgeoning Iran-contra scandal and his recent debate performance against Bill Clinton and Ross Perot, confirming her journalistic credentials in the process.
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FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | January 17, 2000
Every now and then a show comes along that has more drama surrounding it than there is on stage. David Hare's "The Blue Room," receiving its Baltimore premiere at the Spotlighters Theatre, is a prime example. I wouldn't go so far as to call it a case of the emperor's new clothes, tempting as that might be since the show has a generous display of nudity. The nudity, however, is the cause of all the attention. In London and New York, where Nicole Kidman appeared in the buff, "The Blue Room" not only made headlines and magazine covers, it became one of the hottest tickets on two continents.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | January 17, 2000
Every now and then a show comes along that has more drama surrounding it than there is on stage. David Hare's "The Blue Room," receiving its Baltimore premiere at the Spotlighters Theatre, is a prime example. I wouldn't go so far as to call it a case of the emperor's new clothes, tempting as that might be since the show has a generous display of nudity. The nudity, however, is the cause of all the attention. In London and New York, where Nicole Kidman appeared in the buff, "The Blue Room" not only made headlines and magazine covers, it became one of the hottest tickets on two continents.
FEATURES
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,SUN STAFF | January 7, 2000
Bob Russell's been directing theater off and on for 37 years, but this production is different. All of a sudden he's giving the actors the right to change scenes if they're uncomfortable, he's got to think in a different way about whether the audience is comfortable, about rules governing auditions and how much touching is too much. You put naked people on a stage, things change. Not that Russell had to be pushed into directing "The Blue Room," which opens tonight for a four-week run at the Spotlighters Theatre.
NEWS
By Jill Hudson Neal and Jill Hudson Neal,SUN STAFF | November 18, 1999
It's a strange thing to see a big bottle of peppermint mouthwash and a tower of tiny plastic cups so prominently displayed in a theater lobby, but there it was.The open bottle of Listerine was conveniently located on a table, and the assembled actors who lounged around on worn sofas in Baltimore's Spotlighter's Theater waiting their turn to rehearse were encouraged to pour themselves a nice big shot and gargle.Fresh breath, you see, is a must for the 10 actors who've been cast in the Baltimore premiere of "The Blue Room," the celebrated play about a series of related sexual liaisons that played to sellout audiences this year on Broadway.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck | January 14, 1999
British playwright David Hare is one of the hottest writers on Broadway this season. Last month's opening of "The Blue Room" made national news (with a power assist from a brief nude scene by Nicole Kidman). In early March, the playwright will star in his autobiographical one-man show, "Via Dolorosa," and after that comes "Amy's View," starring Judi Dench.Actually, Hare's plays have become somewhat of an annual fixture on Broadway. His 1996 Broadway entry, "Skylight," makes its local debut tomorrow at Fell's Point Corner Theatre.
FEATURES
By Mike Giuliano and Mike Giuliano,Special to The Evening Sun | May 16, 1991
Barbara Young's photography exhibit at the Katzenstein Gallery is an interesting case study. Although this Baltimore psychiatrist by profession examines people very closely, her color photographs usually feature nature studies or domestic architecture, but not human subjects.Perhaps this is because Young originally took up photography as a hobby that would take her mind off her mind-probing work. Like any tourist, she would snap vacation photos in the Bahamas. Unlike most tourists, however, her hobby became something more than that.
FEATURES
By Matea Gold and Matea Gold,LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 24, 2005
NEW YORK - By now, the story's become part of the Katie Couric legend. In October 1992, Couric, still a relatively new face on NBC's venerable morning news program Today, was finishing a live tour of the White House with then-first lady Barbara Bush when a surprise guest wandered into the Blue Room - President George H.W. Bush himself. Bush apparently had planned just to say a quick hello on national television, but a poised Couric kept him there for 19 minutes. She quizzed him about the burgeoning Iran-contra scandal and his recent debate performance against Bill Clinton and Ross Perot, confirming her journalistic credentials in the process.
FEATURES
By Karin Remesch | September 8, 1999
Spotlighters Theatre. David Hare's "The Blue Room." Meeting for technical personnel -- production coordinator, assistant stage manager, light and sound designers, light and sound operators, props master, costumer, set design, set construction, set decorators, and dramaturg -- 7 p.m. Sunday at the theater, 817 St. Paul St.Auditions for acting roles at 7 p.m. Sept. 19-20 at the theater. Needed are up to 10 male and female actors, ages 20-45; some roles may be double cast. Some scenes include nudity.
FEATURES
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,SUN STAFF | January 7, 2000
Bob Russell's been directing theater off and on for 37 years, but this production is different. All of a sudden he's giving the actors the right to change scenes if they're uncomfortable, he's got to think in a different way about whether the audience is comfortable, about rules governing auditions and how much touching is too much. You put naked people on a stage, things change. Not that Russell had to be pushed into directing "The Blue Room," which opens tonight for a four-week run at the Spotlighters Theatre.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck | January 6, 2000
Winning the rights to produce the area premiere of David Hare's Broadway and West End hit, "The Blue Room," is a bit of a coup for the Spotlighters, where the show opens tomorrow. An updated adaptation of "La Ronde," Arthur Schnitzler's turn-of-the-century exploration of sexual liaisons, the play was originally performed by only two actors -- Nicole Kidman and Iain Glen (with Kidman's in-the-buff performance dubbed "pure theatrical Viagra" by one British critic). Director Bob Russell has cast 10 actors in the Spotlighters production, which will also include nudity and is intended for mature audiences.
NEWS
By Jill Hudson Neal and Jill Hudson Neal,SUN STAFF | November 18, 1999
It's a strange thing to see a big bottle of peppermint mouthwash and a tower of tiny plastic cups so prominently displayed in a theater lobby, but there it was.The open bottle of Listerine was conveniently located on a table, and the assembled actors who lounged around on worn sofas in Baltimore's Spotlighter's Theater waiting their turn to rehearse were encouraged to pour themselves a nice big shot and gargle.Fresh breath, you see, is a must for the 10 actors who've been cast in the Baltimore premiere of "The Blue Room," the celebrated play about a series of related sexual liaisons that played to sellout audiences this year on Broadway.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck | January 14, 1999
British playwright David Hare is one of the hottest writers on Broadway this season. Last month's opening of "The Blue Room" made national news (with a power assist from a brief nude scene by Nicole Kidman). In early March, the playwright will star in his autobiographical one-man show, "Via Dolorosa," and after that comes "Amy's View," starring Judi Dench.Actually, Hare's plays have become somewhat of an annual fixture on Broadway. His 1996 Broadway entry, "Skylight," makes its local debut tomorrow at Fell's Point Corner Theatre.
FEATURES
By Mike Giuliano and Mike Giuliano,Special to The Evening Sun | May 16, 1991
Barbara Young's photography exhibit at the Katzenstein Gallery is an interesting case study. Although this Baltimore psychiatrist by profession examines people very closely, her color photographs usually feature nature studies or domestic architecture, but not human subjects.Perhaps this is because Young originally took up photography as a hobby that would take her mind off her mind-probing work. Like any tourist, she would snap vacation photos in the Bahamas. Unlike most tourists, however, her hobby became something more than that.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sarah Kickler Kelber | January 8, 2004
Spotlighters presents a musical for adults Hello Again - a musical adaptation of Arthur Schnitzler's La Ronde, upon which The Blue Room was also based - is next up for the Audrey Herman Spotlighters Theatre. The show examines the nature of sexual attraction and the search for love and happiness while focusing on the experiences of 10 couples across 10 decades. Bob Russell and Karen Starliper direct. Due to the adult nature of the material, audience members must be 18 or older. "Hello Again" runs tomorrow through Feb. 7. Show times are 8 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays and 2 p.m. Sundays.
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