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By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,Sun Arts Writer | December 17, 2003
Eight days before it is scheduled to open in movie theaters, the Civil War epic Cold Mountain already is generating Oscar hype. Set in North Carolina and Virginia, the movie tells the story of Inman, a wounded Confederate soldier who takes a long journey on foot through the Blue Ridge mountains to return to the woman he loves. He dodges Yankee soldiers and his own troops, who are shooting deserters. The film, which is based on the National Book Award-winning novel by Charles Frazier, stars Jude Law, Nicole Kidman and Renee Zellweger.
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BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | August 8, 2014
The redevelopment of a former Army post in the Blue Ridge Mountains might not appear to have much in common with the renovation of the historic Hippodrome Theatre on Baltimore's west side. Spanning roughly 600 acres in Western Maryland's Washington County, Fort Ritchie envelops two small lakes and is speckled with spruce trees and gray stone buildings dating to the 1920s. It's hardly a theater in a gritty part of downtown. But like the Hippodrome , the installation presents a daunting set of questions - multiple stakeholders with competing interests, historic considerations, a difficult location.
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BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | August 8, 2014
The redevelopment of a former Army post in the Blue Ridge Mountains might not appear to have much in common with the renovation of the historic Hippodrome Theatre on Baltimore's west side. Spanning roughly 600 acres in Western Maryland's Washington County, Fort Ritchie envelops two small lakes and is speckled with spruce trees and gray stone buildings dating to the 1920s. It's hardly a theater in a gritty part of downtown. But like the Hippodrome , the installation presents a daunting set of questions - multiple stakeholders with competing interests, historic considerations, a difficult location.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | May 22, 2013
Forecasters no longer expect to issue a severe thunderstorm watch, but strong storms are possible late Wednesday for an area along and west of Interstate 95, according to the Storm Prediction Center. Damaging winds and large hail are possible in an area stretching from Virginia's Blue Ridge Mountains to Central Pennsylvania, including Carroll County and parts of Howard and Baltimore counties. The center had expected about a 40 percent likelihood of a severe storm watch, which would mean conditions could be ripe for such storms, but has since removed that area of concern from its forecast maps.
FEATURES
By Candyce H. Stapen and Candyce H. Stapen,Contributing Writer | April 26, 1992
In spring, purple, white and yellow wildflowers dot the roadsides of Virginia's Shenandoah Valley and the Blue Ridge Mountains, and delicate sprays of pink and white cherry and apple blossoms lace the hills.This is the perfect time to explore the countryside by car, bike or foot. The winding roads of Skyline Drive and the Blue Ridge Parkway offer magical mountain vistas. New buds feather the trees through the Shenandoah National Park. Look quickly on your woodland walks and you might catch sight of a doe or see hawks cutting lazy circles in the sky.In the valley towns, enjoy an array of country culture as down home as the Shenandoah Apple Blossom Festival in Winchester, April 30 through May 3, complete with blue-grass concert and hometown parade or as polished as Staunton's presidential museum and historic farmsteads.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,Evening Sun Staff | May 14, 1991
RICHMOND, Va. -- Bobby Julich looks so young, a proverbial Beaver Cleaver, as he sits on his hotel room bed, watching reruns of "Who's the Boss" with his roommate Bob Mionske.They are both amateurs, riding for USA (Chex-Skittles) against the best pro cyclists in the world. But there is nothing amateurish about either their performances or their dreams.Yesterday, Mionske took part in a world-class sprint with Motorola veteran Phil Anderson of Australia to end Stage 4 in a photo finish. When tapes were reviewed, Anderson was first by a sliver.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | May 22, 2013
Forecasters no longer expect to issue a severe thunderstorm watch, but strong storms are possible late Wednesday for an area along and west of Interstate 95, according to the Storm Prediction Center. Damaging winds and large hail are possible in an area stretching from Virginia's Blue Ridge Mountains to Central Pennsylvania, including Carroll County and parts of Howard and Baltimore counties. The center had expected about a 40 percent likelihood of a severe storm watch, which would mean conditions could be ripe for such storms, but has since removed that area of concern from its forecast maps.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | April 8, 2013
Rebecca Rigger, a League of Women Voters activist who monitored the Baltimore County Planning Board, died of a heart attack March 25 at her Monkton home. She was 85. Born Rebecca Rogers in Big Island, Va., she was raised at an apple orchard in the Blue Ridge Mountains. She earned a bachelor's degree from what is now James Madison University, where she was editor of the college newspaper. As a young woman, she moved to eastern Baltimore County and taught at Middle River Junior High School.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Ronald Hube and Ronald Hube,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 17, 2005
Despite what the European explorers who named Sugarloaf Mountain thought, it doesn't really look much like a cone of crystallized sugar. And with an elevation of only 1,282 feet, it's not much of a mountain either. But standing alone in the farmland of Montgomery and Frederick counties, more than 20 miles from the Blue Ridge Mountains, Sugarloaf is well worth visiting for the great unobstructed views it offers, especially in winter when the trees are bare (blooming wildflowers make spring a good time so see the mountain, too)
NEWS
Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | February 5, 2012
Nearly two years after Cockeysville native Yeardley Love was found dead, bruised and lying in a pool of blood in an off-campus apartment near the University of Virginia, her former boyfriend and fellow lacrosse player is scheduled to stand trial for her murder. Jury selection in the case against George W. Huguely V, now 24, is set to begin Monday in Charlottesville Circuit Court, with opening statements likely Tuesday afternoon or Wednesday. The death of the promising young college student and arrest of her popular one-time boyfriend after a night of drinking in May 2010 shocked the nation - and has led to sweeping expansions in Virginia's protective order laws and the university's safety policies.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | April 8, 2013
Rebecca Rigger, a League of Women Voters activist who monitored the Baltimore County Planning Board, died of a heart attack March 25 at her Monkton home. She was 85. Born Rebecca Rogers in Big Island, Va., she was raised at an apple orchard in the Blue Ridge Mountains. She earned a bachelor's degree from what is now James Madison University, where she was editor of the college newspaper. As a young woman, she moved to eastern Baltimore County and taught at Middle River Junior High School.
NEWS
Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | February 5, 2012
Nearly two years after Cockeysville native Yeardley Love was found dead, bruised and lying in a pool of blood in an off-campus apartment near the University of Virginia, her former boyfriend and fellow lacrosse player is scheduled to stand trial for her murder. Jury selection in the case against George W. Huguely V, now 24, is set to begin Monday in Charlottesville Circuit Court, with opening statements likely Tuesday afternoon or Wednesday. The death of the promising young college student and arrest of her popular one-time boyfriend after a night of drinking in May 2010 shocked the nation - and has led to sweeping expansions in Virginia's protective order laws and the university's safety policies.
TRAVEL
By Donna M. Owens, Special to The Baltimore Sun | September 19, 2010
For his birthday last year, William Robertson chose to visit his favorite place: a lovely Italianate villa set in the lush Virginia countryside. And when the 7-year-old arrived at Keswick Hall, accompanied by his family, the staff at the luxury inn treated him like royalty. "There was a card in the room, and snacks," said his mother, Catherine Robertson. "Later, at dinner, the chef made him dessert with clef notes decorating the plate. And the pianist played, 'Happy Birthday.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Ronald Hube and Ronald Hube,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 17, 2005
Despite what the European explorers who named Sugarloaf Mountain thought, it doesn't really look much like a cone of crystallized sugar. And with an elevation of only 1,282 feet, it's not much of a mountain either. But standing alone in the farmland of Montgomery and Frederick counties, more than 20 miles from the Blue Ridge Mountains, Sugarloaf is well worth visiting for the great unobstructed views it offers, especially in winter when the trees are bare (blooming wildflowers make spring a good time so see the mountain, too)
FEATURES
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,Sun Arts Writer | December 17, 2003
Eight days before it is scheduled to open in movie theaters, the Civil War epic Cold Mountain already is generating Oscar hype. Set in North Carolina and Virginia, the movie tells the story of Inman, a wounded Confederate soldier who takes a long journey on foot through the Blue Ridge mountains to return to the woman he loves. He dodges Yankee soldiers and his own troops, who are shooting deserters. The film, which is based on the National Book Award-winning novel by Charles Frazier, stars Jude Law, Nicole Kidman and Renee Zellweger.
TRAVEL
By Sarah Clayton and By Sarah Clayton,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 19, 2000
It was a cold day for a hike into the heart of the Blue Ridge Mountains. The raw wind scraped our cheeks, and the snowy peaks above glistened like icebergs. But winter had kept us indoors too long, and we were determined to get out. Even better, day's end -- 11 uphill miles away -- promised a warm bath, a hot fire and a hearty meal at the Peaks of Otter Lodge. It was a stunning, but challenging, walk. After parking our car just outside Arcadia, Va., where the Appalachian Trail crosses Route 614, we headed up the steep, winding trail, quickly leaving the hemlock-lined valley below.
TRAVEL
By Donna M. Owens, Special to The Baltimore Sun | September 19, 2010
For his birthday last year, William Robertson chose to visit his favorite place: a lovely Italianate villa set in the lush Virginia countryside. And when the 7-year-old arrived at Keswick Hall, accompanied by his family, the staff at the luxury inn treated him like royalty. "There was a card in the room, and snacks," said his mother, Catherine Robertson. "Later, at dinner, the chef made him dessert with clef notes decorating the plate. And the pianist played, 'Happy Birthday.
NEWS
By Wade Rawlins and Wade Rawlins,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 10, 1997
WEST JEFFERSON, N.C. -- Thought about getting a Christmas tree yet?Ron Hudler has been thinking about Christmas trees for 11 months -- ever since last Christmas, in fact. Hudler has a half-million of them growing on 14 farms that dot this scenic sweep of the southern Appalachian mountains.Hudler walks slowly across a gravel lot past a red farm wagon on which a half-dozen laborers are sprawled, napping. They sit up on elbows as he approaches."Don't get up on my account," Hudler says. "We were here until midnight last night loading trees."
TRAVEL
By Gerri Kobren and Gerri Kobren,Special to the Sun | July 25, 1999
Just east of Charlottesville, Va., in the foothills of the Blue Ridge Mountains, Keswick Hall at Monticello stands as a testament to the power of fantasy.From the outside, it's a villa in Tuscany. Indoors, it is something else again -- a 48-room luxury hotel decked out in Laura Ashley fabrics and an eclectic collection of antiques, offering a lifestyle experience most often associated with the rich and famous.For $330 -- the price for a room with unlimited one-day golfing for one -- we get breakfast free, so Keswick could be defined as a B&B. But this is no just-folks kind of place.
FEATURES
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | July 11, 1998
When his Western Maryland Railway was saddled with debt, Gen. John Mifflin Hood knew just how to generate traffic. He created a destination -- a Washington County mountain resort that offered an escape from the area's notoriously humid summers.Nestled on the summit of the Blue Ridge Mountains -- some 1,400 feet above sea level along the Maryland-Pennsylvania border -- Pen Mar offered visitors cooling breezes and sweeping views of the Cumberland Valley and miles of Pennsylvania farmland.From 1878 until it closed in 1942, a casualty of wartime gas rationing and changing tastes, Pen Mar and its amusement park attracted nearly a million tourists each summer.
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