Advertisement
HomeCollectionsBlue Ridge
IN THE NEWS

Blue Ridge

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
By Donna Rifkind and By Donna Rifkind,Special to the Sun | September 24, 2000
"Blue Ridge," by T.R. Pearson. Viking. 243 pages. $24.95. Southern discomfort is the specialty of T. R. Pearson, who in six previous novels has chronicled a wide variety of sad and gruesome events in a series of small towns in North Carolina and Virginia. Yet so leisurely and discursive is Pearson's comic style that the reader feels no pain, anesthetized by the wry, affable drawl of his literary voice. Despite its title, "Blue Ridge" expands beyond this author's usual territory. His new novel veers between two narratives, one set in tiny Hogarth, Va., and the other mostly in the fleshpots of New York City.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | August 4, 2013
As Fable, a 5-year-old Newfoundland, lies on a table at the Baltimore Humane Society in Reisterstown, she doesn't seem to notice the needle in her jugular vein. Instead, the pooch blissfully licks peanut butter from the hand of her owner, Lauren Schneider, while a handler cradles her with his whole body. Fable and her sister, Kenzie, are canine blood donors - and veterinarians and animal advocates say the world needs more of them. The dogs' blood was going to a major university and an emergency animal hospital in other states, where it's in high demand.
Advertisement
FEATURES
By Jay Clarke and Jay Clarke,Knight-Ridder News Service | June 5, 1994
America's most popular national park is in trouble.Evergreen trees that crown the mountains through which the Blue Ridge Parkway passes are dying, leaving behind an eerie forest of whitened, leafless trunks.At lower elevations, oaks, maples and other deciduous trees are under attack from a moth introduced from Europe.A lethal sickness also has struck the dogwood that brightens the forests every spring with cheery bursts of bloom, and some scientists say that in 10 to 15 years, not a single dogwood will remain.
EXPLORE
By Lane Page | June 13, 2011
There's a herd of green zebras in the Blue Ridge Mountains. Uh, better make that a fleet. They can be found roaming in the vicinity of Snowshoe Mountain Resort in Snowshoe, W. Va., where the open military-style all-terrain Tomcars of that moniker scramble off-road over a dozen-mile course of rocks, roots, hills, switchbacks, creek beds and mud pits. These Green Zebras do travel in a fleet, with as many as six on a given guided tour, but don't jump to the conclusion that it's a choreographed experience.
TRAVEL
By Sarah Clayton and By Sarah Clayton,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 19, 2000
It was a cold day for a hike into the heart of the Blue Ridge Mountains. The raw wind scraped our cheeks, and the snowy peaks above glistened like icebergs. But winter had kept us indoors too long, and we were determined to get out. Even better, day's end -- 11 uphill miles away -- promised a warm bath, a hot fire and a hearty meal at the Peaks of Otter Lodge. It was a stunning, but challenging, walk. After parking our car just outside Arcadia, Va., where the Appalachian Trail crosses Route 614, we headed up the steep, winding trail, quickly leaving the hemlock-lined valley below.
FEATURES
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | July 11, 1998
When his Western Maryland Railway was saddled with debt, Gen. John Mifflin Hood knew just how to generate traffic. He created a destination -- a Washington County mountain resort that offered an escape from the area's notoriously humid summers.Nestled on the summit of the Blue Ridge Mountains -- some 1,400 feet above sea level along the Maryland-Pennsylvania border -- Pen Mar offered visitors cooling breezes and sweeping views of the Cumberland Valley and miles of Pennsylvania farmland.From 1878 until it closed in 1942, a casualty of wartime gas rationing and changing tastes, Pen Mar and its amusement park attracted nearly a million tourists each summer.
FEATURES
By LISA WISEMAN | December 27, 1992
People always return to Blue Ridge Summit. They come at first because they need to leave the civilized world for a day or two. They return because they find something special here.The town sits 2,000 feet above sea level and straddles the Maryland/Pennsylvania line at Frederick and Washington counties. Once you're in town, follow the winding Buena Vista Road to the top of the mountain and you'll find only a few homes, a small chapel, a winding stone wall, an open field and some of the most breathtaking scenery you've spied in some time.
NEWS
April 2, 2007
On April 1, 2007, LARKIN H. BIRMINGHAM age 92, of Blue Ridge, VA, formerly of Glen Burnie, MD. Services will be held at the chapel of Singleton Funeral Home, 1 Second Ave SW, Glen Burnie on Tuesday April 3 at 1 P.M. Visitation will be 1 hour prior to the service. Interment Holy Cross Cemetery.
NEWS
November 9, 2006
On Tuesday, November 7, 2006, PEGGY MONTGOMERY, 59, of Troutville, VA, formerly of Baltimore, MD. She was employed by Wachovia Bank. She was one of the found members of St. Thomas of Canterbury Anglican Church in Roanoke, VA, where she was also a Sunday School Teacher and Altar Guild Member. She was a professed Third Order Sister of the Third Order of the Franciscans of the Divine Compassion known as Sister Mary Margaret, TDC. She was preceded in death by her husband Michael Montgomery, grandparents, Blanche and Carl Doyle and her uncle Merle Doyle.
SPORTS
By John Steadman | December 19, 1990
Battered by a dreadful score of 110-0 is not an experience soon to be forgotten. And it hasn't been. Not for 63 years, at least among the survivors, including one Ralph Johnson, who has vivid recall of when Blue Ridge College, located in New Windsor, Md., was all but annihilated by Temple University on Oct. 1, 1927, in Philadelphia.Poor Blue Ridge, trampled 110-0. So many Blue Ridge players were carried off the field that the Temple coach, Henry "Heinie" Miller, lent them some members of his squad in a sporting gesture.
TRAVEL
By Donna M. Owens, Special to The Baltimore Sun | September 19, 2010
For his birthday last year, William Robertson chose to visit his favorite place: a lovely Italianate villa set in the lush Virginia countryside. And when the 7-year-old arrived at Keswick Hall, accompanied by his family, the staff at the luxury inn treated him like royalty. "There was a card in the room, and snacks," said his mother, Catherine Robertson. "Later, at dinner, the chef made him dessert with clef notes decorating the plate. And the pianist played, 'Happy Birthday.
BUSINESS
By Hanah Cho, The Baltimore Sun | July 6, 2010
Although many locally owned banks in Maryland are continuing to reel from the fallout of the mortgage crisis, BlueRidge Bank sees an opening to expand in the Baltimore region. The Frederick-based bank — the only banking institution to open in the state in more than two years — recently opened an office in Towson to serve business customers. BlueRidge executives plan to open a retail branch in the Baltimore area by the end of the year, while eyeing other parts of Maryland, such as Montgomery County, for growth.
BUSINESS
By By Hanah Cho | June 8, 2010
Frederick-based BlueRidge Bank said Tuesday it opened a Baltimore area branch in Towson. The bank, which was established in April 2008, also hired Tim Daly to lead the new office as executive vice president and Hugh Robinson as senior vice president. Daly previously served as senior vice president for Chevy Chase Bank's commercial banking division for the Baltimore market, while Robinson was executive vice president and senior lender at Bay National Bank in Baltimore. BlueRidge Bank has nearly $100 million in assets.
NEWS
April 3, 2007
Larkin Hamilton Birmingham 92, of Blue Ridge, Va, formerly of Glen Burnie, Md passed away Sunday April 1, 2007. He was born on June 3, 1914. He was preceded in death by his wife of 69 years Anna Steiner Birmingham, two sons, John Robert Birmingham and Larkin Hamilton Birmingham. He was retired from the AFL-CIO Meat Cutters Union of Baltimore, MD. He is survived by his children, Elizabeth Henderson and husband Thomas of Frederick, MD, Robert Birmingham and wife Carol Sue of Fincastle, VA, Anna Tackman and husband Ronald of Blue Ridge, VA, and daughter-in-law Virginia Birmingham of Westminster, MD. Also surviving are ten grandchildren, 21 great grandchildren, a great-great grandson, one sister Naomi Keller of Towson, MD and many nieces and nephews.
NEWS
November 9, 2006
On Tuesday, November 7, 2006, PEGGY MONTGOMERY, 59, of Troutville, VA, formerly of Baltimore, MD. She was employed by Wachovia Bank. She was one of the found members of St. Thomas of Canterbury Anglican Church in Roanoke, VA, where she was also a Sunday School Teacher and Altar Guild Member. She was a professed Third Order Sister of the Third Order of the Franciscans of the Divine Compassion known as Sister Mary Margaret, TDC. She was preceded in death by her husband Michael Montgomery, grandparents, Blanche and Carl Doyle and her uncle Merle Doyle.
TRAVEL
By COX NEWS SERVICE | October 8, 2006
We are driving to North Carolina to see fall foliage. Could you suggest the best time and the best scenic routes? Fall foliage typically starts in early October at high elevations in North Carolina and lasts for as long as six weeks. These colors change at different times at different elevations. Fall color predictions are not an exact science, so you should check the weekly reports by calling 800-VISIT-NC or going to visitnc.com. The Blue Ridge and Great Smoky Mountain regions showcase a variety of deep colors for the longest time at elevations from 6,684 feet at Mount Mitchell to 2,000 feet in the valleys.
FEATURES
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,SUN STAFF | December 9, 1999
When is a novelty no longer a novelty?Consider the case of the animated Rock Santa Collectible, last holiday season's sleeper, this year's emblem of X-mas excess.Before the seasonal hype began in earnest, the Santa quartet -- a cowboy Holly Jolly Santa, a Coca Cola-toting Santa and two traditional Santas, one black, one white, that groove to "Jingle Bell Rock" or "Rockin' Around the Christmas Tree" -- seemed the ideal gift item for your cynical brother-in-law. Plug Santa in, his bells jingle and belly jiggles in synergistic schmaltz and irony.
NEWS
March 14, 2004
On March 12, 2004, VIRGINIA P. MECKEL (nee Peck), of Blue Ridge, Georgia; beloved wife of the late Francis Michael Meckel; loving grandmother of Paula Brown; great-grandmother of Devin Brown; and niece of Martha Peck. A Funeral Service will be held at Oak Grove Baptist Church, Bel Air, MD on Monday, March 15 at 1 P.M. Interment will be in Church of Christ Cemetery, Blue Ridge, GA. Friends may call at the church from 12 noon to 1 P.M., prior to the service. In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made to the American Cancer Society, P.O. Box 572, Bel Air, MD, 21014.
TRAVEL
By LORI SEARS | July 23, 2006
FloydFest Sorry, Pink Floyd fans. Despite the name, FloydFest isn't exactly for you. It is, however, for music fans of a different sort. The Floyd Fest 5: Roots Alive music festival celebrates world music as well as bluegrass, folk, reggae, African and Appalachian sounds. Oh, and the name? FloydFest takes place near Floyd, Va. This year's festival kicks off Thursday and runs through July 30 in the Blue Ridge Mountains. With acts such as Los Lobos, Eddie From Ohio, Iris Dement, Cyro Baptista and Beat the Donkey, Donna the Buffalo, Railroad Earth, Akoya Afrobeat Ensemble and Gabby La La, the festival offers an eclectic mix of tunes each day. The festival also features a vast arts-and-crafts marketplace and foods of all kinds.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.