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By Jim Abbott and Jim Abbott,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | July 2, 2001
You heard it here first: Backstreet Boys will break up in November! Brian and Nick will pursue successful solo careers. Howie will do stand-up comedy and Kevin will hit the lecture circuit. And A.J.'s shot at going solo might make him wish that the group was back together. That noise you just heard? It's the sound of countless young girls fainting at the mere thought of a world without Backstreet Boys. Before panic grips an unsuspecting nation, it's time to confess that this news has not been confirmed by any official sources.
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FEATURES
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,SUN STAFF | June 11, 1998
Alex Schmidt has had a crazy month or two. Scarcely back from her honeymoon in Nevis and St. Barts, she'll be dancing the night away tomorrow at the Blue Moon Ball to benefit the League: Serving People with Disabilities. As a member of the Friends of the League, Schmidt has put a lot of hard work into the event, and it's a safe bet that the account executive for the Jewish Times and Style magazine will be putting just as much hard work into her big-band swing moves. That Schmidt, a veteran of both Chanel and Armani PR departments, will be making those moves in haute designer style, is a given.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Laura Rottenberg and Laura Rottenberg,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 24, 1996
The blue moon is the second full moon to shine in a single month. This doesn't happen too often - therefore, the expression "once in a blue moon."The Blue Moon Dining House, opened just two months ago in Fells Point, is a rare find worthy of its name. It serves modestly priced breakfast, lunch and dinner and is especially adept at the morning meal. Ethereal biscuits, gooey cinnamon rolls and crisp hash browns are certainly "heavenly bodies."Blue Moon's menu is printed with the command, "Support our space program," the front door bears a poster for the Hubble Space Telescope, and the bathroom is home to a cool glow-in-the-dark moon.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,SUN RESTAURANT CRITIC | August 29, 1996
Demonstrating a rare ability to be all things to all men and women, the new Blue Moon Dining House (1621 Aliceanna St.) in Fells Point has a trendy espresso bar and serves a full country breakfast (biscuits and gravy, omelets and pancakes) every day till 4 p.m.Co-owner Peggy Conner describes the food as "home-style American," with the specialties being creamed soups and homemade baked goods like cinnamon rolls and pies.Hours are 6: 30 a.m. to 10 p.m. Mondays through Fridays, 7: 30 a.m. to 10 p.m. Saturdays, and 7: 30 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sundays.
FEATURES
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,SUN STAFF | June 30, 1996
Look to the sky! For one moment tonight near midnight the moon will be "blue." If the sky is clear and you see it, don't expect strange happenings. Don't expect it to actually be the color blue, though that has been known to happen now and then.The blue moon does not provoke weird behavior in man or beast, any more than any other full moon. Astronomically, it is as predictable as the rising of the sun. Meteorologically, it can signal disaster. As a metaphor, it describes two conditions: absurdity and rarity.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | January 2, 1996
The eclipse is back.After going without a total lunar eclipse visible from Maryland back yards during all of 1994 and last year, stargazers will be treated to a pair of them in 1996. Clean up the lawn chairs and set aside the evenings of April 3 and Sept. 26.No solar eclipses will be visible here in 1996, and only two will be visible anywhere. Both are partial, and you'll have to spend the mortgage money to get somewhere to see them.The rest of the year, is sprinkled with celestial events visible here (weather permitting)
NEWS
By Todd Holden | January 27, 1995
ON MONDAY there will be a rare celestial event: the second new moon of the month. It makes me think of the blue moon -- the second full moon of a month -- that appeared around this time last year.It was then that I fell in love for the second time in 30 years. I let my scarred heart be scooped up by a lovely, brown-eyed girl of grace and charm, just like in the old song.At the start of our relationship, she told me something I didn't know: "Once in a blue moon, two people fall in love," she said.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | March 18, 1994
MOTLEY CRUEMotley Crue (Elektra 61534)Because the singer is usually seen as being a band's "face," a lot of folks figured that Motley Crue would be a mess without Vince Neil. Well, they figured wrong. As "Motley Crue" makes plain, new singer John Corabi has no trouble taking Neil's place,delivering "Hooligan's Holiday" with an authoritative howl and slipping a nasty snarl into the sound of "Hammered." But the album's real strength is the noise made by the rest of Crue. From the Aerosmith-style boogie of "Welcome to the Numb" to turn-it-up crunch of "Power to the Music," this band has never sounded stronger.
NEWS
By SUSANNE TROWBRIDGE QUEEN BESS: DAREDEVIL AVIATOR Doris L. Rich Smithsonian Institution Press 153 pages. $ 18.95 and SUSANNE TROWBRIDGE QUEEN BESS: DAREDEVIL AVIATOR Doris L. Rich Smithsonian Institution Press 153 pages. $ 18.95,LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 26, 1993
TWICE IN A BLUE MOON Patricia Moyes Henry Holt 192 pages. $19.95. Patricia Moyes' series featuring Scotland Yard Superintendent Henry Tibbett and his wife, Emmy, is one of the longest-running in mystery fiction -- the first installment, "Dead Men Don't Ski," was published in 1959. But "Twice in a Blue Moon," Ms. Moyes' long-awaited new novel, is a rather bland affair, not the perfect puzzler fans have come to expect from this author.Instead of using her usual third-person voice, Ms. Moyes has innkeeper Susan Gardiner narrate the story.
FEATURES
By David Zuarawik and David Zuarawik,Sun Television Critic | November 18, 1991
It's riddled with improbabilities. Its tone careens between serious, adult comedy and campy send-up -- and never really figures out which way it wants to go. It uses stereotypes of gay men and Japanese executives, which some viewers will rightfully find offensive.The verdict: "Chance of a Lifetime," which airs at 9 tonight on WMAR-TV (Channel 2) is a pretty good made-for-TV movie.It's pretty good despite the flaws, because the broad strokes of the story are interesting and the casting of Betty White and Leslie Nielsen as lovers is almost inspired.
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