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By Laura Vozzella | July 25, 2011
Head-to-toe Blue Spandex, particularly on the campaign trail in triple-digit temperatures, is a sacrifice. Head-to-toe blue tattoos? That's real commitment. Before there was Blue Man, Jody Landers' Spandexed sidekick , there was Jim Hall, the retired city planner who covered nearly every inch of his body in blue-and-black tattooed swirls . Baltimore City Paper did a feature on Hall back in 2009. My colleague Richard Gorelick pointed that article out to me last week, as I was reporting on Blue Man. I wondered why The Sun had never profiled the guy -- until I read the story and realized how much the body art was intertwined with non-family newspaper fare.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | December 15, 2011
Composer Bob Christianson is nothing if not versatile. He wrote a lot of pulsating music that accompanied episodes about several, um, energetic women in New York on the HBO series "Sex and the City. " He has provided themes for Travel Channel's "Mysteries of the Museum" and "Inside the Grand Canyon," and the Military Channel's "The Day After D-Day," to name a few more. His credits also include themes for sports programs and promos on ABC and ESPN. "Which is funny," Christianson said, "because I am not a sports person.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Laura Vozzella, The Baltimore Sun | July 24, 2011
Bluer than Democrat-rich Baltimore! Able to distract morning commuters with a single wave! Look! On the street corner with Jody Landers! It's actual fun in this year's mayoral campaign! Blue Man, a mysterious figure in a full-body Spandex suit, has swooped in from who-knows-where to help former City Councilman Joseph T. "Jody" Landers with his weekday morning car waves. There's no telling if the seeming superhero can help Landers in September's Democratic primary, but he has already succeeded in injecting some zip into an otherwise snoozy race.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Laura Vozzella | July 25, 2011
Head-to-toe Blue Spandex, particularly on the campaign trail in triple-digit temperatures, is a sacrifice. Head-to-toe blue tattoos? That's real commitment. Before there was Blue Man, Jody Landers' Spandexed sidekick , there was Jim Hall, the retired city planner who covered nearly every inch of his body in blue-and-black tattooed swirls . Baltimore City Paper did a feature on Hall back in 2009. My colleague Richard Gorelick pointed that article out to me last week, as I was reporting on Blue Man. I wondered why The Sun had never profiled the guy -- until I read the story and realized how much the body art was intertwined with non-family newspaper fare.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jennifer Choi | February 14, 2008
Blue Man Group satirically deconstructs "the perfect rock concert experience" with an interactive live show for the How to Be a Megastar Tour 2.0, which comes to 1st Mariner Arena tomorrow. The show's message actually plays against its title. "We want people to walk away feeling like the real magic of rock concerts comes from their tribal and communal elements as opposed to mega-stardom," says Chris Wink, co-founder of the group. The show starts at 8 p.m. The venue is at 201 W. Baltimore St. Tickets are $49.50-$85.
SPORTS
By PETER SCHMUCK | March 15, 2008
I can't believe my good fortune. The Blue Man Group is scheduled to appear tonight at the BankAtlantic Center in nearby Sunrise, which means I don't have to go all the way to Las Vegas to find something to do on a Saturday night. I've never gotten the Blue Man phenomenon, but maybe I'm in the minority, since ticket prices range from $49.50 to $75. I'd rather spend tonight painting the town red, though.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rashod D. Ollison | May 15, 2003
Blue Man Group / Warner Theatre About two years ago, the Blue Man Group, with Jill Scott and Moby, gave a memorable performances on the Grammys. With its inventive use of percussion, the Blue Man Group has become a sensation and released its first CD last month. The ensemble plays the Warner Theatre Sunday night. Tickets are $30-$40; show starts at 7. Call Ticketmaster at 410-481-SEAT or visit www.ticket master.com. Matchbox 20, Sugar Ray, Maroon 5 / MCI Center Matchbox 20, Sugar Ray (right)
TRAVEL
By Tom Parsons and Tom Parsons,McClatchy-Tribune | August 9, 2009
Travelers looking for lodging can find bargains this year. Occupancy has been down at many destinations, and the deals keep coming to fill those empty rooms. Orlando-area hotels have felt the slump, and rates have dropped compared to years past. When we recently priced rooms for mid-August travel, we found rates at three-star properties for as low as $65 per night and at four-star properties for as low as $74 per night. Sample Orlando promotions include two free consecutive nights when you pay for three nights at the Nickelodeon Family Suites.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 1, 2003
Day I Forgot (Columbia) * * * Pete Yorn is tangled up in blue, forever singing to himself about how it all went so wrong. His weapons are an acoustic guitar and a weary voice, but he's less like Dylan than a bridge between Paul Westerberg and Jimmy Webb, both idiosyncratic songwriters with an unnatural flair for melody and inevitable heartache. Yorn makes pure pop minus the sugar. That is already enough to make him more interesting than such amiable young singer-songwriter types as John Mayer.
ENTERTAINMENT
By M.M. McDermott | July 18, 2011
I was all ready this weekend to pull together a diatribe complaining about just how tepid the marketing for the mayoral election has been. But then I saw the above photo. With the exception of Otis Rolley's polished branding campaign, everyone else in the field has failed to put out anything that transcends a project in Microsoft Paint. Enter BlueManBmore. What mayoral candidate Jody Landers has lacked in dynamic advertising, he's certainly made up for in ... well, I'm not sure.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Laura Vozzella, The Baltimore Sun | July 24, 2011
Bluer than Democrat-rich Baltimore! Able to distract morning commuters with a single wave! Look! On the street corner with Jody Landers! It's actual fun in this year's mayoral campaign! Blue Man, a mysterious figure in a full-body Spandex suit, has swooped in from who-knows-where to help former City Councilman Joseph T. "Jody" Landers with his weekday morning car waves. There's no telling if the seeming superhero can help Landers in September's Democratic primary, but he has already succeeded in injecting some zip into an otherwise snoozy race.
ENTERTAINMENT
By M.M. McDermott | July 18, 2011
I was all ready this weekend to pull together a diatribe complaining about just how tepid the marketing for the mayoral election has been. But then I saw the above photo. With the exception of Otis Rolley's polished branding campaign, everyone else in the field has failed to put out anything that transcends a project in Microsoft Paint. Enter BlueManBmore. What mayoral candidate Jody Landers has lacked in dynamic advertising, he's certainly made up for in ... well, I'm not sure.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | November 4, 2010
From the opening electronic tickertape messages, relaying birthday greetings and instructions on audience behavior, to the deliriously multisensory finale, the Blue Man Group show at the Hippodrome Theatre packs a wallop. It's a big, loud, funny, silly, visually arresting production. There's no point in trying to classify what these performers, with their trademark blue faces and bald, earless heads, do onstage for the better part of 90 minutes. It's much easier to go with the flow — and duck down in your seat when those guys start roaming the aisles.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | October 31, 2010
When attending a performance by Blue Man Group, resistance isn't so much futile as it is spectacularly beside the point. Audience members have been scooping up tickets for more than two decades in the hopes of experiencing the Blue Man phenomenon, in which sensory overload on a grand scale results in the joyous, communal feeling similar to that of a group of strangers watching fireworks together on the Fourth of July. The group's fans flock to the extravaganza in spite of the fact that it is so loud and bright that the earth vibrates and they temporarily forget who and where they are. To the contrary — it's the whole reason they go. But, for the first time, catching the show won't require a road trip to someplace like New York or Boston.
TRAVEL
By Tom Parsons and Tom Parsons,McClatchy-Tribune | August 9, 2009
Travelers looking for lodging can find bargains this year. Occupancy has been down at many destinations, and the deals keep coming to fill those empty rooms. Orlando-area hotels have felt the slump, and rates have dropped compared to years past. When we recently priced rooms for mid-August travel, we found rates at three-star properties for as low as $65 per night and at four-star properties for as low as $74 per night. Sample Orlando promotions include two free consecutive nights when you pay for three nights at the Nickelodeon Family Suites.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,rashod.ollison@baltsun.com | November 13, 2008
Part of the problem was that he was trying to become a star in the wrong era. Throughout the '90s, when blustery hip-hop and anodyne neo-soul dominated pop and urban charts, Anthony Hamilton was an unabashed throwback to the vulnerable, lacerated sound of early '70s R&B. Think Bobby Womack and Johnnie Taylor. His music was redolent of raw Southern blues. Yet the lyrical swagger was unmistakably that of a man who came of age during the '80s. But Hamilton, 36, couldn't catch a break as several record deals fizzled.
SPORTS
By PETER SCHMUCK | March 15, 2008
I can't believe my good fortune. The Blue Man Group is scheduled to appear tonight at the BankAtlantic Center in nearby Sunrise, which means I don't have to go all the way to Las Vegas to find something to do on a Saturday night. I've never gotten the Blue Man phenomenon, but maybe I'm in the minority, since ticket prices range from $49.50 to $75. I'd rather spend tonight painting the town red, though.
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