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Blue Crab

NEWS
May 23, 2007
DNR, biotech institute sign crab study pact Maryland's Department of Natural Resources and the University of Maryland's Biotechnology Institute have signed a 10-year agreement that will help researchers continue a multimillion-dollar effort to study the blue crab. The agreement, officially announced yesterday, lets the researchers continue to use Piney Point, an old state oyster hatchery in Southern Maryland. Since 2004, scientists with the Center for Marine Biotechnology, which is part of the biotechnology institute, have been using Piney Point to raise crabs bred in their hatchery in Baltimore's Inner Harbor.
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NEWS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,Sun reporter | May 7, 2007
In a basement laboratory tucked amid the tourist attractions of Baltimore's Inner Harbor, two Israeli-born scientists are unlocking the mysteries of the Chesapeake Bay blue crab. Over the past five years, Yonathan Zohar and Odi Zmora have spent most of their waking hours poring over tanks filled with the snapping crustaceans and their tiny offspring at a University of Maryland lab on Pratt Street. They feed the crabs homemade algae tailored to their life stage. The researchers control the water temperature, light and salinity, and document the crustaceans' every move as they shed their shells, mate and reproduce.
NEWS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,Sun reporter | November 3, 2006
The Chesapeake Bay's signature seafood species are in better straits than ocean fish because state regulations help to prevent overfishing. But experts say the bay's rockfish, oysters and crabs continue to face a mighty struggle against pollution and loss of habitat. A study in the journal Science, which will be released today, warns that marine life in the ocean is being overfished at such a rapid rate that all species are heading for a "global collapse" by the year 2048.
NEWS
By STEPHANIE SHAPIRO and STEPHANIE SHAPIRO,SUN REPORTER | August 30, 2006
With the bloated proportions (in miniature) of a Thanksgiving Day parade float, a fast-food calorie count and a puzzle-box construction that defies the most rudimentary of table manners, the fried hard crab is a celebration of culinary excess and old Chesapeake Bay ingenuity. Once a widespread specialty, it still can be found at a smattering of local crab houses, including Tall Oaks in Pasadena, L.P. Steamers in South Baltimore, Gunning's in Hanover and Magothy Seafood Crab Deck and Tiki Bar in Arnold.
NEWS
By RONA KOBELL and RONA KOBELL,SUN REPORTER | June 17, 2006
TAYLORS ISLAND-- --The crab is bursting. Slowly, it kicks its legs and thrusts forward, pushing and writhing. In a matter of minutes, it wriggles out of its shell, its bluish skin soft as Jell-O. Bonnie Willey doesn't have much time before the crab hardens again. The tiny redhead plucks the crab from its plywood tank, plops it onto newsprint lining an old milk crate, and puts the crate in a walk-in cooler. She carries out this ritual as she has dozens of times a day, thousands of times every summer, for the past 20 years.
NEWS
By STEPHANIE DESMON and STEPHANIE DESMON,SUN REPORTER | May 1, 2006
The routine isn't rehearsed, but after hundreds of appearances on the QVC shopping channel over the past decade, Ron and Margie Kauffman know what they'll say when it comes to the millions of Maryland-style crab cakes they sell under the brand Chesapeake Bay Gourmet. There is plenty of talk about the large lumps of crabmeat, about the company's ties to Maryland and the Chesapeake. On QVC's Web site, the products are labeled "Made in USA." What the carefully worded language omits is one critical fact.
NEWS
By Gady A. Epstein and Stephanie Desmon and Sun Reporters | April 30, 2006
By 9 a.m. the crab boats have already been coming and going from the pier for close to five hours, with migrant Burmese workers laboring to unload, sort, weigh and steam crabs that are destined for dinner plates on the other side of the world. Presiding over this assembly line are Nantanee and Somsak Choeyklin, who remember when this crustacean that made them rich was only junk and they were poor. The blue swimming crab, known in Thailand as "horse crab," mottled and bluish-green, was little more than subsistence food when their parents were fishermen.
BUSINESS
By Andrew Ratner and Andrew Ratner,SUN STAFF | May 8, 2005
The stained glass blue crab formerly at Baltimore-Washington International Airport certainly evokes Callinectes sapidus, the "beautiful swimmer" of Chesapeake Bay, but its survival skills more resemble a cat's. The 400-pound, 5-foot sculpture, now crated in a Millersville warehouse, is due to return to the airport for its next life after a new $264 million terminal opens May 18. Exactly when and where remains to be determined until officials see "how the new building operates," BWI spokesman Jonathan O. Dean said.
NEWS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,SUN STAFF | April 2, 2005
Juvenile blue crabs in the Chesapeake Bay have reached their highest levels since 1997, according to a new survey, and state officials foresee a potentially bountiful crab season. The 2004-2005 winter dredge survey, conducted by researchers with Maryland Department of Natural Resources and the Virginia Institute of Marine Science, sampled crabs at 1,500 sites in the bay from December through March. During those months, crabs burrow in mud, making it easy for scientists to count them and estimate their numbers baywide.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,SUN STAFF | October 10, 2004
And you thought the A-B-Cs were simple. So, at first, did the author and illustrator of B is for Blue Crab (Sleeping Bear Press, $17.95), the new Maryland alphabet book for children. But when it came to representing the state in letters, the process evoked surprising passions. "Everywhere we went ... when I would say I'm working on an alphabet book for Maryland, they would say, `What's `A'?" said Laura Stutzman, the book's illustrator. "It got to be hysterical how people could not resist guessing what the letters were."
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