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NEWS
July 30, 2000
Crabbing isn't what it used to be in Anne Arundel. Crabs and watermen have decreased. Maryland tightened its limits on fishing times and catches a few years ago to reverse the blue crab's decline. Are these limits helping? Since the rules went into effect, commercial watermen have harvested greater numbers of the shellfish than they did before the restrictions. And crabbers often are willing to take large numbers of blue crabs at the minimum legal size. How can Maryland and Chesapeake waterman ensure that the blue crab is here to stay?
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case and The Baltimore Sun | August 7, 2014
  Governor Martin O'Malley, on behalf of Chesapeake Bay watermen and the True Blue program that promotes Maryland Blue Crab sustainability, accepted a donation of $10,270 from Flying Dog Brewery and Old Bay on Wednesday at the beer company's Frederick taproom.  The money, according to Flying Dog director of communications Erin Weston, comes from a portion of proceeds from sales of the Flying Dog Dead Rise beer, which is a collaboration with...
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NEWS
December 11, 1992
In historic Ellicott City and St. Michaels, Melissa Fulton ha built a nice business selling items bearing likenesses of the blue crab, the canvasback duck and the Baltimore oriole. But when it comes to her criticisms of the state's attempt to sell more souvenirs to offset tax losses, Ms. Fulton is dealing in red herrings.The owner of two "Celebrate Maryland" shops, Ms. Fulton has been a vocal critic of a move by the Maryland Department of Natural Resources. The department recently mailed 134,000 catalogs of souvenirs it sells at state parks.
NEWS
May 8, 2014
As summer draws near, Americans anticipate coming delights - a cabin in the woods, a blanket on a beach, a boat on a river. In Maryland, that iconic image is a table laden with steamed crabs. Thus has it been for generations in the "land of pleasant living. " It was with heavy hearts, then, that Marylanders took in the news last week from the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center in Edgewater that they could expect another season of relatively scarce, and therefore expensive, blue crabs.
SPORTS
By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,Sun Staff Writer | June 12, 1994
Earlier this year, the Department of Natural Resources announced several changes in regulations controlling the recreational and commercial harvest of blue crabs in Maryland as part of a long-term management plan for the popular species.Later this month, the DNR will hold public meetings to discuss the research and management strategies that are the basis of the five-year plan.While blue crab populations are not endangered or even threatened at this point, DNR has new regulations in place this year to ensure that crabs are not overfished.
NEWS
By Jeff Holland and Jeff Holland,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 8, 1999
ROSS SIMONS, director of the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center (SERC) near Edgewater, will unveil a traveling environmental education exhibit at a reception this evening at the Lowe House Office Building in Annapolis. "Tales of the Blue Crab" is SERC's first major traveling exhibit and will be made available to grammar schools throughout Maryland. The exhibit illustrates the life cycle of the state's famous crustaceans, showing where they live, how they grow, and other interesting things about the blue crab and how scientists learn about them.
NEWS
By Howard Libit and Howard Libit,SUN STAFF | November 14, 2003
The Chesapeake Bay's blue crab population has apparently stabilized but at such a historically low number that Maryland and Virginia must keep up efforts to limit the annual harvest, according to a study scheduled to be delivered today. The report, from some of the bay's leading crab scientists, warns that "our work to restore the blue crab is far from over" and that pressures to harvest more crabs "risk driving the stock down further, to dangerously low levels." "There is still ongoing reason to be concerned," said Thomas J. Miller, a fisheries ecologist at the University of Maryland's Chesapeake Biological Laboratory and member of the study group "We've got to maintain what I think have been some prudent measures."
NEWS
April 14, 2010
Two years ago, Maryland and Virginia agreed to greatly reduce the harvest of female blue crabs to save the declining species — much to the dismay of some watermen. Last year, the controversial plan appeared to be working. This year, the news is even better. Results of the 2009-2010 winter dredge survey show the number of crabs has reached the highest level in more than a decade. Perhaps most importantly, the number of baby crabs in the Chesapeake Bay has nearly doubled from one year ago. That's an extraordinary rebound by any standard.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SUN STAFF | July 26, 1997
Something didn't smell quite right about the scene outside the Maryland Court of Appeals in Annapolis yesterday.A mail clerk ran from the building holding a package addressed )) to a judge, set it on the grass and dashed away.Police evacuated the building off Rowe Boulevard. The bomb squad moved in. A $60,000 robot with an electronic arm whirred up, scanned the parcel with its video camera and disarmed it with a blast of water.Then, an officer in body armor ran out to take a look inside the package.
NEWS
By Joel McCord and Joel McCord,SUN STAFF | November 13, 2000
MECHANICSVILLE - Nearly everyone in the social hall of this St. Mary's County firehouse agreed that the Chesapeake Bay blue crab population is in trouble. The question was, what to do about it. And there wasn't much agreement on that. Crack down on recreational crabbers and enforce existing laws, some watermen said. Set commercial catch limits, said recreational crabbers, and ban taking female crabs. The Bi-State Blue Crab Advisory Committee has taken its show on the road, holding public meetings in schools, council chambers and fire halls to seek feedback on proposals to ease the pressure on the bay's most economically important fishery.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | May 3, 2014
A couple of years ago, the governor of Maryland stood on a dock on South River, a bushel of steamed crabs at his feet, telling everyone it was OK to eat Chesapeake blue crabs again - sort of like the mayor in "Jaws" telling everyone it was OK to go back in the water. "I am glad to report that the population of the blue crab is now at a 19-year high," the governor said in April 2012. There was so much excitement about the comeback of the blue crab that the state launched a "True Blue" marketing campaign, identifying and promoting restaurants and markets selling Chesapeake lump.
NEWS
By Jenn Aiosa and Mark Bryer | September 23, 2013
It's been five years since the Chesapeake Bay blue crab fishery was declared a disaster, and despite progress using science-based guidelines for protecting female crabs, the iconic Chesapeake crustacean is still not out of the woods. The Baltimore Sun's call for management change ("Blue outlook for blue crabs," Sept. 18) hits the mark; the bay's blue crab needs better management based on baywide total catch limits, allocations among the states and licensed fishermen and much greater accountability for all blue crab harvesting.
NEWS
September 17, 2013
By most accounts, this has been a good year for eating Maryland blue crabs - just not by human beings. The Chesapeake Bay crab harvest is down, in part because of predators and cannibalism, but that's not the whole story. In 2011, Maryland officials reported a record year for blue crab reproduction. It was such a successful spawn that most people in the seafood industry were licking their lips with anticipation. Surely, harvests would rise as those baby crabs matured into adulthood in late 2012 and the first half of 2013.
NEWS
By Jenn Aiosa | July 15, 2013
If there's one thing nearly everybody in the Chesapeake Bay region can agree upon, it's that summer isn't summer without blue crabs. Unfortunately, this regional staple has experienced its share of problems over the past few years, impacting supply, prices and the livelihoods of all those who work in the crabbing industry. Thankfully, recent leadership from Maryland watermen has put this fishery on a course to produce more crabs and more profits. For more than two years, Maryland watermen and the Department of Natural Resources (DNR)
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | April 1, 2013
The soft-shell crab sandwich would join Maryland's roster of state symbols under legislation passed Monday night by the Senate. The 43-1 vote sends the bill to the House of Delegates, where it faces an uncertain fate. The House has generally been less enthusiastic about symbol bills than the upper chamber. According to the Maryland Manual, the state has 23 state symbols, including the blue crab as state crustacean. Since the blue crab in its recently molted form is the key ingredient in the classic soft-shell sandwich, the bill would make the species Callinectes sapidus doubly symbolic.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | March 31, 2013
April 1 is the official start to the blue crab harvest in Maryland. But don't reach for your mallet just yet. "It's not time for crabs," said Jessica Borowski, a manager at Midtown BBQ and Brew. "It's too cold out. " The crabs seem to agree. The Chesapeake Bay's water temperature hasn't risen enough for the crabs to become active - and catchable. Consumers set on Maryland crabs will see limited availability for now - and prices to match. Prices for Chesapeake Bay crabs are typically high at the start of the season, and people who want them in April will have to pay even more than usual.
NEWS
By Joel McCord and Joel McCord,SUN STAFF | January 6, 2001
Maryland's fisheries managers are for the first time considering setting daily catch limits for blue crabs as part of a plan to protect the most economically important species in Chesapeake Bay. Eric Schwaab, director of fisheries for the state Department of Natural Resources, floated the idea yesterday at a meeting of the Chesapeake Bay Commission in Annapolis. There is "not a lot of sympathy" for catch limits among watermen, he conceded, but limits would "be particularly valuable in protecting" the female crabs migrating to the mouth of the bay in the fall to spawn.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,Sun Staff Writer | April 2, 1995
Buoyed by a remission in the diseases that have ravaged Chesapeake Bay oysters, Maryland watermen enjoyed their biggest harvest in three years during the 5 1/2 -month season that ended last week.Though the oyster harvest tally won't be complete for several weeks, watermen so far have reported catching nearly 132,000 bushels -- more than a 60 percent increase over the record-low catch of the year before, says the state Department of Natural Resources (DNR)."These were the best oysters in five or six years," said Tony Rippons Jr., a resident of Dorchester County who owns Tony's Seafood on U.S. 40 in Catonsville.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | September 2, 2012
Marylanders looking to pile their picnic tables with crabs for one last send-off to summer this Labor Day will likely have to do so with a less-than-jumbo variety of the state's favorite crustacean, thanks to Hurricane Isaac. The storm that tore through Louisiana last week did significant damage to Gulf Coast docks and roads, disrupting a regular supply to Maryland — and elsewhere — of the jumbo and large crabs that, for a variety of reasons, aren't being harvested locally this season.
NEWS
By Tom Horton | August 6, 2012
More crabs to catch and fewer rules by which to catch 'em. That'd be the Holy Grail for Chesapeake watermen. It's why top crabbers in Maryland, from Havre de Grace to Smith Island, have been traveling monthly, for the past 18 months, to long and sometimes contentious meetings with state regulators. Their Blue Crab Design Team is a unique and immensely hopeful development in the long history of harvesting the bay's seafood. I give watermen and Maryland's Department of Natural Resources lots of credit for trying it. The goal is to break with the commercial fisheries management that's been traditional here and other places - regulators trying to make it harder to fish for watermen who in turn try to fish harder.
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