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By Charles Stein and Charles Stein,Boston Globe | April 29, 1992
It was a bargain that held for 30 years: U.S. blue-collar workers produced more and in return were rewarded with higher wages.But in the 1980s employers failed to live up to their end of the bargain.Despite a solid 26 percent gain in manufacturing productivity, workers saw their real wages -- adjusted for inflation -- fall by 8 percent during the decade, according to a new study. Instead of boosting salaries, the productivity gains were used to keep prices low in the face of harsh international competition.
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BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | January 18, 2011
As host of the Discovery Channel show "Dirty Jobs," Mike Rowe has taken work as a sewer inspector, pig farmer, mud bath mixer, maggot farmer, olive oil presser, and pigeon poop cleaner-upper. But all that's easy money compared to what could be his biggest challenge yet — convincing America that blue-collar work, especially the kind that may turn a stomach or break a back, is noble and necessary. The TV personality and Baltimore native has extended his "dirty boy" brand into a website, MikeRoweWorks.com, to highlight the decline in the trades and boost enrollment in trade schools.
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BUSINESS
By Knight-Ridder Newspapers | August 12, 1993
DETROIT -- As strategies for 1993 bargaining between the United Auto Workers and Big Three automakers begin to unfold, General Motors shows no signs of backing off an emotional demand: an end to virtually free health care for blue-collar workers.GM's key demands so far:* Payments in excess of $100 per worker per month for basic medical coverage. UAW workers now pay nothing except for office visit charges and $3 to $5 for prescriptions, if they use traditional Blue Cross coverage.* Higher out-of-pocket expenses for workers who have perceived health risks, like smoking, than for workers who don't.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | September 11, 2003
Three series premiere tonight, and the best that can be said about them is that they offer a handy, one-night snapshot of what an overwhelmingly sorry lineup of new programs the networks are offering this fall. UPN's The Mullets is not just bad, it's maddeningly awful. Its depiction of working-class life through the knuckle-headed behavior of its two leading characters, brothers Dwayne (Michael Weaver) and Denny (David Hornsby) Mullet is television stereoptyping at its worst. Promotional materials circulated by UPN describe the brothers as "blue-collar, wrestling-loving, lighthearted, optimistic guys who sport the hairstyle that bears their surname - identical mullet haircuts."
BUSINESS
By Charles Stein and Charles Stein,Boston Globe | April 29, 1992
It was a bargain that held for 30 years: U.S. blue-collar workers produced more and in return were rewarded with higher wages.But in the 1980s employers failed to live up to their end of the bargain.Despite a solid 26 percent gain in manufacturing productivity, workers saw their real wages -- adjusted for inflation -- fall by 8 percent during the decade, according to a new study. Instead of boosting salaries, the productivity gains were used to keep prices low in the face of harsh international competition.
NEWS
By Dan Thanh Dang and Dan Thanh Dang,SUN STAFF | June 26, 1998
Members of two Annapolis municipal unions overwhelmingly approved new one-year contracts last night that give 2 percent pay raises to police officers and blue-collar workers.Both unions will see the increase in their paychecks starting July 1 even though the city council has yet to approve both contracts.Under their contract, police officers will contribute 1 percent less to their pensions, similar to a provision in the pact that firefighters approved earlier this week. The city will assume the 1 percent.
NEWS
By Shanon D. Murray and Shanon D. Murray,SUN STAFF | November 9, 1997
It seemed to be an ideal match: a federally funded program that brings residents in East Baltimore by van to low-wage jobs in warehouses and distribution centers along the U.S. 1 corridor in Howard County.But three months after the Bridges to Work program was launched, workers aren't in the targeted jobs. Instead, they are largely working in the two new shopping centers in the county, Long Gate Center in Ellicott City and Columbia Crossing, where stores and restaurants are scrambling to fill $6- to $10-an-hour jobs.
NEWS
By Joe Nawrozki and Joe Nawrozki,Sun Staff Writer | October 15, 1994
Some were young, full of energy and dreams.Most were older, unemployed, in the middle of life and agitated bill collectors who call them by their first names, or worse.Whatever their reasons, a couple of hundred people showed up at Dundalk Community College's Blue Collar Job Fair yesterday, hoping to put their lives in order.Sally Park, who is 47, unemployed and raising a daughter who wants to go to college, was one of them. She's enrolled in a six-month job training program at the Baltimore Career Development Center in Essex and tested the waters with employers yesterday.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,SUN STAFF | April 12, 2000
Consensus continues to elude negotiators for Anne Arundel County and the union representing 860 blue-collar county employees. Union representatives rejected Monday the county's latest offer: raises totaling 6 percent over three years. "Our members would not have been able to support that," said Scott Harmon, president of Local 582 of the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees. The union asked for a 3 percent raise next year, with items such as the restoration of longevity pay to pre-1995 levels.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,SUN STAFF | February 2, 2001
Avoiding the rancor that doomed last year's contract talks, the county and a labor union said yesterday that they have agreed tentatively to a new contract covering more than 800 blue-collar employees. Union members, who include public works and maintenance employees, will vote on the proposal Feb. 28. In June, members overwhelmingly rejected a tentative, three-year agreement in a vote that the union's president attributed to acrimonious negotiations with the county. Details of the new proposal will not be made public until the middle of this month at the earliest, giving officials of Local 582 of the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees time to inform its 817 members, said county spokesman John A. Morris.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,SUN STAFF | February 2, 2001
Avoiding the rancor that doomed last year's contract talks, the county and a labor union said yesterday that they have agreed tentatively to a new contract covering more than 800 blue-collar employees. Union members, who include public works and maintenance employees, will vote on the proposal Feb. 28. In June, members overwhelmingly rejected a tentative, three-year agreement in a vote that the union's president attributed to acrimonious negotiations with the county. Details of the new proposal will not be made public until the middle of this month at the earliest, giving officials of Local 582 of the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees time to inform its 817 members, said county spokesman John A. Morris.
BUSINESS
By Kristine Henry and Kristine Henry,SUN STAFF | September 10, 2000
The shortage of skilled workers in the manufacturing industry means David R. Gischel has two options. He can either accept printing jobs he's not sure his company can handle, or refuse the business. "We turn away jobs, then they might not come back," said Gischel, vice president and co-founder of Victor Graphics Inc. in Southwest Baltimore, which prints material for colleges and universities and is looking to add three or four more workers. "It affects our relationships with our customers."
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,SUN STAFF | May 23, 2000
The Anne Arundel County Council played referee yesterday as the county and the union representing about 1,000 blue-collar county workers jousted over whether those employees should receive pay raises next year of 2 percent or 4.6 percent. By Wednesday, the council is expected to make a recommendation aimed at resolving the contract stalemate. An independent fact-finder has sided with the union, calling its request reasonable and affordable. But even if the council supports the union's demand, it will be up to County Executive Janet S. Owens to allocate the money in a supplemental budget.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,SUN STAFF | April 12, 2000
Consensus continues to elude negotiators for Anne Arundel County and the union representing 860 blue-collar county employees. Union representatives rejected Monday the county's latest offer: raises totaling 6 percent over three years. "Our members would not have been able to support that," said Scott Harmon, president of Local 582 of the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees. The union asked for a 3 percent raise next year, with items such as the restoration of longevity pay to pre-1995 levels.
NEWS
By Dan Thanh Dang and Dan Thanh Dang,SUN STAFF | June 26, 1998
Members of two Annapolis municipal unions overwhelmingly approved new one-year contracts last night that give 2 percent pay raises to police officers and blue-collar workers.Both unions will see the increase in their paychecks starting July 1 even though the city council has yet to approve both contracts.Under their contract, police officers will contribute 1 percent less to their pensions, similar to a provision in the pact that firefighters approved earlier this week. The city will assume the 1 percent.
NEWS
By Dan Thanh Dang and Dan Thanh Dang,SUN STAFF | June 25, 1998
Members of two Annapolis unions are to vote tonight on whether to end five months of contentious contract negotiations and accept the city's offer of a 2 percent pay raise.While officials of the unit of the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees that represents blue-collar workers say its members are on the verge of accepting the proposal, it was not clear what action the Annapolis police union would take.Claiming that Annapolis police officers make less than their peers in comparable jurisdictions, police union officials have stuck by their demands for a 4 percent raise and better retirement benefits.
NEWS
By Dan Thanh Dang and Dan Thanh Dang,SUN STAFF | June 25, 1998
Members of two Annapolis unions are to vote tonight on whether to end five months of contentious contract negotiations and accept the city's offer of a 2 percent pay raise.While officials of the unit of the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees that represents blue-collar workers say its members are on the verge of accepting the proposal, it was not clear what action the Annapolis police union would take.Claiming that Annapolis police officers make less than their peers in comparable jurisdictions, police union officials have stuck by their demands for a 4 percent raise and better retirement benefits.
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