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BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | January 28, 1992
NEW YORK -- Stock prices were mixed yesterday, with blue chips posting small gains while the broader market was weak. Many cautious investors moved to the sidelines ahead of the president's State of the Union Message tonight.The Dow Jones industrial average rose 7.83 points to finish at 3,240.61, but all the other leading indexes wound up with losses.Volume on the New York Stock Exchange was almost 191 million shares, down from 214.6 million Friday.Gaining issues held a slim lead over losers as the Big Board composite slipped 0.23, to 228.94.
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SPORTS
By Josh Stirn and Special to The Baltimore Sun | September 26, 2014
Editor's note: Each week, InsideMdSports.com provides this blog with a Maryland recruiting feature that previously appeared as premium content on its site. This article has been updated to reflect the fact that Perry Dozier Jr., who was considering Maryland for his final official visit, will visit Louisville instead. Diamond Stone , the top-ranked center and No. 5 player in the 247Sports Composite rankings for the Class of 2015 has a final five of Wisconsin, Connecticut, Duke, Oklahoma State and Maryland.
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FEATURES
By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Special to The Sun | March 11, 1995
It's hard to say precisely how dull a TV night this is, but I'll try: This is a really dull night for TV. Really, really dull. So dull, in fact, I don't have a clue about how to fill the rest of this column. But I'll think of something.* "Any Which Way You Can" (8 p.m.-10 p.m., Channel 2) -- I have a lot of respect for Clint Eastwood, and I usually like writing about this movie, because Eastwood's orangutan co-star usually inspires me to make up another dumb monkey joke. Q: "If a monkey was president, where would he go on vacation?"
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,tim.smith@baltsun.com | August 27, 2009
The walls of the up-market, by-appointment-only Thomas Segal Gallery are usually filled with the work of what director Jennifer Strasbaugh calls "blue chip artists" - the likes of Jasper Johns, Robert Rauschenberg, Cy Twombly and Elsworth Kelly. Not to mention Wolf Kahn, whose distinctively colored oils and pastels the gallery has featured extensively for more than 30 years. Kahn is well represented in the latest Segal show, "Landscapes and Exteriors," but he's sharing space this time, in something of a departure for the gallery, which has been in Baltimore for 13 years after two decades in Boston.
BUSINESS
By Bill Atkinson | August 27, 2000
When some of the world's economies were shaking two years ago, and the Federal Reserve Board slashed interest rates, old-line blue-chip stocks were about to start sizzling. These days, many investors are snubbing such stocks. They aren't sexy, they don't grow fast enough and they are not a major force in the "new economy," detractors say. But Gerald Scheinker, a Legg Mason Wood Walker Inc. broker, is snapping up blue chips at steep discounts. "These companies are becoming screaming buys," he says.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | February 18, 1994
For just about an hour, "Blue Chips" seems to shape up as a smart, tough, cynical look at big-time college basketball as a hustling coach (played by Nick Nolte) tries to upgrade his faltering program by importing three blue-chip prospects.But then it turns into an extended version of Edvard Munch's "The Scream," while Nolte, consumed with guilt about the under-the-table payments he's tacitly permitted, runs around clasping his hands against his ears and opening his mouth in primal agony like the twisted Munch-kin of the famous painting.
BUSINESS
By Julius Westheimer | June 17, 1998
WHERE WILL THE stock market go from here? Where should you put money now?"When is enough enough? The answer is now. The average stock fund rose 11.51 percent in the first quarter. If that performance continues, this year's gain will be 60.79 percent, an unreasonable expectation. Count your blessings, count your profits and start selling." (Investment Quality Trends.)"Don't be misled by occasional surges in the Dow Jones average. More important than blue-chip strength is the broad market's horrid action.
BUSINESS
By Lynnley Browning and Lynnley Browning,BOSTON GLOBE | June 27, 1999
BOSTON -- Putnam Investments strode into the mutual fund arena this decade with sure-footed investment performance and a knockout sales strategy that made its hometown rival, Fidelity Investments, take notice. But lately, the old-line firm has taken a few blows.After years of blistering growth, nearly as much money is flowing out of Putnam's funds as is coming in. The firm's fixed-income unit, once among the nation's hottest, is struggling to regain its footing after sinking returns, client defections and a jarring reorganization.
BUSINESS
By Andrew Leckey and Andrew Leckey,1987 Tribune Media Services, Inc | April 10, 1991
The dramatic rise in the value of small growth-company stocks is an answer to prayer for investment letters.No one much needed the advice of pundits the past few years when highly publicized, well-researched blue chips were the favorites of a cautious public. Investment letter subscriptions faltered. There was little interest in the diamonds in the rough that these publications thrive on.Perhaps investors have had their speculative appetites whetted again. There's been a near-50 percent gain in small-stock indexes since last October, and they haven't faltered as much during recent market pullbacks as their larger brethren.
BUSINESS
By Bloomberg Business News | June 18, 1993
NEW YORK -- U.S. stocks closed mixed yesterday as weak transportation, technology and retail issues offset a late burst of computer-driven buy orders in blue chips.Sluggish overseas markets failed to give a favorable lead for investors as Germany's Bundesbank kept interest rates unchanged.The late rally in blue chips was tied to today's quarterly options and futures expiration, as institutional investors reinvested cash from expiring contracts in underlying stocks.That move briefly carried the Dow Jones industrial average to a session high of 3,524.
SPORTS
By DAN CONNOLLY and DAN CONNOLLY,dan.connolly@baltsun.com | November 18, 2008
The Orioles have taken the first step in their pursuit of Maryland-born first baseman Mark Teixeira. "We have had discussions with his representative," club president Andy MacPhail said yesterday. The Orioles contacted Teixeira's agent, Scott Boras, on Friday, the first day clubs were allowed to officially court free agents, MacPhail said. There were no offers; Boras indicated he would get back to the Orioles when he wanted to talk specifics. It was simply an initial conversation between two deliberate, thorough men in a process that will take weeks, maybe months before resolution.
SPORTS
By RICK MAESE | May 30, 2008
One by one, the e-mails started popping up this week in very important inboxes at very big schools. At Southern California, at Florida, at Texas. At every university that belongs to a Bowl Championship Series conference, in fact. "Our new service is designed to assist clients who understand the consequences of relying on perfunctory certifications of high-profile prospects," it read. Huh? Here's the interpretation: Your school can't properly research a prospective student-athlete's background.
NEWS
April 16, 2008
School. Track. Junior Days. Spring games. SATs. Official visits. Summer workouts. The start of the 2008 football season. Narrowing the list of colleges to five. Going for another state football championship. Making a college choice. Over the next 10 months, that's my schedule. Go to school and track practice five days a week. I've been visiting some schools for their Junior Days - which is when colleges invite some of the top junior football players in the country. I try to ask them as many questions about their school as possible.
NEWS
March 23, 2007
The Baltimore school system has been a leader in providing early learning opportunities for low-income students, including kindergarten and pre-kindergarten classes. But just as the system is required to provide almost-universal pre-K, it's coming up short. At a budget hearing this week for the next academic year, interim schools CEO Charlene Cooper Boston presented an expansion plan for pre-K classes that doesn't meet the need. She and her staff must come up with a plan that covers all eligible children.
BUSINESS
By Laura Smitherman and Laura Smitherman,Sun reporter | October 8, 2006
The future looked so bright in the third quarter. Oil prices fell as Middle East tensions eased and offshore roughnecks struck one of the largest crude discoveries in the nation's history. The Federal Reserve twice took a pass on raising interest rates that affect mortgage payments and business borrowing. Investors, however, apparently weren't the Pollyannas and piled into larger, blue-chip stocks considered safer havens that had long been overlooked in favor of fast-growing small-cap stocks.
SPORTS
By BALTIMORESUN.COM STAFF | March 21, 2006
Dan, Bowie: Hello Heather! I agree with all of your responses regarding recruiting. The senior and junior classes have been two of best classes "on paper" in the Gary Williams era. The problem I see is that these players are not developing over the years. Mike Jones still has the same problems he had as a freshman - the inability to put the ball on the floor and take it to the basket when defenders are taking away his jump shot, looseness with the ball when making passes, lack of lateral quickness on defense and the inability to move without the ball on offense.
BUSINESS
By JULIUS WESTHEIMER | June 21, 2000
Do you fear another interest rate increase when the Federal Reserve meets in a week? Calm down. "The Fed hiked interest rates six times in 1999-2000," says Barron's. "The last time this happened was in 1994-'95 when stocks rallied 25-30 percent after the sixth tightening. A repeat would push the Dow over 13,000 by next spring." THINK SMALL: "This year, the S&P 500 gyrated over 2 percent on 20 percent of trading days," says Smart Money. "We suffered such volatility twice before - the sickening 1974 slide and just before the 1987 crash.
BUSINESS
By Gregg Wolper and Gregg Wolper,MORNINGSTAR.COM | April 8, 2001
A perplexing question facing U.S.-based investors is how much of their assets - if any - to invest abroad. Unfortunately, there's no firm answer that applies across the board. Plenty of folks have taken a shot. Academics and brokerage-house researchers, for example, have investigated the issue and determined a variety of "correct" allocations. But their reports are of little help to ordinary investors. Morningstar's John Rekenthaler, who (oddly enough) enjoys reading obscure financial research laden with complex mathematical formulas, says that in more than a decade of devouring such studies he has never seen one that has made a persuasive case in favor of a particular allocation.
FEATURES
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | September 3, 2005
IT'S GOING TO BE hard imagining Baltimore without investment broker Julius Westheimer, "Westy" to family and friends, who died Wednesday afternoon at his Pikesville home while recuperating from recent surgery. The irrepressible optimist and quintessential Baltimorean would have celebrated his 89th birthday next week. Thousands of others felt they knew this consummately friendly man through his free-lance financial columns and regular appearances for 29 years on Wall Street Week. He contributed an endless stream of colorful travel and feature pieces as well as news analyses of business and foreign affairs to The Sun, The Evening Sun and Sunday Sun Magazine for nearly half a century.
NEWS
By David Kohn and David Kohn,SUN STAFF | May 27, 2004
In an effort to raise its profile as a top research institution, the University of Maryland School of Medicine plans to spend up to $100 million over the next five years for 100 new scientists as well as support staff and equipment. The hiring has already begun. Earlier this week, the school announced that it had recruited 23 biomedical scientists from the American Red Cross' national research program. School officials described the privately funded expansion as necessary to keep up with the changing nature of scientific research, which has become increasingly collaborative.
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