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By Julie Rothman,
For The Baltimore Sun
| July 23, 2013
Brenda Stup from Ellicott City was looking for the recipe for a blue cheese pate or terrine that was served many years ago at the Kings Contrivance Restaurant in Columbia. It was served as an appetizer on a bed of greens. She said it was absolutely delicious and she used to order it every time she ate there, but it is no longer on the menu. I attempted to contact the restaurant to see if it would be willing to share their recipe but never received a response. I did, however, locate a similar-sounding recipe on whatscookingamerica.net that I thought might be close to what Stup wanted.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Julie Rothman, For The Baltimore Sun | May 14, 2014
Susan Fisher from South Bend, Ind., was looking for a recipe making a cheese ball like the one she would buy some years ago that was made and sold by a sorority in Mishawaka, Ind., as a fundraiser. She would purchase several of them each year and says, "These cheese balls were absolutely wonderful. … Everywhere I took one, people would ask me for my recipe … but of course I couldn't give it to them. " The sorority stopped selling them years ago and she has been searching, with no luck, for the recipe ever since.
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By Joe Gray and Joe Gray,Chicago Tribune | April 25, 2007
I love the bitter taste of radicchio in salads, but some people do not. Cooking this colorful member of the chicory family tames its flavor without obliterating it. In this pasta dish, the rich sweetness of the blue cheese further tempers the radicchio. Joe Gray writes for the Chicago Tribune, which provided the recipe analysis. Fusilli With Radicchio, Chicken Sausage and Blue Cheese Serves 4 -- Total time: 35 minutes 8 ounces fusilli or other shaped pasta 1 tablespoon olive oil 3 chicken sausages (about 3/4 pound)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Julie Rothman,
For The Baltimore Sun
| July 23, 2013
Brenda Stup from Ellicott City was looking for the recipe for a blue cheese pate or terrine that was served many years ago at the Kings Contrivance Restaurant in Columbia. It was served as an appetizer on a bed of greens. She said it was absolutely delicious and she used to order it every time she ate there, but it is no longer on the menu. I attempted to contact the restaurant to see if it would be willing to share their recipe but never received a response. I did, however, locate a similar-sounding recipe on whatscookingamerica.net that I thought might be close to what Stup wanted.
NEWS
By BETTY ROSBOTTOM and BETTY ROSBOTTOM,LOS ANGELES TIMES SYNDICATE | February 13, 2000
Last winter, during a visit to England's Cotswolds, my husband and I dined in a wonderful old country inn called Buckland Manor. Our dinner there was outstanding, each course a delight. Of all the dishes we sampled, one stood out as the most unusual. It was a warm Stilton souffle served unmolded and garnished with roasted pears drizzled with a walnut dressing. My spouse, a true blue cheese aficionado, could not stop talking about this first course, so I promised to try to reproduce it when we returned home.
NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Tribune Media Services | January 11, 2004
On a recent visit to New York City, I met a good friend for lunch in a small downtown restaurant. The place we chose was an adjunct of a well-known bakery and as a result, sandwiches made with freshly baked bread were the star attraction. My lunch partner ordered a tuna panini while I opted for blue cheese and apple served on toasted walnut bread. Although both sandwiches were tempting, the latter was far more interesting, so I took notes determined to try it at home. This week I have the perfect occasion to serve these delectable blue cheese inventions.
FEATURES
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,Sun Staff | May 10, 2000
Diane Van Bleikom of Johnstown, Pa., requested a recipe for a Spinning Bowl Salad. "It was a featured item at the Twentieth Century Restaurant in Youngstown, Ohio, which closed about 10 years ago," she wrote. "I'm hoping someone has the recipe, which was fabulous." From Audrey Feldkamp of Marengo, Ill., came the recipe and a touch of its history. Feldkamp wrote, "Actually, this recipe was a longtime trademark of the Blackhawk restaurant in Chicago, and they still make it today at their restaurant in Wheeling, Ill. It has a long speech that goes with it about the number of ingredients ... [and]
FEATURES
February 13, 1991
Roasted pork tenderloin served with crumbled blue cheese is a savory main dish that contains only 13 grams of fat per serving. The recipe is provided by the National Dairy Board.Roasted Pork Tenderloin2 tablespoons butter, melted1 pound pork tenderloin, trimmed of fat2 tablespoons chopped fresh parsley, or 1 tablespoon dried parsley flakes2 tablespoons chopped fresh thyme or 1 tablespoon dried thymehTC 2 tablespoons chopped fresh oregano or 1 tablespoon dried oregano leaves, crushed1 tablespoon sage1/4 teaspoon salt1/8 teaspoon ground black pepper2 cups mixed salad greens1/2 cup (2 ounces)
FEATURES
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,SUN STAFF | November 15, 2000
Elberta Johnson of Albany, Ore., requested a recipe for Blue-Cheese Salad Dressing. Donna Bullen of Baltimore responded with a recipe for Chart House Blue-Cheese Dressing, which was tester Laura Reiley's choice. "This recipe was published on a card that the restaurant distributed," Bullen says. Chart House Blue-Cheese Dressing Makes 2 1/2 cups 3/4 cup sour cream 1/2 teaspoon dry mustard 1/2 teaspoon black pepper 1/2 teaspoon salt, scant 1/3 teaspoon garlic powder, scant 1 teaspoon Worcestershire sauce 1 1/3 cups mayonnaise 4 ounces crumbled imported Danish blue cheese Combine sour cream, dry mustard, black pepper, salt, garlic powder and Worcestershire in the bowl of a food processor or blender.
NEWS
By MICHAEL DRESSER | December 28, 2005
Dow's Trademark Finest Reserve Porto ($17) Ruby port is the bottom rung of the ladder in the Oporto region of Portugal, but this example is a cut above most of its peers. And who can afford vintage port on a regular basis? This is an unusually smooth ruby, sweet but not cloying, with flavors of chocolate, berry and spices. A good, affordable dessert wine for a cold winter's night. Serve with --blue cheese, roasted nuts, chocolate desserts
NEWS
December 4, 2012
GiveCorps, a philanthropic community that gives to local nonprofit organizations, was formed because of Generation Y. It was started two years ago in an effort to help nonprofits connect with a young audience, according to Peter Jackson, the vice president of the organization. "Millennials are not only the biggest generation in history," Jackson says. "They're also the most giving. " Jackson, 27, began working with GiveCorps when it first formed and his role has continued to grow.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kit Waskom-Pollard, For The Baltimore Sun | October 10, 2012
Though it opened just last year, Gunner's Grille in Taneytown feels like it's been around forever. That's both good and bad. On the good side, the restaurant's rustic atmosphere is downright charming, and its interpretations of classics, like chicken-fried steak, are capable and comforting. Unfortunately, at times, our dinner also recalled an era of fewer dining choices (and no dining critique websites), when restaurants could get away with spotty service and food that didn't quite live up to its description.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Julie Rothman, Special to The Baltimore Sun | November 17, 2011
Adam Eagan, managing partner at the Empire Brewing Co. in Syracuse, N.Y., knows a thing or two about good food and beer. It is, after all, what he does for a living. At least four or five times during the football season he packs up his car and makes the 51/2-hour trek from upstate New York to Baltimore, where he lived for 28 years, to join some of his buddies for a "killer" tailgate in Lot H1 at M&T Bank Stadium. He was introduced to this group of foodie fans some years ago by his best friend from high school, Mark Maloney, and was impressed with what they were putting together for food and beverage at their tailgate.
ENTERTAINMENT
Baltimore Sun reporter | January 13, 2011
Glorious Wings Makes: 10 servings 20 chicken wings, cut into separate pieces – discarding the wing tips is optional (but it makes it easier to cook) 4 cups vegetable oil 1 tablespoon salt 1 tablespoon pepper 1 tablespoon Old Bay seasoning 1 teaspoon chili powder Heat oil in a large frying pan. Season wings with salt, pepper, Old Bay and chili powder. Cook wings in batches for about 10 minutes, or until the wings are fully golden brown in color. Hot sauce 4 tablespoons olive oil 1 teaspoon butter 2 tablespoons balsamic vinegar 2 tablespoons hot sauce (any brand)
NEWS
By Laura Vozzella and Laura Vozzella,Laura.vozzella@baltsun.com | October 2, 2009
One minute Eric Foster was touting cheese-making as a way to put the endangered family dairy farm on easy street. The next, his wife, Holly, was elbow deep in a vat of curds and whey, struggling to keep their morning's work from literally going down the drain. As the Fosters made Maryland's first legal batch of raw milk cheese on their Easton dairy farm this week, cheese-making didn't look particularly easy - except when compared to all the work the couple had to do to get to this point.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and Richard Gorelick,Special to The Baltimore Sun | August 13, 2009
Hull Street Blues turns 25 this year, and for a generation of Baltimoreans, Kathryn and Daniel Macatee's cozy rowhouse restaurant was the first place they had ever sat down for dinner in Locust Point. Always, its admirers are quick to credit the Macatees with keeping Hull Street Blues both ship-shape and completely unpretentious, even as the menu has expanded and the neighborhood around it has grown. Now, the Macatees have opened a casual eating spot just across the street and down the block, naming it the Whetstone Grill after the neighborhood's original name, Whetstone Point, which you can see on old lithographs and engravings (and new townhouse developments)
FEATURES
By Nancy Byal and Nancy Byal,Better Homes and Gardens Magazine | June 26, 1991
No time to heat the coals for your burgers? No problem. You can cook these juicy bacon-and-blue cheese bundles in your microwave oven in only seven minutes. Once in the bun, you won't know the difference.7/8Stuffed Turkey Burgers1/4 cup fine dry bread crumbs2 tablespoons dairy sour cream1/4 teaspoon salt1/8 teaspoon ground white pepperDash ground sage1 pound ground raw turkey4 thin slices Canadian bacon1/4 cup crumbled blue cheese4 hamburger buns, split, toasted1/4 cup cream cheese, softenedIn a large mixing bowl combine bread crumbs, sour cream, salt, pepper and sage.
NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Tribune Media Services | June 6, 2004
Both my husband and son adore thick, juicy grilled steaks and are avid fans of blue cheese. So it didn't take long for me to figure out that a main course pairing these ingredients would be a hit with these two dads on Father's Day. Michael, our son, has taken to fatherhood the way his own father did -- with boundless enthusiasm and a natural ease -- so I'm looking forward to planning a special menu in their honor. I've chosen boneless sirloins, a favorite cut of mine, but other tender cuts, such as T-bones or porterhouses, rib-eyes or even sliced tenderloins, would work equally well.
NEWS
By ROB KASPER and ROB KASPER,rob.kasper@baltsun.com | December 24, 2008
What to serve after Christmas dinner? Clark Wolf says cheese. "A nice blue cheese, a Maytag or a Rogue River, with walnuts and port. Cheese tastes better with walnuts, and walnuts are in season. Also, blue cheese makes port taste better, so you don't have to spend a lot of money on port," Wolf says. What to serve on New Year's Day? Again, Clark Wolf replies cheese. "A rich, creamy cheese, maybe a Constant Bliss from Jasper Hill Farm in Vermont - something ripe and crazy so you can eat while sipping a good sparkling wine or champagne.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,Sun reporter | July 23, 2008
Food 2.0: Secrets From the Chef Who Fed Google By Charlie Ayers DK Publishing / $25 / 2008 Along with the many perks offered employees of the juggernaut that is Google, you've probably heard about the fantastic food - healthful, plentiful and free - that's offered at the search engine's Mountain View, Calif., headquarters. The theory: Engineers will be less likely to take time to leave campus for lunch and more full of brain power to boost Google's billions. Charlie Ayers was the chef who started it all, signing on when Google had fewer than 100 employees.
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