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By Dorothy Fleetwood | March 24, 1991
One of the top events in Washington, one that draws half a million visitors annually, is the National Cherry Blossom Festival, which this year opens Easter Sunday and runs through April 7.The festival celebrates springtime and the blooming of the more than 6,000 Japanese cherry trees planted in city parks and along the Tidal Basin. The first trees arrived in 1912 as a gift from Japan to symbolize the friendship between the two countries. The first tree was planted in March of that year by first lady Helen Herron Taft in a small ceremony that included the wife of the Japanese ambassador.
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By Laura Lefavor, The Baltimore Sun | April 5, 2013
When it comes to spring color, Washington knows how to put on a show. The National Cherry Blossom Festival blossoms each year to commemorate the gift of some 3,000 cherry trees from Tokyo to the nation's capital in 1912. While the festival had modest beginnings, the event has since evolved into a springtime celebration that attracts millions of visitors from around the world. "It's truly amazing how a gift from over 100 years ago has now reached so many people," says Diana Mayhew, the festival's president.
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By Dorothy Fleetwood and Dorothy Fleetwood,Contributing Writer | March 28, 1993
The time has come to forget the rigors of winter and enjoy the season at hand, and what better place to do so than the nation's capital during cherry blossom time?The cherry trees were a gift from the mayor of Tokyo. They were presented in 1912 as an expression of friendship between Japan and the United States.The festival opens today with the lighting of a 300-year-old Japanese lantern and a ceremony and concert at 3 p.m. at the Sylvan Theater on Washington Monument grounds. Throughout the afternoon the annual Cherry Blossom Arts Festival will be held along the Southwest waterfront.
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By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | March 21, 2012
The National Cherry Blossom Festival continues through April 27, but peak bloom is expected to run only through Friday. So are you going to brave the crowds for peak bloom or wait a few weeks and risk missing out on some rapture Take my advice and skip it entirely. Here's the thing. Getting there from Baltimore is a huge giant pain in the neck no matter how you slice it. And, when you actually get to the Tidal Basin, you remember, too late, that other people don't know how to walk.
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By LORI SEARS | March 19, 2006
Cherry Blossom Festival While tomorrow marks the first official day of spring, Saturday marks the true start of the season, as the Cherry Blossom Festival begins in Washington. The annual festival, which runs Saturday through April 9, commemorates the gift of 3,000 cherry trees from the people of Tokyo to the people of Washington in 1912. On opening day, visitors can take part in the National Cherry Blossom Festival Family Day and Opening Ceremony at the National Building Museum. Family day will feature various hands-on activities, demonstrations, performances and displays inside the museum's Great Hall.
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March 21, 1996
The Arts of Japan Festival is a prelude to the National Cherry Blossom Festival, a two-week showcase of Japanese culture that honors the continuing friendship between the United States and Japan. The celebration, highlighted by the National Cherry Blossom Festival parade, begins March 31 and concludes on April 14. Here are some festival highlights:Throughout the festivalStamp collectors can add a National Cherry Blossom Festival Postal Cancellation to their collection, from 10 a.m. until 5: 30 p.m. at the National Postal Museum, 2 Massachusetts Ave. NE."
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By KARIN REMESCH | March 27, 1997
Cherry Blossom FestivalCelebrate the blossoming of about 3,700 cherry trees in the nation's capital with the annual Cherry Blossom Festival beginning Sunday and running through April 13. Opening ceremonies with the traditional lantern lighting start at 2 p.m. Sunday on the Washington Monument Grounds. Other events throughout the two-week celebration include concerts, first-day postal cancellation, evening cruises, children's activities, a candlelight tour of Mount Vernon, and a black-tie dinner dance.
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By Jarrett Graver | March 26, 1998
China's ancient cultureImmerse yourself in the magical tradition of Far Eastern culture this Sunday at St. Mary's College of Maryland's daylong celebration of the music, drama and history of China. The day's events begin at 2 p.m. with the Chinese Opera Workshop I, where expert instrumentalists will demonstrate techniques used to accompany Chinese opera; the activities conclude at 8 p.m., with a performance by the Beijing Opera (pictured). St. Mary's College philosophy professor Henry Rosemont will give a lecture titled "The Aesthetic Dimensions of Chinese Thought" at 5 p.m., and the Chinese Opera Workshop II will include demonstrations of the different costumes, acting techniques and props that are used to augment performances of Chinese opera at 3 p.m. The Chinese Day Dinner will be held at 6:30 p.m.St.
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By Karin Remesch | March 22, 2001
Happy birthday, Maryland Celebrate Maryland's 367th birthday Sunday at St. Clement's Island-Potomac River Museum in Coltons Point. Ceremonies begin at 1 p.m. on the museum grounds overlooking St. Clement's Island - the exact spot where the first English colonists landed March 25, 1634. The historical tribute to the birth of Maryland features guest speakers, local choral groups, an excerpt from the theater production "Tide of Tolerance," the St. Maries Citty Militia, a colorful flag ceremony with fourth-grade students from across Maryland carrying county flags and more.
NEWS
By Washington Bureau | March 29, 1992
WASHINGTON -- More than 3,000 cherry trees are poised to blossom in Washington this week, just in time for the annual Cherry Blossom Festival.According to the National Park Service, the pink and white flowers are expected to start opening between Thursday and Saturday.But a weather change could move up -- or push back -- the date the flowers are expected to open so it's hard to make an exact prediction. Earle Kittleman of the National Park Service said the fragile blossoms last less than a week, and he warned that cold weather, high winds or heavy rains can ruin the flowers.
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By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | March 15, 2012
Even as they turn 100, Washington's cherry trees in full bloom remain as wondrously beautiful as ever — which explains why more than a million people are expected to come gaze at them over the next five weeks. D.C.'s annual Cherry Blossom Festival, perhaps the most welcome harbinger of spring anywhere in the U.S., begins Tuesday (the first day of spring) and runs through April 27 (Arbor Day). Expanded from its customary 19 days in celebration of the trees' 100th anniversary, the schedule includes fireworks, a parade, live music, visits from Japanese dignitaries and entertainers, and even a commemorative stamp from the U.S. Postal Service.
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By Michael E. Ruane, The Washington Post | March 18, 2011
The National Cherry Blossom Festival and Sakura Matsuri Japanese street festival, held in conjunction in April, will be much more muted and heartfelt this year because of the disaster in Japan, officials of both events said this week. "We cannot just jump straight into the cherry blossom festival," John R. Malott, president of the Japan-America Society of Washington and a member of the blossom festival board, said this week. "We need to be aware every day of what has happened in Japan.
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By Mary Carole McCauley Mary.McCauley@BaltSun.com | March 24, 2010
Talk about being in the pink. Despite February's record blizzards, the 3,700 cherry trees in Washington's Tidal Basin have been shaped and pruned into tip-top condition. And they're right on schedule to erupt in a froth of cotton-candy-colored petals during the 98th National Cherry Blossom Festival, which begins Saturday. "There was a little bit more damage done to the branches this year because of the seven feet of snow we received this season," says Diana Mayhew, the Festival's president.
NEWS
March 30, 2008
ART ART POWER -- Times vary. Friday through April 6. Art Blooms 2008: All Mapped Out With Flowers at Walters Art Museum, 600 N. Charles St. Free. thewalters.org or 410-547-9000. Check out floral arrangements interpreting artworks at the Wal ters Art Museum at this annual event. About 30 garden clubs have created displays, which will be on view this weekend. Noon-3 p.m. Fri day, noon-4 p.m. Saturday and noon-2 p.m. April 6, docents will lead tours of the exhibit and explain the meanings behind the works that inspired the floral arrangements.
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By JOE BURRIS and JOE BURRIS,SUN REPORTER | March 28, 2006
It's the knowing smile before a lover's embrace. It's the musicians' warm-up notes before an orchestra's performance. This time of year, on the streets of Bethesda's Kenwood neighborhood, most of the pink buds on the cherry trees are still closed. Tree branches from both sides of the streets arch so far, they meet in the middle, but there's no burst of color, no fragrance. Yet. But some people can't wait. Anticipating that the blossoms will be in full bloom by this weekend, they've come out days in advance, beating the throng of cars and the crowds on foot that will soon descend on this ever-less-secret alternative to the more famous cherry trees on Washington's Tidal Basin.
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By SARAH YURGEALITIS and SARAH YURGEALITIS,SUN REPORTER | March 25, 2006
Call it the gesture of friendship that keeps on blooming. It was 94 years ago this spring that the city of Tokyo gave the citizens of Washington the gift of 3,000 cherry trees to be planted along the Tidal Basin. Several years later, a festival was started to commemorate the event. This year's Cherry Blossom Festival begins today and goes through April 9. "It's one of the most exciting spring events in Washington, D.C., and there's truly something for everyone. We work on it all year, and it offers much cultural entertainment," says Diana Mercer, executive director of the festival.
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By SARAH YURGEALITIS and SARAH YURGEALITIS,SUN REPORTER | March 25, 2006
Call it the gesture of friendship that keeps on blooming. It was 94 years ago this spring that the city of Tokyo gave the citizens of Washington the gift of 3,000 cherry trees to be planted along the Tidal Basin. Several years later, a festival was started to commemorate the event. This year's Cherry Blossom Festival begins today and goes through April 9. "It's one of the most exciting spring events in Washington, D.C., and there's truly something for everyone. We work on it all year, and it offers much cultural entertainment," says Diana Mercer, executive director of the festival.
TRAVEL
By LORI SEARS | March 19, 2006
Cherry Blossom Festival While tomorrow marks the first official day of spring, Saturday marks the true start of the season, as the Cherry Blossom Festival begins in Washington. The annual festival, which runs Saturday through April 9, commemorates the gift of 3,000 cherry trees from the people of Tokyo to the people of Washington in 1912. On opening day, visitors can take part in the National Cherry Blossom Festival Family Day and Opening Ceremony at the National Building Museum. Family day will feature various hands-on activities, demonstrations, performances and displays inside the museum's Great Hall.
FEATURES
By KEVIN COWHERD | April 14, 2005
WASHINGTON - This is the story of a recent trip here to look at the famous cherry trees and take in the National Cherry Blossom Festival, which is like Super Bowl Week for cherry-blossom aficionados, only with less partying. As you may or may not know, the festival commemorates the gift of 3,000 cherry trees given by the mayor of Tokyo to the people of Washington in 1912. "Someday," the Japanese mayor predicted in a note accompanying the gift, "hundreds of thousands of people will descend on your fair city to admire these trees, creating horrendous traffic gridlock, vast parking shortages and a litter problem of staggering proportions.
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