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By ROBERT RUBY and ROBERT RUBY,SUN STAFF | March 24, 1996
"Bloomsbury Recalled," by Quentin Bell. Columbia University Press. 234 pages. $24.95. Quentin Bell forgives his elders in this calm, generous memoir for all their painful, intimate flaws as members of the British artistic flowering known as Bloomsbury. He manages to sound always warm and kind even when offering reminders that the Bloomsbury circle of relatives and lovers and friends was as imperfect as it was gifted.The Bloomsbury Age lasted from 1910 to the eve of World War II - that informal, well-to-do collective of artistic and social experiments carried out in London and the Bells' country house and the house of the author's aunt and uncle, Virginia and Leonard Woolf.
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By David Ulin and David Ulin,Los Angeles Times | September 2, 2007
Painting Chinese: A Lifelong Teacher Gains the Wisdom of Youth Herbert Kohl Bloomsbury / 70 pages / $19.95 A couple of years ago, as he approached his 70th birthday, Herbert Kohl decided he needed to do something for himself. The long-time educator and author was struggling to come to terms with aging, as well as with his grief at the collapse after four years of the University of San Francisco's Center for Teaching Excellence and Social Justice, a program he founded that had "ended bitterly," cut by the university after the funds Kohl had raised ran out. For Kohl, the key to dealing with these traumas was to reopen himself to learning and develop a new skill.
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NEWS
By Mary Maushard and Mary Maushard,SUN STAFF | December 19, 1995
Catonsville residents -- by a margin of more than 2-1 -- spoke out last night against a new elementary school planned near the present Catonsville Middle School.Although they conceded the need for more elementary seats, the schools' opponents held firm to their plan to renovate the former middle school on Bloomsbury Avenue and return the present middle school to an elementary.More than 150 people attended the long-sought public hearing before the school board and interim Superintendent Anthony G. Marchione.
NEWS
By Ursula K. Le Guin and Ursula K. Le Guin,Los Angeles Times | October 22, 2006
The Ladies of Grace Adieu and Other Stories By Susanna Clarke Bloomsbury / 242 pages / $23.95 Susanna Clarke keeps her immensely lively imagination on a tight rein. This hyper-control may be the key to her popular success, for it allows her always to share a wink or a shrug with the reader - as if to say, "We really needn't take this seriously, you know." Like her novel Jonathan Strange & Mr. Norrell, this new volume of tales is resolutely sophisticated. The charm of distance is provided by the formality of the manner and language, frequently a pastiche of Jane Austen and her contemporaries, complete with spellings such as "scizzars" and "cloaths."
NEWS
By Amanda J. Crawford and Amanda J. Crawford,SUN STAFF | July 28, 2003
Delayed by disputes over storage sheds, unpaid fees and other unresolved issues, the move of public housing residents into the state-built, waterfront New Bloomsbury Square community in Annapolis is still weeks away. Officials at the Annapolis Housing Authority, the state Department of General Services and the city will come together today in a meeting organized by House Speaker Michael E. Busch in hopes of smoothing out the remaining wrinkles in the project. The residents must be moved in order for the state to demolish the old Bloomsbury housing to make way for the $26 million expansion of the Lowe House Office building.
NEWS
By Lisa Respers and Lisa Respers,SUN STAFF | December 22, 1995
The Baltimore County school board voted unanimously last night to build an elementary school next to the current Catonsville Middle School.In approving the new 500-seat Southwest Elementary School project, to be built on a 12-acre site adjoining the middle school on Edmondson Avenue, the board rejected the wishes of the Catonsville Community Conservation Association (CCCA), a citizens group that wants to restore the former Catonsville Middle School on Bloomsbury Avenue and convert the current middle school to an elementary.
NEWS
By Lisa Respers and Lisa Respers,SUN STAFF | January 15, 1996
Landmark preservation status is the latest tool being used by the Catonsville Community Conservation Association in its fight to restore the former Catonsville Middle School on Bloomsbury Avenue.The Baltimore County Landmarks Preservation Commission recently voted unanimously to add the 70-year-old building to its landmarks list. The vote serves as a recommendation for preservation status to the County Council, which makes the final decision.Jim Himel, CCCA vice president, said the group hopes to safeguard the Bloomsbury building while efforts continue to convert it back to a middle school.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | January 10, 1998
With the General Assembly session due to start Wednesday, Baltimore County already has achieved one of its legislative goals for this year: state money for the proposed Bloomsbury Community Center in Catonsville.Gov. Parris N. Glendening announced during a Catonsville Chamber of Commerce luncheon at the Knights of Columbus hall yesterday that he will include $1.5 million in his capital budget for renovation of the former Catonsville Middle School on Bloomsbury Avenue this year.He also toured Catonsville's Frederick Road business district to see where a $2.1 million street beautification project is to begin in March.
NEWS
By Lisa Respers and Lisa Respers,SUN STAFF | December 18, 1995
It would seem their battle to save an old neighborhood landmark has been won, but members of a community organization who successfully fought the demolition of the former Catonsville Middle School on Bloomsbury Avenue say the war is far from over.They want the building restored and reopened as a middle school -- an idea that runs counter to the school system's plans.The next skirmish will come at 7 o'clock tonight at the current Catonsville Middle School, 2301 Edmondson Ave. A public hearing will allow community comment on a proposed site for the Southwest Area Elementary School.
NEWS
By Lisa Respers and Lisa Respers,SUN STAFF | December 6, 1995
Baltimore County is considering forgoing the demolition of a popular, 70-year-old school in Catonsville in favor of another site for a planned new elementary school, officials announced at a school board meeting last night.Board President Calvin Disney called for a public meeting Dec. 18 at a location to be determined to discuss constructing the new Southwest Area Elementary on about 12 acres next to the current Catonsville Middle School on Edmondson Avenue.The new site would spare the former Catonsville Middle School on Bloomsbury Avenue, which was earlier targeted to be demolished to make room for the 500-seat elementary school.
NEWS
By JAMIE STIEHM and JAMIE STIEHM,SUN REPORTER | February 15, 2006
At the gateway to Annapolis stands a 51-unit public housing community widely considered a design success story. Architectural grace notes at Bloomsbury Square include a curving foot path cut in the grass, bright shutters, granite curbs and pillars on small porches of the two-story brick townhouses with cathedral ceilings, hardwood floors. A scenic waterway and the absence of unsightly fences also foster a sense of neighborhood cohesion. But inside the attractive $8.4 million community, some residents say, there's day-to-day discontent at the state of repair at Bloomsbury Square, which recently passed its second birthday by the banks of College Creek, and at the state construction project taking place across the street.
NEWS
By Molly Knight and Molly Knight,SUN STAFF | November 16, 2004
Longtime residents of Bloomsbury Square, the Annapolis public housing development, remember Elsie Virginia Clark as much more than a cheerful, caring neighbor. Those who knew Clark - who died Nov. 6 at age 102 - said she was a fighter, one who successfully saved their homes from being demolished years ago. To honor her, residents of Bloomsbury Square - recently rebuilt as a cluster of brick townhomes on College Creek off Rowe Boulevard - said they plan to put up a neighborhood plaque in her honor.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | June 4, 2004
The champion of the new Bloomsbury Square public housing complex in Annapolis is a small woman with a big voice. When critics said the $6.5 million waterfront project was too nice for poor people, Janet E. LaBella reassured her clients that their promised new homes would not be taken away. When move-in was delayed repeatedly, she offered encouragement. Throughout, she fought for them. But today, after spending hundreds of hours ensuring that the 51-unit complex would became a reality, LaBella leaves her post at the helm of the Anne Arundel County office of the Maryland Legal Aid Bureau.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | June 4, 2004
The champion of the new Bloomsbury Square public housing complex in Annapolis is a small woman with a big voice. When critics blasted the $6.5 million waterfront project as too nice for poor people, Janet E. LaBella reassured her clients that their promised new homes would not be taken away. When move-in was delayed repeatedly for a variety of reasons, she offered encouragement. Throughout, she fought for them. But today, after spending hundreds of hours ensuring that the 51-unit complex would became a reality, LaBella leaves her post at the helm of the Anne Arundel County office of the Maryland Legal Aid Bureau.
NEWS
By Jason Song and Jason Song,SUN STAFF | March 28, 2004
The new Bloomsbury Square - the controversial and long-delayed Annapolis public housing complex - was once labeled a model of "what not to do" by Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr., a "tragedy" by Comptroller William Donald Schaefer and "more trouble than it's worth" by one of its residents. So when officials with the city's housing authority found out that the 51-unit complex on the banks of College Creek doesn't actually lie on the historic Bloomsbury Square property, the agency was quick to begin a search for a new name.
NEWS
February 16, 2004
Frances Partridge, 103, the last of the spectacularly talented and irreverent group of British writers and artists who coalesced as the Bloomsbury group in the years before World War I, died Feb. 5 in London. Her death was announced by her literary agency, Rogers, Coleridge & White Ltd., which said she died in her apartment. She was surrounded there by remnants of the Bloomsbury groups heyday, including their books, one of them the letters of her friend Virginia Woolf, and their art, including the painter Dora Carringtons famous portrait of Lytton Strachey.
NEWS
By Joan Jacobson and Joan Jacobson,SUN STAFF | March 8, 2001
The long-abandoned middle school on Bloomsbury Avenue might just be the most controversial building in Catonsville. Six years ago, a long debate centered over whether the building should be recycled as a middle school. That was followed by an unsuccessful fight by preservationists to save the building's wings. Now, the original 76-year-old structure in the 100 block of Bloomsbury Ave. is being renovated to become Baltimore County's largest community recreation center, Bloomsbury Community Center.
NEWS
By Jason Song and Jason Song,SUN STAFF | January 15, 2004
The board of Annapolis' housing authority yesterday fired Clyde Caldwell, the acting executive director, over differences in management and communication style. Caldwell had served as the authority's top manager since last spring, when he took over for P. Holden Croslan, whose five years was marked by improved finances but clashes with city officials and some residents. She left in what was described as a mutual parting of ways and was to receive a year's salary as severance. Trudy McFall, the board's chairwoman, attributed yesterday's move involving Caldwell to tensions between him and board members.
NEWS
By Jason Song and Jason Song,SUN STAFF | November 4, 2003
Keyanna Singleton spent most of yesterday morning shyly gripping her mother's leg as movers unloaded box after box into her family's townhouse in the new Bloomsbury Square housing community in downtown Annapolis. But then she loosened her grip and ran toward one of the gleaming white columns near her new front door and wrapped her arms around it as far as they would go. "I love this house," proclaimed the 4-year-old girl, whose family had been waiting for almost nine months to move into their new home overlooking College Creek.
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