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By Chicago Tribune | November 1, 1992
BLOOMINGTON, Minn. -- The Mall of America is in Bloomington, Minn., a few yards off Interstate Highway 494, about five minutes west of the Minneapolis-St. Paul International Airport.Mall admission is free. So is parking. Stores are open from 10 a.m. to 9:30 p.m. Mondays through Saturdays and 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. Sundays (closed Christmas and New Year's Day). The 23 rides in Knott's Camp Snoopy cost $1 to $2.50 and are open the same hours weekdays and Sundays, and until 11 p.m. onSaturdays. Movie theaters and entertainment areas run past midnight.
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NEWS
November 4, 2003
Frank McCloskey, 64, an outspoken champion of Bosnia during his 12 years in Congress, died Sunday in Bloomington, Ind., of bladder cancer. He represented southwestern Indiana's 8th District in the House from 1983 to 1995. Mr. McCloskey made several trips to Bosnia during his years in Congress, and called in 1992 for selective air strikes against Serb forces if they continued their siege of Bosnia-Herzegovina. He later criticized the Clinton administration's handling of the Bosnian conflict and called for the resignation of then-Secretary of State Warren Christopher, warning that Serbs were committing genocide in Bosnia.
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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 21, 1996
BLOOMINGTON, Ill. -- In this small city rising out of the cornfields, two new attractions have opened on Main Street in the past year or so: a nightclub and a bookstore, both catering to lesbians and gay men.A decade ago, there was almost no visible gay presence in Bloomington, a city of about 55,000. But a meeting in November for homosexuals interested in starting an advocacy group drew more than 150 people.And a proposal to ban discrimination against homosexuals, accompanied by the familiar backlash, goes before the City Council for a vote tomorrow.
NEWS
May 8, 2003
Philip L. King, an optician and former owner of Bowen & King Inc., died of congestive heart failure Saturday at the health facility of Meadowood Retirement Community in Bloomington, Ind. He was 90. Mr. King was born in Baltimore and, after the death of his parents, was raised by relatives in Pennsylvania and New Jersey. He returned to the city and graduated from McDonogh School in 1932. In the early 1930s, Mr. King joined the family business that had been established by an uncle in 1900 and was located at 405 N. Charles St. Mr. King, an early contact lens specialist in Baltimore, in the early 1960s purchased what became a small chain of optical stores.
NEWS
May 8, 2003
Philip L. King, an optician and former owner of Bowen & King Inc., died of congestive heart failure Saturday at the health facility of Meadowood Retirement Community in Bloomington, Ind. He was 90. Mr. King was born in Baltimore and, after the death of his parents, was raised by relatives in Pennsylvania and New Jersey. He returned to the city and graduated from McDonogh School in 1932. In the early 1930s, Mr. King joined the family business that had been established by an uncle in 1900 and was located at 405 N. Charles St. Mr. King, an early contact lens specialist in Baltimore, in the early 1960s purchased what became a small chain of optical stores.
NEWS
November 4, 2003
Frank McCloskey, 64, an outspoken champion of Bosnia during his 12 years in Congress, died Sunday in Bloomington, Ind., of bladder cancer. He represented southwestern Indiana's 8th District in the House from 1983 to 1995. Mr. McCloskey made several trips to Bosnia during his years in Congress, and called in 1992 for selective air strikes against Serb forces if they continued their siege of Bosnia-Herzegovina. He later criticized the Clinton administration's handling of the Bosnian conflict and called for the resignation of then-Secretary of State Warren Christopher, warning that Serbs were committing genocide in Bosnia.
NEWS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | September 11, 2000
In the end, the zero-tolerance policy Indiana University placed on basketball coach Bob Knight to stop his confrontational behavior had zero impact. Knight, 59, was fired yesterday by university President Myles Brand, ending Knight's controversial 29-year career in Bloomington, Ind., which included winning three national championships. The decision came less than a week after Knight made "inappropriate physical contact" with an Indiana freshman. Knight allegedly grabbed Kent Harvey outside Assembly Hall on campus after Harvey had called Knight by his last name.
SPORTS
By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,Sun Staff Correspondent | July 28, 1991
BLOOMINGTON -- At the base of the massive dam that backs the North Branch of the Potomac River into 1,000-acre Jennings-Randolph Reservoir, an outdoor laboratory a half acre in size may lead to the accelerated rebirth of 35 miles of waterway that had been virtually dead for 100 years.That a waterway may be cleansed and reborn is not unusual -- but the manner in which the North Branch above this Garrett County town is being repopulated with brown trout is. In fact, the men who run the project say that it is unique in the United States and perhaps the world.
NEWS
By Donald Woutat and Donald Woutat,Los Angeles Times | July 28, 1992
BLOOMINGTON, Minn. -- Connie and Bill Barnes and their two teen-age "I love to shop" daughters will pile into the family car next month for the 10-hour trek here from their home in Topeka, Kan., to buy school clothes.In northeastern Montana, farmers Elizabeth and Carl Sauskojus, who have to drive 60 miles just to get groceries, are laying plans for a 700-mile pilgrimage to Bloomington to explore the exotic new department stores.From across Japan, 60 tour groups have already booked rooms for this year in Bloomington, a serendipitous stopover on Northwest Airlines' popular Tokyo-to-Disney World flight.
NEWS
By HOWARD LIBIT and HOWARD LIBIT,SUN STAFF | February 6, 2000
BLOOMINGTON -- This town knows death -- usually by trucks. Proof is found in 18 faded white crosses at the foot of Cemetery Hill, each marking the fatal crash of a truck whose brakes failed. But today, this tight-knit community on the border of Garrett and Allegany counties and West Virginia is burying Eddie Lee Rogers, a 15-year-old who died in an unexpected way last Sunday, when an out-of-control coal train smashed through his house just yards away from the tracks. "No one ever dreamed that the train would run off the track," says Alice Howard, Bloomington's historian and one of its oldest residents.
NEWS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | September 11, 2000
In the end, the zero-tolerance policy Indiana University placed on basketball coach Bob Knight to stop his confrontational behavior had zero impact. Knight, 59, was fired yesterday by university President Myles Brand, ending Knight's controversial 29-year career in Bloomington, Ind., which included winning three national championships. The decision came less than a week after Knight made "inappropriate physical contact" with an Indiana freshman. Knight allegedly grabbed Kent Harvey outside Assembly Hall on campus after Harvey had called Knight by his last name.
NEWS
By Howard Libit and Howard Libit,SUN STAFF | February 6, 2000
BLOOMINGTON -- This town knows death -- usually by trucks. Proof is found in 18 faded white crosses at the foot of Cemetery Hill, each marking the fatal crash of a truck whose brakes failed. But today, this tight-knit community on the border of Garrett and Allegany counties and West Virginia is burying Eddie Lee Rogers, a 15-year-old who died in an unexpected way last Sunday when an out-of-control coal train smashed through his house just yards away from the tracks. "No one ever dreamed that the train would run off the track," says Alice Howard, Bloomington's historian and one of its oldest residents.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 21, 1996
BLOOMINGTON, Ill. -- In this small city rising out of the cornfields, two new attractions have opened on Main Street in the past year or so: a nightclub and a bookstore, both catering to lesbians and gay men.A decade ago, there was almost no visible gay presence in Bloomington, a city of about 55,000. But a meeting in November for homosexuals interested in starting an advocacy group drew more than 150 people.And a proposal to ban discrimination against homosexuals, accompanied by the familiar backlash, goes before the City Council for a vote tomorrow.
FEATURES
By Chicago Tribune | November 1, 1992
BLOOMINGTON, Minn. -- The Mall of America is in Bloomington, Minn., a few yards off Interstate Highway 494, about five minutes west of the Minneapolis-St. Paul International Airport.Mall admission is free. So is parking. Stores are open from 10 a.m. to 9:30 p.m. Mondays through Saturdays and 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. Sundays (closed Christmas and New Year's Day). The 23 rides in Knott's Camp Snoopy cost $1 to $2.50 and are open the same hours weekdays and Sundays, and until 11 p.m. onSaturdays. Movie theaters and entertainment areas run past midnight.
NEWS
By Donald Woutat and Donald Woutat,Los Angeles Times | July 28, 1992
BLOOMINGTON, Minn. -- Connie and Bill Barnes and their two teen-age "I love to shop" daughters will pile into the family car next month for the 10-hour trek here from their home in Topeka, Kan., to buy school clothes.In northeastern Montana, farmers Elizabeth and Carl Sauskojus, who have to drive 60 miles just to get groceries, are laying plans for a 700-mile pilgrimage to Bloomington to explore the exotic new department stores.From across Japan, 60 tour groups have already booked rooms for this year in Bloomington, a serendipitous stopover on Northwest Airlines' popular Tokyo-to-Disney World flight.
NEWS
By Chicago Tribune | January 22, 1992
Is bigger better?The developers of Mall of America hope so.Now under construction in Bloomington, Minn., a suburb of the Twin Cities of Minneapolis and St. Paul, the megamall is not only big, it will be the biggest shopping center in the nation when it opens this summer.This Paul Bunyan of shopping centers is a giant in every way. Being built on the 78-acre site of the former Metropolitan Stadium, where the baseball Twins and National Football League Vikings played before the Metrodome was built, it has a floor area of 4.2 million square feet, about the same as in the Sears Tower in Chicago.
NEWS
By Chicago Tribune | January 22, 1992
Is bigger better?The developers of Mall of America hope so.Now under construction in Bloomington, Minn., a suburb of the Twin Cities of Minneapolis and St. Paul, the megamall is not only big, it will be the biggest shopping center in the nation when it opens this summer.This Paul Bunyan of shopping centers is a giant in every way. Being built on the 78-acre site of the former Metropolitan Stadium, where the baseball Twins and National Football League Vikings played before the Metrodome was built, it has a floor area of 4.2 million square feet, about the same as in the Sears Tower in Chicago.
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