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BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | June 13, 1996
BLOOMFIELD HILLS, Mich. -- There was no shelter from this storm.Shortly after noon yesterday, what was supposed to be a thundershower rolled past Oakland Hills Country Club. Two torrential hours and more than two inches of rain later, the start of the U.S. Open seemed in doubt, but some late afternoon sunshine and quick work by the grounds crew meant that play was supposed to start on schedule today, at 7 a.m.Unless more rains came.Yesterday's storm wreaked havoc on every structure that wasn't permanent.
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FEATURES
By Samantha Iacia, For The Baltimore Sun | May 28, 2014
Date: March 29 Her story: Annabelle Alberts, 30, grew up in Detroit. She lived in New York City for 31/2 years before moving to Maryland in September 2012. She is the manager of marketing for Deloitte Forensic in Baltimore. Her parents, Marcia and Mike Alberts, live in Bloomfield Hills, Mich. His story: Scott Palagyi, 31, was born in Pittsburgh but grew up in York, Pa. He spent seven years working in Ohio for Procter & Gamble before being relocated to Baltimore about three years ago. He is the northeast distributions center operations leader for Procter & Gamble in Hunt Valley.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, Baltimore Sun | August 12, 2010
Rob Mies wants to tackle the image problem bats have head-on. No, they're not going to land on your head and mess up your hair something fierce. No, they're not going to suck your blood and turn into Robert Pattinson (or Bela Lugosi). And yes, they do an awful lot of good. For one thing, they make margaritas possible. "I try to find things that I feel people will be wowed by, that if bats didn't exist, their life would actually change," says Mies, who will be talking about all things bat (and showing off a few of the critters)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, Baltimore Sun | August 12, 2010
Rob Mies wants to tackle the image problem bats have head-on. No, they're not going to land on your head and mess up your hair something fierce. No, they're not going to suck your blood and turn into Robert Pattinson (or Bela Lugosi). And yes, they do an awful lot of good. For one thing, they make margaritas possible. "I try to find things that I feel people will be wowed by, that if bats didn't exist, their life would actually change," says Mies, who will be talking about all things bat (and showing off a few of the critters)
FEATURES
By Samantha Iacia, For The Baltimore Sun | May 28, 2014
Date: March 29 Her story: Annabelle Alberts, 30, grew up in Detroit. She lived in New York City for 31/2 years before moving to Maryland in September 2012. She is the manager of marketing for Deloitte Forensic in Baltimore. Her parents, Marcia and Mike Alberts, live in Bloomfield Hills, Mich. His story: Scott Palagyi, 31, was born in Pittsburgh but grew up in York, Pa. He spent seven years working in Ohio for Procter & Gamble before being relocated to Baltimore about three years ago. He is the northeast distributions center operations leader for Procter & Gamble in Hunt Valley.
NEWS
September 22, 1999
Arnold Feuerman,81, an inventor and former chairman of Arnold Automotive Group, one of the nation's largest auto dealers, died Friday in Bloomfield Hills, Mich., of liver cancer.Willi Millowitsch,90, one of Germany's best-known comic actors and a fixture at the Cologne carnival, died Monday in Cologne.Fred Roti,78, a former Chicago alderman who was convicted of political corruption, died of lung cancer Monday in Chicago.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,Sun Staff Writer | February 8, 1995
On a spring day in 1878, a young Naval Academy physics instructor took his students from the confines of the lecture hall and assembled them along the banks of the Severn River. He began to set up an experiment for measuring the speed of light.But what Albert A. Michelson, then 26, achieved was nothing short of revolutionary. He set a measurement that would stand for 45 years and began work that would lead to Albert Einstein's theory of relativity.Michelson, who had graduated from the academy only five years earlier, set up a revolving mirror at one end of the sea wall and a stationary mirror 500 feet away, along with a heliostat, a lens and a tuning fork.
NEWS
March 22, 2005
Mary Lou DeNike, a Timonium homemaker, died of cancer Friday at St. Joseph Medical Center. She was 77. Born Mary Lou McGrane in Chicago, she was raised in Grosse Pointe, Mich. She earned an associate's degree in vocal music in 1947 from Stephens College in Columbia, Mo. After her marriage to Robert E. DeNike, the couple lived for a decade in Grosse Pointe and then in Camillus, N.Y., where she became active in amateur theater. She wrote and directed a dozen original musical productions that raised more the $25,000 for the local Optimist Club's youth programs.
BUSINESS
By Bob Erle | September 19, 2004
Grayson Homes recently was named a 2005 National Housing Quality Award winner by the National Association of Home Builders Research Center in Upper Marlboro. The Ellicott City homebuilder was one of two applicants to receive a gold award for quality achievement in the residential construction industry. The other winner was Pulte Homes of Bloomfield Hills, Mich. Grayson, which had applied for the award the past four years, previously won a silver award and an honorable mention. "It's been four years of hard work on all the employees' parts," said Cindy McAuliffe, Grayson's president.
NEWS
November 24, 1990
A Mass of Christian burial for John P. Stavar, retired district sales manager for a welding equipment manufacturer, will be offered at 10 a.m. Monday at Immaculate Conception Roman Catholic Church in Towson.Mr. Stavar, who was 73 and lived in Towson, died Wednesday at St. Joseph Hospital of a respiratory illness.He retired about 10 years ago from the Dockson Corp. of Detroit. Other companies he worked for since coming to the Baltimore area in 1941 included the Morris Wheeler Steel Co. of Philadelphia.
SPORTS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | June 13, 1996
BLOOMFIELD HILLS, Mich. -- There was no shelter from this storm.Shortly after noon yesterday, what was supposed to be a thundershower rolled past Oakland Hills Country Club. Two torrential hours and more than two inches of rain later, the start of the U.S. Open seemed in doubt, but some late afternoon sunshine and quick work by the grounds crew meant that play was supposed to start on schedule today, at 7 a.m.Unless more rains came.Yesterday's storm wreaked havoc on every structure that wasn't permanent.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | June 15, 1999
BLOOMFIELD HILLS, Mich. -- Exide Corp., the world's largest maker of automobile batteries, plans to sell several units as part of a plan by its new chief executive, Robert Lutz, to pay off debt and shed less-profitable businesses.Exide has put "several noncore assets" up for sale, spokesman Bruce Boyle said yesterday.Boyle declined to comment on an Automotive News report that the company would sell its Speed Clip battery-terminal supplier, its battery-charger business, its Sure Start alternator and starter restorer unit, its maker of plastic battery casings and its insulator-manufacturing division.
NEWS
May 3, 2003
Harvey Kresge Jr., 87, a relative of the founder of the company that became Kmart Corp., died April 26 of pneumonia in Bloomfield Hills, Mich. He started his career working at the dime store chain founded by his father's cousin, S.S. Kresge, helping the chain grow into one of the world's largest retail companies. In 1951, he moved up to operations manager and later was promoted to district manager, in charge of all Kmart stores in Michigan, Ohio and Indiana. Muriel Topaz, 70, a former director of the Dance Notation Bureau and the dance division of the Juilliard School, died Monday of liver disease in Branford, Conn.
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