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Bloodsworth Island

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NEWS
By Tom Horton and Tom Horton,SUN STAFF | April 25, 1997
FROM ABERDEEN Proving Ground to the Atlantic Fleet's home port in Norfolk, the Chesapeake is very much a military bay.All told, the Army, Navy, Air Force and Marines occupy 66 installations in the bay's watershed, covering about 550 square miles.Anyone who has boated long in these waters will have witnessed jets strafing target ships off Tangier Island; naval destroyers shelling midbay marsh islands, and the periodic closures of waters around Aberdeen and Dahlgren on the Potomac, when the big guns are booming.
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NEWS
March 20, 2005
GOOD NEWS for the flora and fauna of Bloodsworth Island - not to mention the local watermen and nearby residents of Dorchester County. The U.S. Navy isn't going to bomb you, or shoot machine guns at you, or otherwise raise a ruckus. Navy officials have reassured members of Maryland's congressional delegation that all will be quiet on the Eastern Shore front. The 6,013-acre longtime naval testing range will see some flyovers and radar tests but no "Guadalcanal operation," as Sen. Barbara A. Mikulski described the threatened exercises.
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NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SUN STAFF | March 5, 2005
OFF THE COAST OF BLOODSWORTH ISLAND -- Harold Robinson was crabbing these waters of the Chesapeake Bay about 10 years ago when his fishing boat slammed into something underwater, gouging its keel, hurling his son to the deck with bruised ribs and burying Robinson under an avalanche of crab pots. The 46-foot Chris-Lin had not run aground on rocks or a reef but on another obstacle watermen in this remote section of Maryland's Eastern Shore sometimes face -- the turret of a submerged tank the Navy had been using for target practice.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SUN STAFF | March 17, 2005
Under fire from Sen. Barbara A. Mikulski and others, the Navy backed away yesterday from a proposal to resume bombing, strafing and live-fire military exercises on an island in the Chesapeake Bay. During a Senate subcommittee hearing on the Navy's budget yesterday, Mikulski told Navy Secretary Gordon England that the residents of Maryland's Eastern Shore were agitated about the proposal, first reported March 4 in The Sun. "Remember, they fought off...
NEWS
March 20, 2005
GOOD NEWS for the flora and fauna of Bloodsworth Island - not to mention the local watermen and nearby residents of Dorchester County. The U.S. Navy isn't going to bomb you, or shoot machine guns at you, or otherwise raise a ruckus. Navy officials have reassured members of Maryland's congressional delegation that all will be quiet on the Eastern Shore front. The 6,013-acre longtime naval testing range will see some flyovers and radar tests but no "Guadalcanal operation," as Sen. Barbara A. Mikulski described the threatened exercises.
NEWS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,SUN STAFF | March 15, 2005
U.S. Sen. Paul S. Sarbanes urged the Navy yesterday to complete a full environmental study before it resumes bombing practice on Bloodsworth Island in the Chesapeake Bay. Sarbanes is concerned that the Navy, which stopped bombing and strafing runs on the island near Tangier Sound nine years ago, is not looking hard enough at alternatives to resuming live-fire training exercises and hasn't given the public enough notice. A full environmental impact study could take more than a year and would delve into all possible alternatives, as well as give the public more of a role in the decision.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SUN STAFF | March 4, 2005
The Navy is proposing to resume bombing and strafing runs and live-fire military training exercises on islands in the Chesapeake Bay after a nine-year period of relative peace for the ducks, herons and diamondback terrapins that are now their only inhabitants. Officials with the Naval Air Systems Command in Patuxent River said that expanded, year-round, day-and-night military exercises on Bloodsworth Island and three tiny islands near Tangier Sound are necessary because the nation is at war. "Recent international events have shown that maintaining national security and global stability requires U.S. military forces to be ready for ... threats and challenges," the Navy wrote in a draft environmental assessment mailed in the past few days to officials on the Eastern Shore, watermen, local citizens and others with a stake in the area.
NEWS
By Peter A. Jay | June 8, 1997
HAVRE DE GRACE -- Most of my greenish friends are shocked and outraged at the Navy's intentions to use Bloodsworth Island, a 6,000-acre marshy archipelago in the Chesapeake Bay south of Hooper Straits, to train SEAL teams.The greens, including both a small number who know Bloodsworth well and a much larger number who have never seen it and would be distinctly unhappy if marooned there in mosquito season, are pulling out all the weapons they can find to block the plan. These range from old political IOUs to great blue herons, from '60s-style anti-militarism to baby peregrine falcons.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SUN STAFF | March 17, 2005
Under fire from Sen. Barbara A. Mikulski and others, the Navy backed away yesterday from a proposal to resume bombing, strafing and live-fire military exercises on an island in the Chesapeake Bay. During a Senate subcommittee hearing on the Navy's budget yesterday, Mikulski told Navy Secretary Gordon England that the residents of Maryland's Eastern Shore were agitated about the proposal, first reported March 4 in The Sun. "Remember, they fought off...
NEWS
By TOM HORTON | November 28, 1992
Early maps and accounts of the Chesapeake indicate tha American Indians had set aside lands for tribal combat -- a sort of war zone -- off limits to normal settlement and commerce.Ironically, these areas were abundant in wildlife, which was scarce near Indian villages even in the time of Capt. John Smith and other early European explorers.And the delicious irony has, if anything, enlarged with modern times and weaponry; war zones still are good for wildlife.Around the bay, jet fighters and nesting great blue herons coexist nicely on Bloodsworth Island, the Navy's bombing range in Tangier Sound.
NEWS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,SUN STAFF | March 15, 2005
U.S. Sen. Paul S. Sarbanes urged the Navy yesterday to complete a full environmental study before it resumes bombing practice on Bloodsworth Island in the Chesapeake Bay. Sarbanes is concerned that the Navy, which stopped bombing and strafing runs on the island near Tangier Sound nine years ago, is not looking hard enough at alternatives to resuming live-fire training exercises and hasn't given the public enough notice. A full environmental impact study could take more than a year and would delve into all possible alternatives, as well as give the public more of a role in the decision.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SUN STAFF | March 5, 2005
OFF THE COAST OF BLOODSWORTH ISLAND -- Harold Robinson was crabbing these waters of the Chesapeake Bay about 10 years ago when his fishing boat slammed into something underwater, gouging its keel, hurling his son to the deck with bruised ribs and burying Robinson under an avalanche of crab pots. The 46-foot Chris-Lin had not run aground on rocks or a reef but on another obstacle watermen in this remote section of Maryland's Eastern Shore sometimes face -- the turret of a submerged tank the Navy had been using for target practice.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SUN STAFF | March 4, 2005
The Navy is proposing to resume bombing and strafing runs and live-fire military training exercises on islands in the Chesapeake Bay after a nine-year period of relative peace for the ducks, herons and diamondback terrapins that are now their only inhabitants. Officials with the Naval Air Systems Command in Patuxent River said that expanded, year-round, day-and-night military exercises on Bloodsworth Island and three tiny islands near Tangier Sound are necessary because the nation is at war. "Recent international events have shown that maintaining national security and global stability requires U.S. military forces to be ready for ... threats and challenges," the Navy wrote in a draft environmental assessment mailed in the past few days to officials on the Eastern Shore, watermen, local citizens and others with a stake in the area.
NEWS
By Peter A. Jay | June 8, 1997
HAVRE DE GRACE -- Most of my greenish friends are shocked and outraged at the Navy's intentions to use Bloodsworth Island, a 6,000-acre marshy archipelago in the Chesapeake Bay south of Hooper Straits, to train SEAL teams.The greens, including both a small number who know Bloodsworth well and a much larger number who have never seen it and would be distinctly unhappy if marooned there in mosquito season, are pulling out all the weapons they can find to block the plan. These range from old political IOUs to great blue herons, from '60s-style anti-militarism to baby peregrine falcons.
NEWS
By Tom Horton and Tom Horton,SUN STAFF | April 25, 1997
FROM ABERDEEN Proving Ground to the Atlantic Fleet's home port in Norfolk, the Chesapeake is very much a military bay.All told, the Army, Navy, Air Force and Marines occupy 66 installations in the bay's watershed, covering about 550 square miles.Anyone who has boated long in these waters will have witnessed jets strafing target ships off Tangier Island; naval destroyers shelling midbay marsh islands, and the periodic closures of waters around Aberdeen and Dahlgren on the Potomac, when the big guns are booming.
NEWS
By TOM HORTON | November 28, 1992
Early maps and accounts of the Chesapeake indicate tha American Indians had set aside lands for tribal combat -- a sort of war zone -- off limits to normal settlement and commerce.Ironically, these areas were abundant in wildlife, which was scarce near Indian villages even in the time of Capt. John Smith and other early European explorers.And the delicious irony has, if anything, enlarged with modern times and weaponry; war zones still are good for wildlife.Around the bay, jet fighters and nesting great blue herons coexist nicely on Bloodsworth Island, the Navy's bombing range in Tangier Sound.
NEWS
By Joel McCord ((TC and Joel McCord ((TC,Staff Writer | April 30, 1992
A Navy anti-submarine plane crashed in flames in Tangier Sound yesterday, injuring two crew members who parachuted into the water as their craft was going down.The two were fished out of about 8 feet of water just east of Bloodsworth Island by Maryland Department of Natural Resources police who were on routine patrol in the area about 3:30 p.m., according to Rob Gould, a DNR spokesman.The pilot of the S-3 Viking, Cmdr. Sean Brennan, suffered burns and a broken right shoulder and was flown to the Francis Scott Key Medical Center burn unit, the Navy said.
NEWS
By Joel McCord and Joel McCord,Staff Writer | April 30, 1992
A Navy anti-submarine plane crashed in flames in Tangier Sound yesterday, injuring two crew members who parachuted into the water as their craft was going down.The two were fished out of about 8 feet of water just east of Bloodsworth Island by Department of Natural Resources police who were on routine patrol in the area about 3:30 p.m., according to Rob Gould, a DNR spokesman.The pilot, Lt. Cmdr. Sean Brennan, suffered burns and a broken right shoulder and was flown to the Francis Scott Key Medical Center burn unit, the Navy said.
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