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By Stephanie Hanes and Stephanie Hanes,SUN STAFF | May 21, 2004
Nearly 20 years after a little girl's beaten body was found in a wooded area of Rosedale, and 19 years after an innocent man was sentenced to death for that killing, the Dawn Hamilton murder case ended yesterday when her true killer pleaded guilty in a Baltimore County courtroom. Kimberly Shay Ruffner, a former East Baltimore man with a history of sexual attacks, acknowledged that he alone had sexually assaulted and murdered the 9-year-old girl in 1984. He was sentenced to life in prison; he is already serving time for an unrelated assault.
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SPORTS
By Sandra McKee, The Baltimore Sun | June 17, 2011
After 29 years coaching field hockey and teaching physical education at Roland Park Country School, Debbie Bloodsworth is saying goodbye. "I won't be returning to Roland Park," Bloodsworth said. "It's time for me to make a change. I've been coaching for a long time. I may move from the area. In fact, I'm thinking seriously about that. My mother is 80 and lives in Princes Anne, in Summerset County, about three hours from here. I'm thinking about moving there and reconnecting with some of my family.
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NEWS
December 2, 2004
On Tuesday, November 30, 2004, JAMES A. BLOODSWORTH of Glen Burnie, loving husband of Lois Bloodsworth; cherished father of Darrell Bloodsworth, Heidi Bloodsworth and Rose Flynn; devoted grandfather to Sheila Flynn. The family will receive visitors at the family owned Singleton Funeral Home, 1 Second Ave, S.W., (at Crain Hwy) Glen Burnie from 2 to 4 and 6 to 8 P.M. on Thursday. The Funeral Ceremony will be held at 8 P.M. on Thursday in the Funeral Home Chapel.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | July 7, 2010
Days after the Baltimore Police Department announced that he would oversee reforms in the beleaguered sex offense unit, a popular district commander has opted to retire. Maj. Scott Bloodsworth had been in charge of the Southern District since 2008. His new appointment last week came amid questions about police handling of sex crimes and after city officials vowed to change the way the department investigates them. The new post included the citywide robbery, check and fraud, missing persons and child abuse units.
NEWS
January 5, 2006
On January 3, 2006, OLIVE W. BLOODSWORTH DAVIES beloved wife of the late E. Woodrow Bloodsworth and Stanley W. Davies, devoted mother of Olive May Abt and her husband Frederick W. Abt III and Martha Kulaga and her husband Louis N. Kulaga, loving grandmother of Rick and Lisa Abt, Laura and Ted Kaelber, Becky and Doug Bradley and Matt Kulaga and Emily Clayton and dear great-grandmother of Jonathan and Carli Abt and Mikayla Bradley. Relatives and friends are invited to call at SCHIMUNEK FUNERAL HOME INC., 9705 Belair Road (at Forge Road)
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,Sun Staff Writer | June 2, 1994
The Maryland Board of Public Works has agreed on a $300,000 payment to Kirk N. Bloodsworth, who was pardoned in December after spending nine years in prison when new evidence cast serious doubt on his guilt in the murder of a 9-year-old Rosedale girl.But the panel delayed a vote on the settlement yesterday, hoping to persuade Baltimore County, which prosecuted Mr. Bloodsworth, to provide as much as $50,000 toward the total.The board, composed of Gov. William Donald Schaefer, Treasurer Lucille Maurer and Comptroller Louis L. Goldstein, postponed action on the settlement for "wrongful imprisonment" until June 22 to give Baltimore County Executive Roger B. Hayden, who is recuperating from brain surgery, a chance to decide whether the county will contribute.
NEWS
June 29, 1993
July 1984 -- The body of 9-year-old Dawn Hamilton is found in a wooded area near the Fontana Village apartments.August 1984 -- Police arrest and charge Kirk Noble Bloodsworth, a burly former waterman from Cambridge.March 1985 -- A jury convicts Bloodsworth of Dawn Hamilton's murder. Baltimore County Judge J. William Hinkel sentences Bloodsworth to death.July 1986 -- The Maryland Court of Appeals, overturns Bloodsworth's conviction, saying prosecutors withheld evidence about another suspect.
NEWS
July 1, 1993
After spending nine years in prison for a murder he didn't commit, Kirk Noble Bloodsworth was able to walk out of the House of Corrections in Jessup Monday only because Maryland makes it hard to carry out the death penalty.The jury in Mr. Bloodsworth's first trial on charges of sexually assaulting and murdering a nine-year-old Rosedale girl did impose the ultimate penalty. When that verdict was thrown out on appeal, he was tried a second time and given two life sentences. He maintained his innocence and was finally freed this week only after a new type of DNA testing proved he wasn't the killer.
NEWS
By Glenn Small and Glenn Small,Staff Writer | July 24, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Until a month ago, few people wanted to listen to Kirk Noble Bloodsworth proclaim his innocence. He spent nine years in prison as a convicted child molester and murderer.But yesterday Mr. Bloodsworth had the ear of Congress, telling his story to a subcommittee listening to the debate over shortening the appeals process for death row inmates.After recounting his arrest, conviction and time spent in Maryland prisons, Mr. Bloodsworth urged members of the House Judiciary Subcommittee on Civil and Constitutional Rights not to speed up the appeals process.
NEWS
By Stephanie Hanes and Stephanie Hanes,SUN STAFF | September 11, 2003
The New York-based Innocence Project, a group that works to free the wrongfully convicted, is asking that an independent commission examine how Kirk Bloodsworth, an innocent Cambridge man, ended up on Maryland's death row. Some state lawmakers and lawyers have said they would support the creation of an independent group - similar to ones planned by North Carolina and Connecticut - to analyze Bloodsworth's and other wrongful convictions. "It's something I think might have some traction," said Sen. Brian E. Frosh, chairman of the Maryland Senate's Judicial Proceedings Committee.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | December 7, 2009
Kirk Bloodsworth, the first American death row inmate to be exonerated by DNA evidence, has lived to see something he never could have imagined -- an award named after him, and its first recipient a Democratic senator from Vermont. Tuesday night, at a Washington gala, Sen. Patrick Leahy receives the Kirk Bloodsworth Justice for All Award as an "outstanding champion of justice" for his sponsorship of the 2004 Innocence Protection Act, which, among other things, provides states with funding for DNA testing in criminal cases to avoid, or undo, wrongful convictions.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,peter.hermann@baltsun.com | October 14, 2009
Police Maj. Scott L. Bloodsworth stands on Charles Street in Federal Hill as the crowd of revelers swells. It's Friday, just before midnight, and already many patrons have had too much to drink. Outside Noble's Bar, a giddy young woman screams and runs into the open arms of a friend, sending both crashing to the pavement. Bloodsworth, who commands the Southern District, watches his officers watch the partyers. He has officers strategically placed along Charles and Cross streets, on blocks dominated by the biggest and most popular taverns, and near a bank machine and a parking garage.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,julie.bykowicz@baltsun.com | October 1, 2009
Two Baltimore programs that use DNA evidence in criminal cases will receive $307,000 from the National Institute of Justice, part of an award named after a former Maryland death row inmate who was exonerated by the forensic evidence, Gov. Martin O'Malley announced Wednesday. The Innocence Project, based at the University of Baltimore School of Law, which works to free wrongly convicted inmates, will get most of the Kirk Bloodsworth testing grant money. The Baltimore state's attorney's office's forensics division will receive about $13,000 to purchase computers to track and maintain documentation in forensic DNA cases that might later qualify for post-conviction testing.
NEWS
By PETER HERMANN and PETER HERMANN,peter.hermann@baltsun.com | November 30, 2008
John A. Steele Sr. was cremated without ceremony. Only his estranged wife and children attended the brief service at the Charles L. Stevens Funeral Home in Locust Point. No words were spoken. No death notice appeared in the paper. No obituary was written. Jane Steele loved her husband but couldn't live with him. She stayed married even after kicking him out of their Clement Street rowhouse 16 years ago. He had stopped working and turned to alcohol 16 years before that. She worked then in a factory, putting labels on cans, and she sewed dresses and cleaned houses to pay the mortgage.
NEWS
July 6, 2006
On July 3, 2006, MARIE B. MATACOTTA (nee Bloodsworth); beloved wife of the late Augusta J. Matacotta and devoted mother of Larry A. Ruark. Funeral Services and Interment will be at convenience of the family. Arrangements by MARZULLO FUNERAL CHAPEL, P.A., 410-254-5201.
NEWS
January 16, 2006
On January 14, 2006, EDWARD G., of Baltimore, beloved father of Sharon Baylin, of Baltimore and Valerie Bloodsworth, also survived by 3 grandchildren and 1 great-granddaughter. A Graveside service will be held at Parkwood Cemetery, Taylor Avenue, on Monday at 1 P.M. Family will receive friends at their residence following the service. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be made to Maryland SPCA, 300 Falls Rd, Baltimore, MD 21211-2403. Inquiries may be directed to CAFA Stephen D. Lohrmann C.A. at 410-321-1005.
NEWS
By Glenn Small and Glenn Small,Staff Writer | July 3, 1993
Now that Kirk Noble Bloodsworth has been freed from two consecutive life sentences for murder and sexual assault, will the state pay him for the nine years he spent behind bars?Mr. Bloodsworth, who was 23 when he was arrested in August 1984 and is now 32, certainly expects some compensation, although neither he nor his attorney will name a specific dollar figure.His attorney, Robert E. Morin, said he hopes the state will act in "good faith" and propose a package of money and support services, such as health care, counseling and education.
NEWS
January 5, 2006
On January 3, 2006, OLIVE W. BLOODSWORTH DAVIES beloved wife of the late E. Woodrow Bloodsworth and Stanley W. Davies, devoted mother of Olive May Abt and her husband Frederick W. Abt III and Martha Kulaga and her husband Louis N. Kulaga, loving grandmother of Rick and Lisa Abt, Laura and Ted Kaelber, Becky and Doug Bradley and Matt Kulaga and Emily Clayton and dear great-grandmother of Jonathan and Carli Abt and Mikayla Bradley. Relatives and friends are invited to call at SCHIMUNEK FUNERAL HOME INC., 9705 Belair Road (at Forge Road)
NEWS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,SUN STAFF | March 15, 2005
U.S. Sen. Paul S. Sarbanes urged the Navy yesterday to complete a full environmental study before it resumes bombing practice on Bloodsworth Island in the Chesapeake Bay. Sarbanes is concerned that the Navy, which stopped bombing and strafing runs on the island near Tangier Sound nine years ago, is not looking hard enough at alternatives to resuming live-fire training exercises and hasn't given the public enough notice. A full environmental impact study could take more than a year and would delve into all possible alternatives, as well as give the public more of a role in the decision.
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