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By NEWPORT NEWS DAILY PRESS | January 13, 1999
NORFOLK, Va. -- Researchers from NASA Langley and Eastern Virginia Medical School are teaming up to develop an interactive computer system that could help improve blood flow in diabetic patients. Loss of blood flow can lead to nerve damage, gangrene and amputation.The technology, which draws on NASA experiments for airplane pilots, lets patients see a simulated, three-dimensional network of their own blood vessels. Shown as red and blue images, the vessels move with the patient's own pulse and contract and expand depending how well blood is flowing.
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HEALTH
By Scott Calvert, The Baltimore Sun | February 22, 2013
Owls can rotate their heads a dizzying 270 degrees, allowing them to see what's happening behind them while perched on a tree branch or barn beam. This evolutionary adaptation helps the birds keep their fixed-socket, binocular eyes trained on the scurrying mice and other small prey they hunt. But how exactly do their necks seemingly defy the limitations of bones and blood vessels as they swivel around like a submarine periscope? Fabian de Kok-Mercado, a Johns Hopkins-trained medical illustrator and an owl enthusiast, was curious.
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BUSINESS
By Julie Bell and Julie Bell,SUN STAFF | July 19, 2001
EntreMed Inc. has made a key finding about how its well-publicized drug Endostatin works to block the growth of tumor-feeding blood vessels, a development the company hopes will allow it to strengthen patents and look for other new drugs that work in a similar way. The discovery was made by scientists at the Rockville-based drug developer and published in the July/August issue of the Journal of Biological Chemistry, the company announced yesterday....
HEALTH
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | June 29, 2012
Halfway around the world in India, Sivaprakash Ramalingam had heard of Johns Hopkins researchers using a promising new technique for gene therapy that he hoped to integrate with stem cells to cure diseases. After getting a doctorate in biochemistry in his native country, he came to Baltimore four years ago to study under the technique's pioneer, Srinivasan Chandrasegaran, at Hopkins' Bloomberg School of Public Health. Ramalingam's research has led him down the path of seeking a cure for sickle cell anemia, a painful, life-shortening blood disorder that afflicts many in his home region in southern India.
NEWS
December 1, 1997
Arthur Davis, 69, former chairman of the Iowa Democratic Party who resigned as Des Moines' mayor in March for health reasons, died of cancer Saturday. Mr. Davis, chairman of the party in the mid-1980s, was diagnosed with colon cancer five years ago.Dr. Sigrid Phyllis Stearner, 78, who studied the biological effects of radiation and campaigned for career opportunities for scientists with disabilities, died of pneumonia Nov. 17 at the Illinois Independent Living Center at Naperville, Ill. Dr. Stearner, who had cerebral palsy and used a motorized wheelchair, conducted research at the Argonne National Laboratory on the effects of ionizing radiation on the heart and blood vessels until she retired in 1981.
NEWS
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,Special to the Sun; King Features Syndicate | May 13, 2001
Q. Have you ever heard of sipping beer to stop a migraine? I went to a doctor in a little town in Louisiana, and he asked if I get an aura. Before my head starts to hurt, my vision changes, and I see little blinky lights. The doctor said I should drink a can of beer (not wine or liquor) as soon as I start to see the lights. Over the past 20 years, this remedy has worked almost every time. I thought some other migraine sufferers would like to know. A. Migraine headaches can be horrible, but one advantage of an aura is that it gives the sufferer a bit of warning before the headache strikes with full force.
SPORTS
By Frank Dell'Apa and Frank Dell'Apa,Boston Globe | May 15, 1992
Soon after Lyle Alzado developed the brain lymphoma that would eventually cause his death, he announced that the cancer had been caused by anabolic steroids and human growth hormone.Alzado, who died yesterday at age 43, said he hoped that by making his case public, he would help others learn from his mistakes."He used steroids to get bigger and to win," said Dr. Lyle Micheli, an orthopedic surgeon at Massachusetts General Hospital. "He was involved in a sport that requires size and strength."
SPORTS
By BOSTON GLOBE | January 17, 1996
BOSTON -- Physicians have apparently ruled out a seizure or other neurological disorder as the cause of star center Marcus Camby's collapse Sunday, and they were concentrating on tests of his heart and blood vessels in search of some elusive cardiovascular problem.Team doctor Daniel Clapp said the tests might include invasive procedures, such as angiography or snipping a piece of his heart muscle."We're still without an answer that's medically honest," Clapp said.
FEATURES
By Dr. Gabe Mirkin and Dr. Gabe Mirkin,United Feature Syndicate | November 19, 1991
Your blood pressure has two components: the systolic pressure, which is the pressure in your blood vessels when your heart contracts, and the diastolic pressure, which is the pressure in your vessels when your heart relaxes. If these numbers are 120 and 80, respectively, your blood pressure would be expressed as "120/80 millimeters of mercury" -- perfectly normal blood pressure.But what happens to that reading during exercise?During aerobic exercises (jogging, dancing, swimming or cycling)
NEWS
November 17, 2008
Heavy children have arteries of a 45-year-old obesity The arteries of many obese children and teenagers are as thick and stiff as those of 45-year-olds, a sign that such children could have severe cardiovascular disease at a much younger age than their parents unless their condition is reversed, researchers said Tuesday. "It's possible that they will have heart disease in their 20s and 30s," said Dr. Geetha Raghuveer of the University of Missouri at Kansas City, who led the study presented at a New Orleans meeting of the American Heart Association.
NEWS
January 25, 2010
Sometimes the appearance of a birthmark catches a new parent by surprise. Physicians are often quick to offer reassurance that most birthmarks are harmless, and many will shrink or disappear over time. Although that's true, a birthmark can also be the key to early identification of a rare disorder called Sturge-Weber Syndrome. Dr. Anne Comi, director of the Hunter Nelson Sturge-Weber Center at Kennedy Krieger Institute, tells us how to determine when a birthmark might be a sign of something more.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,kate.shatzkin@baltsun.com | November 16, 2009
Diabetic retinopathy is the most common cause of moderate and severe vision loss in working-age Americans. It is a major public health problem now, and it will become even more so as the incidence of type 2 diabetes increases, says Dr. Peter Campochiaro, a professor of ophthalmology and neuroscience at the Wilmer Eye Institute at Johns Hopkins. Obesity predisposes people to type 2 diabetes, and thus, to retinopathy. A healthy diet and regular exercise help reduce obesity and the risk of diabetes.
NEWS
November 17, 2008
Heavy children have arteries of a 45-year-old obesity The arteries of many obese children and teenagers are as thick and stiff as those of 45-year-olds, a sign that such children could have severe cardiovascular disease at a much younger age than their parents unless their condition is reversed, researchers said Tuesday. "It's possible that they will have heart disease in their 20s and 30s," said Dr. Geetha Raghuveer of the University of Missouri at Kansas City, who led the study presented at a New Orleans meeting of the American Heart Association.
FEATURES
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon | March 6, 2008
Is there anything in the way of vitamins or herbs that a person can take instead of a prescription drug for high blood pressure? I've heard about garlic, but I don't like it much. Is there anything else? The newest candidate for natural blood pressure control is beet juice. A study in the journal Hypertension (online Feb. 4, 2008) showed that 2 cups (500 milliliters) of beet juice lowered blood pressure by about 10 points. That is better than many prescription drugs. The effect lasts up to 24 hours.
FEATURES
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,Sun reporter | November 1, 2007
Juan Cruz, a former Defense Department accountant, was burned over 50 percent of his body when terrorists crashed an airliner into the Pentagon on Sept 11, 2001. "All I remember is that I was burning. My clothes were burning, and there was smoke all around," said Cruz, 57. Since then, he has been through 40 surgical procedures, two cornea transplants and major facial reconstruction. He has had to give up driving because his vision is so clouded. But Cruz, whose face was reconstructed at the Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center, represents a patient that plastic surgeons are seeing more often these days: the kind who wouldn't have survived years ago. As military surgeons, hospital emergency departments and urban trauma centers improve survival rates for victims critically injured in fires and accidents and on battlefields, their patients are increasingly winding up in the care of specialists whose domain has long been associated with the tummy tuck and the nose job. "There's no question more people are surviving, and it's creating a whole new set of challenges," said Dr. Paul Cederna, a plastic surgeon from the University of Michigan Health Systems, who joined 6,000 colleagues in Baltimore this week for the American Society of Plastic Surgeons' annual convention.
NEWS
By Judy Foreman | January 19, 2007
Why does my nose run in the cold? Nobody knows for sure, but one reason is that the nose has to "work overtime," when the inspired air is cold, said Dr. Ralph Metson, a sinus surgeon at the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary. The nose is a kind of "fancy air conditioner" whose job is to warm and humidify the air we inhale, Metson wrote in an e-mail. When the air we breathe in is unusually cold, the nose kicks into high gear to warm and humidify it - blood vessels dilate, mucosal tissue swells and glands secrete extra mucus.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,Sun Staff Writer | May 14, 1994
Baltimore County Executive Roger B. Hayden left Johns Hopkins Hospital yesterday and will spend the weekend with relatives while deciding on treatment for a condition that caused a blood vessel to rupture in his head Sunday.County Communications Director Robert Hughes said Mr. Hayden "sounded good -- in great spirits," when they spoke briefly yesterday afternoon by telephone.Hopkins neurosurgeons treating the county executive conferred with him Thursday and again yesterday about treatment, Mr. Hughes said.
NEWS
By NEWSDAY | August 16, 2005
Nitroglycerin - a key component of TNT - has been a medicine cabinet mainstay for 150 years, but scientists who studied its effects on cells say doctors should rethink its use. A team of medical researchers who have been analyzing the effects of nitroglycerin for years have concluded that it can have a "biologically corrosive" effect on some people, especially those with diabetes, transforming their blood vessels into the equivalent of rusted pipes....
NEWS
By JUDY FOREMAN | July 7, 2006
Medical Matters Is Viagra, the erectile dysfunction drug, good for the heart, too? Probably, although more studies are needed. In the first human study of its kind, Dr. David Kass, a cardiologist at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, reported last fall in the journal Circulation that Viagra can suppress the effects of stress hormones on the heart, a potential boon to many people with heart disease. In the study, 35 healthy male and female volunteers were given a drug called dobutamine, which stimulates the heart much as the natural hormone, adrenalin, does.
NEWS
By FRANK D. ROYLANCE and FRANK D. ROYLANCE,SUN REPORTER | June 9, 2006
Every year, nearly 12 million American heart patients are wired up and put on bikes or treadmills for stress tests, designed to reveal how well blood flows to their heart muscle. In 75 percent of those tests, doctors inject a radioactive tracer into the bloodstream, and a gamma-ray camera reveals how well the blood flows into the coronary arteries during both rest and exercise. These "nuclear" stress tests show constricted blood vessels or dark spots - evidence of muscle scarring from past heart attacks.
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