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NEWS
January 7, 1991
The Greater Chesapeake and Potomac Regional Red Cross is focusing efforts on increasing donations of Type O and Type B blood in January, which is National Volunteer Blood Donor Month.Type O is the most common blood type and is the type most often used. Type O also is used in medical emergencies when there is no time to determine the patient's blood type.Twenty percent of blacks have Type B blood, compared with 9 percent of Caucasians. Blacks suffering from sickle cell anemia and other acute or chronic illnesses need frequent blood transfusions.
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HEALTH
By Nancy Jones-Bonbrest, Special to The Baltimore Sun | December 24, 2010
Brian Boyle is the perfect spokesman. After all, who would better understand the importance of donating blood than someone who required 36 blood transfusions after an automobile accident in 2004 in Southern Maryland left him with 60 percent blood loss and catastrophic injuries. Knowing the holiday rush is a difficult time to find blood donors, Boyle, 24, offered up his services last winter by hosting a series of Iron Heart blood drives, named for the autobiography he wrote about his ordeal.
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NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | April 9, 1998
Because of a nationwide shortage of the "universal" blood type, the Chesapeake branch of the American Red Cross said yesterday that it is rationing type O blood throughout the Baltimore-Washington region."
NEWS
By LAURA VOZZELLA | October 28, 2007
A. Robert Kaufman is closer to getting a kidney, no thanks to how he's listed in the phone book. Baltimore's most steadfast Socialist, who's always running for something, including mayor this year, has never persuaded many citizens to give him their votes. But someone who saw him in the televised mayoral debate in August wants to give him a kidney. Kaufman has been in need of a kidney and on dialysis ever since a near-fatal beating and stabbing in 2005. He never misses a chance to make a public plea for an organ.
NEWS
By ZICK RUBIN | September 26, 1994
Boston. -- Teams of jury consultants engaged by the prosecution and the defense in the O.J. Simpson trial have each come up with their wish lists -- those members of the Los Angeles County jury pool whom they will try to get on the jury. Here are the secret lists, obtained by this correspondent from anonymous sources in the Los Angeles bar.The Government'sTop Six Jurors1. Albert Barnes, age 44, white, traveling salesperson, Burbank, blood type A. Private investigator reports that Mr. Barnes rented a car from Hertz in the mid-1980s after watching the commercials in which Mr. Simpson vaults into the driver's seat.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,SUN STAFF | June 8, 2002
Wilhemenia Freeman was driving to work six years ago when, she said, God spoke to her. "He said, `It's going to be your kidney,'" said Freeman, 49, who lives in Ellicott City, and she believed. She believed even after doctors told her she couldn't donate a kidney to her husband, Bill Freeman, whose kidneys had failed a year earlier, because her blood type wasn't compatible. And she kept on believing while her husband languished on dialysis for two more years with little hope of getting an organ from an outside donor.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | August 9, 2002
Blood Work pits Clint Eastwood as a retired FBI profiler with a rare blood type - and a recent heart transplant - against the man who shot his female heart donor. The title is an apt pun for the hero's medical and detective operations. If you put the word Tired first, it would perfectly describe the movie. As written by Brian Helgeland (from a novel by Michael Connelly) and directed by Eastwood, this low-key L.A. thriller mixes the forensic detective work done with more sophistication on half a dozen current TV shows with an ultimate solution culled from the bottom half of a B-film double-bill.
HEALTH
By Nancy Jones-Bonbrest, Special to The Baltimore Sun | December 24, 2010
Brian Boyle is the perfect spokesman. After all, who would better understand the importance of donating blood than someone who required 36 blood transfusions after an automobile accident in 2004 in Southern Maryland left him with 60 percent blood loss and catastrophic injuries. Knowing the holiday rush is a difficult time to find blood donors, Boyle, 24, offered up his services last winter by hosting a series of Iron Heart blood drives, named for the autobiography he wrote about his ordeal.
NEWS
By LAURA VOZZELLA | October 28, 2007
A. Robert Kaufman is closer to getting a kidney, no thanks to how he's listed in the phone book. Baltimore's most steadfast Socialist, who's always running for something, including mayor this year, has never persuaded many citizens to give him their votes. But someone who saw him in the televised mayoral debate in August wants to give him a kidney. Kaufman has been in need of a kidney and on dialysis ever since a near-fatal beating and stabbing in 2005. He never misses a chance to make a public plea for an organ.
NEWS
By Joe Nawrozki and Joe Nawrozki,SUN STAFF | May 21, 1996
In a medical oddity, 9-year-old Kendall Burrows' blood keeps killing itself.Last week, Kendall needed 300 units of blood and blood components to sustain her life. This week, the urgency remains -- both for Kendall and the American Red Cross, which is trying to help her despite being hard-pressed to keep up with demand throughout the region.Kendall suffers from two ailments producing antibodies that attack her own red blood cells and blood platelets."Doctors have to keep the body flushing, making blood exchanges, so the antibodies don't mass produce and overtake her red blood cells," the child's mother, Debi Burrows, said yesterday.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | August 9, 2002
Blood Work pits Clint Eastwood as a retired FBI profiler with a rare blood type - and a recent heart transplant - against the man who shot his female heart donor. The title is an apt pun for the hero's medical and detective operations. If you put the word Tired first, it would perfectly describe the movie. As written by Brian Helgeland (from a novel by Michael Connelly) and directed by Eastwood, this low-key L.A. thriller mixes the forensic detective work done with more sophistication on half a dozen current TV shows with an ultimate solution culled from the bottom half of a B-film double-bill.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,SUN STAFF | June 8, 2002
Wilhemenia Freeman was driving to work six years ago when, she said, God spoke to her. "He said, `It's going to be your kidney,'" said Freeman, 49, who lives in Ellicott City, and she believed. She believed even after doctors told her she couldn't donate a kidney to her husband, Bill Freeman, whose kidneys had failed a year earlier, because her blood type wasn't compatible. And she kept on believing while her husband languished on dialysis for two more years with little hope of getting an organ from an outside donor.
NEWS
By Jason Song and By Jason Song,SUN STAFF | December 23, 2001
Allie Nordhoff's life became a big game of Telephone two weeks ago. You know, Telephone: the game in which you sit in a circle and one person whispers a story into the next one's ear. Then it's whispered into the next ear, and so on. But it was serious for 12- year-old Allie, who has aplastic anemia, a disease that turns the body's immune system against itself. Allie is taking part in a study at the Johns Hopkins University and was taking a toxic drug designed to make her body produce healthy blood.
NEWS
By Ernest F. Imhoff and Ernest F. Imhoff,SUN STAFF | January 12, 1999
The American Red Cross is critically short of blood types O and B positive and negative and needs donations as soon as possible, the agency said yesterday.For about three weeks, blood supplies in the Greater Chesapeake and Potomac region have been below normal. The usual holiday decline in donations was accompanied by the unavailability of blood supplies from the stormy Midwest, said Patrick Smith, a Red Cross spokesman."It's a domino effect," said Smith. "The storm kept many people from giving in the Midwest and that left us without a safety net, which we usually have.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | April 9, 1998
Because of a nationwide shortage of the "universal" blood type, the Chesapeake branch of the American Red Cross said yesterday that it is rationing type O blood throughout the Baltimore-Washington region."
NEWS
By Joe Nawrozki and Joe Nawrozki,SUN STAFF | May 21, 1996
In a medical oddity, 9-year-old Kendall Burrows' blood keeps killing itself.Last week, Kendall needed 300 units of blood and blood components to sustain her life. This week, the urgency remains -- both for Kendall and the American Red Cross, which is trying to help her despite being hard-pressed to keep up with demand throughout the region.Kendall suffers from two ailments producing antibodies that attack her own red blood cells and blood platelets."Doctors have to keep the body flushing, making blood exchanges, so the antibodies don't mass produce and overtake her red blood cells," the child's mother, Debi Burrows, said yesterday.
NEWS
By Jason Song and By Jason Song,SUN STAFF | December 23, 2001
Allie Nordhoff's life became a big game of Telephone two weeks ago. You know, Telephone: the game in which you sit in a circle and one person whispers a story into the next one's ear. Then it's whispered into the next ear, and so on. But it was serious for 12- year-old Allie, who has aplastic anemia, a disease that turns the body's immune system against itself. Allie is taking part in a study at the Johns Hopkins University and was taking a toxic drug designed to make her body produce healthy blood.
NEWS
By Ernest F. Imhoff and Ernest F. Imhoff,SUN STAFF | January 12, 1999
The American Red Cross is critically short of blood types O and B positive and negative and needs donations as soon as possible, the agency said yesterday.For about three weeks, blood supplies in the Greater Chesapeake and Potomac region have been below normal. The usual holiday decline in donations was accompanied by the unavailability of blood supplies from the stormy Midwest, said Patrick Smith, a Red Cross spokesman."It's a domino effect," said Smith. "The storm kept many people from giving in the Midwest and that left us without a safety net, which we usually have.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | March 4, 1996
The American Red Cross is moving its most important tissue-typing and immunologic research laboratory to Baltimore, bringing with it close to 60 jobs and an annual payroll of about $2.5 million.Now in Rockville, the National HLA Reference Laboratory will be moved by summer to the University of Maryland Medical Center on Greene Street. The hospital is spending $3 million to renovate 11,000 square feet on its second floor.The laboratory performs state-of-the-art blood and tissue typing vital to the success of organ and bone-marrow transplants.
NEWS
By ZICK RUBIN | September 26, 1994
Boston. -- Teams of jury consultants engaged by the prosecution and the defense in the O.J. Simpson trial have each come up with their wish lists -- those members of the Los Angeles County jury pool whom they will try to get on the jury. Here are the secret lists, obtained by this correspondent from anonymous sources in the Los Angeles bar.The Government'sTop Six Jurors1. Albert Barnes, age 44, white, traveling salesperson, Burbank, blood type A. Private investigator reports that Mr. Barnes rented a car from Hertz in the mid-1980s after watching the commercials in which Mr. Simpson vaults into the driver's seat.
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