Advertisement
HomeCollectionsBlood Products
IN THE NEWS

Blood Products

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,Staff Writer | September 15, 1993
MedImmune Inc. announced yesterday a preliminary agreement to buy a New York-based blood-product company -- a $45 million deal that would double the size of the Gaithersburg-based biotech company.The purchase of Melville Biologics, a developer, manufacturer and distributor of blood derivative products, would provide five new products and more manufacturing capacity, MedImmune said.Melville, a 130-employee company based on Long Island, is a division of the nonprofit New York Blood Center. It handles manufacturing and commercialization of all blood derivative products and related technologies developed by the center, the nation's largest independent blood-collection organization.
ARTICLES BY DATE
EXPLORE
Aegis staff report | July 31, 2013
The American Red Cross and the Cal Ripken Youth Baseball Division are teaming up to host the inaugural Red Cross Day Blood Drive during the Cal Ripken World Series in Aberdeen on Aug.17, from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Each donor will receive a coupon for a Free Dunkin' Donuts iced coffee and doughnut, a voucher for one ticket to an upcoming Orioles home game, one reserved seat at the Cal Ripken World Series and will have the opportunity to be included in...
Advertisement
NEWS
By Dan Fesperman and Dan Fesperman,Berlin Bureau | November 20, 1993
BERLIN -- A scandal of AIDS-tainted blood products that has panicked millions of Germans has awakened European health officials to even greater blood-supply hazards in Eastern Europe.Partly for that reason, and partly in response to the German panic, the 27-nation European Council is organizing a summit next month of national health ministers and AIDS experts in hopes of setting new standards for handling blood and blood products."We're working at this very moment to try and address this issue in order to avoid something like this happening again," said Dr. Jean Emmanuel, a blood-supply expert with the World Health Organization in Geneva.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | October 13, 2012
Many patients taken to the University of Maryland's Shock Trauma Center in Baltimore cling to life, barely able to breathe, much less consent to participate in a medical trial, a reality that makes trauma research extremely difficult. With life-saving advances so hard to identify, researchers at Shock Trauma now hope to get around that problem — and answer one of trauma medicine's vexing questions — by declaring nearly everyone a potential test subject. The Baltimore hospital is one of 12 trauma centers around the country aiming to use a controversial bureaucratic tool to bypass individual consent and conduct the type of large-scale medical experiment that has proved elusive in the messy, life-and-death specialty of trauma care.
NEWS
By Holly Selby and Holly Selby,Sun Staff Writer | March 11, 1994
A new medical clinic for HIV-positive hemophiliacs -- a symbol of recognition to many of its patients -- opens today at Johns Hopkins Hospital.The aim is to provide comprehensive health care to adult hemophiliacs in Maryland who were infected with the human immunodeficiency virus by the blood products meant to help them. The clinic will be staffed jointly by personnel from Hopkins and St. Agnes Hospital."This may be a small clinic, but it's a major thing for these people, and it's long overdue," said Annette Maurits, president of the Maryland chapter of the National Hemophilia Foundation.
NEWS
By Holly Selby and Holly Selby,Sun Staff Writer | December 11, 1994
About five times a month, Charles Robinson, a hemophiliac, uses a medical treatment manufactured from human blood to help clot his own blood.Two weeks ago, he received a letter from the distributor -- the American Red Cross -- informing him that some of the blood-clotting factor he uses might contain blood from a donor who later developed a rare, fatal brain disease called Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD).The product had been withdrawn from the market about three weeks before Mr. Robinson was notified.
NEWS
By Holly Selby and Holly Selby,Staff Writer | September 19, 1993
Jim Miller of Dundalk never envisioned himself as an activist, testifying before the city council, speaking out angrily on TV and protesting at a national conference.Having battled hemophilia all his life, the 44-year-old father of three never dreamed he'd be fighting to survive AIDS, either.His plight and his anger reflect a massive tragedy. About half the nation's hemophiliacs are HIV positive because the blood products prescribed for them contained the deadly virus.For Mr. Miller, a huge burden became a crushing one. Hemophilia made his joints swollen, his movements painful.
NEWS
By H. B. Johnson Jr | September 19, 1994
I FEEL great!The walk up the hill from my friend's house on West Lexington Street had left me exhausted by the time I reached Pulaski Street. But I was lucky. The bus was just stopping when I arrived. I hopped on, paid my fare, and dropped into the first seat beyond those reserved for the elderly.BEverything was fine until I realized that the air-conditioning was on. The weather outside was warm, but not that warm!As almost any person with AIDS will tell you, cold temperatures play havoc with us physically.
EXPLORE
Aegis staff report | July 31, 2013
The American Red Cross and the Cal Ripken Youth Baseball Division are teaming up to host the inaugural Red Cross Day Blood Drive during the Cal Ripken World Series in Aberdeen on Aug.17, from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Each donor will receive a coupon for a Free Dunkin' Donuts iced coffee and doughnut, a voucher for one ticket to an upcoming Orioles home game, one reserved seat at the Cal Ripken World Series and will have the opportunity to be included in...
NEWS
September 25, 1994
Act on BloodOn Sept. 12, I attended the Institute of Medicine (in Washington) investigation of HIV and the blood supply. Hemophiliacs have been the recipients of HIV-contaminated blood products. The hemophilia community is dying at the rate of one a day. Our principal speakers for hemophiliacs and their concerns about the safety of their blood products were not allowed to relate verbally all their evidence. Only seven minutes of time was allotted to testify verbally. Only one day of public hearings was scheduled.
NEWS
By Holly Selby and Holly Selby,Sun Staff Writer | December 11, 1994
About five times a month, Charles Robinson, a hemophiliac, uses a medical treatment manufactured from human blood to help clot his own blood.Two weeks ago, he received a letter from the distributor -- the American Red Cross -- informing him that some of the blood-clotting factor he uses might contain blood from a donor who later developed a rare, fatal brain disease called Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD).The product had been withdrawn from the market about three weeks before Mr. Robinson was notified.
NEWS
September 25, 1994
Act on BloodOn Sept. 12, I attended the Institute of Medicine (in Washington) investigation of HIV and the blood supply. Hemophiliacs have been the recipients of HIV-contaminated blood products. The hemophilia community is dying at the rate of one a day. Our principal speakers for hemophiliacs and their concerns about the safety of their blood products were not allowed to relate verbally all their evidence. Only seven minutes of time was allotted to testify verbally. Only one day of public hearings was scheduled.
NEWS
By H. B. Johnson Jr | September 19, 1994
I FEEL great!The walk up the hill from my friend's house on West Lexington Street had left me exhausted by the time I reached Pulaski Street. But I was lucky. The bus was just stopping when I arrived. I hopped on, paid my fare, and dropped into the first seat beyond those reserved for the elderly.BEverything was fine until I realized that the air-conditioning was on. The weather outside was warm, but not that warm!As almost any person with AIDS will tell you, cold temperatures play havoc with us physically.
NEWS
By Holly Selby and Holly Selby,Sun Staff Writer | March 11, 1994
A new medical clinic for HIV-positive hemophiliacs -- a symbol of recognition to many of its patients -- opens today at Johns Hopkins Hospital.The aim is to provide comprehensive health care to adult hemophiliacs in Maryland who were infected with the human immunodeficiency virus by the blood products meant to help them. The clinic will be staffed jointly by personnel from Hopkins and St. Agnes Hospital."This may be a small clinic, but it's a major thing for these people, and it's long overdue," said Annette Maurits, president of the Maryland chapter of the National Hemophilia Foundation.
NEWS
By Dan Fesperman and Dan Fesperman,Berlin Bureau | November 20, 1993
BERLIN -- A scandal of AIDS-tainted blood products that has panicked millions of Germans has awakened European health officials to even greater blood-supply hazards in Eastern Europe.Partly for that reason, and partly in response to the German panic, the 27-nation European Council is organizing a summit next month of national health ministers and AIDS experts in hopes of setting new standards for handling blood and blood products."We're working at this very moment to try and address this issue in order to avoid something like this happening again," said Dr. Jean Emmanuel, a blood-supply expert with the World Health Organization in Geneva.
NEWS
By Holly Selby and Holly Selby,Staff Writer | September 19, 1993
Jim Miller of Dundalk never envisioned himself as an activist, testifying before the city council, speaking out angrily on TV and protesting at a national conference.Having battled hemophilia all his life, the 44-year-old father of three never dreamed he'd be fighting to survive AIDS, either.His plight and his anger reflect a massive tragedy. About half the nation's hemophiliacs are HIV positive because the blood products prescribed for them contained the deadly virus.For Mr. Miller, a huge burden became a crushing one. Hemophilia made his joints swollen, his movements painful.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | October 13, 2012
Many patients taken to the University of Maryland's Shock Trauma Center in Baltimore cling to life, barely able to breathe, much less consent to participate in a medical trial, a reality that makes trauma research extremely difficult. With life-saving advances so hard to identify, researchers at Shock Trauma now hope to get around that problem — and answer one of trauma medicine's vexing questions — by declaring nearly everyone a potential test subject. The Baltimore hospital is one of 12 trauma centers around the country aiming to use a controversial bureaucratic tool to bypass individual consent and conduct the type of large-scale medical experiment that has proved elusive in the messy, life-and-death specialty of trauma care.
NEWS
November 18, 1999
Alfred Haessig, 78, a Red Cross doctor who was convicted of supervising distribution of HIV-infected blood products to hemophiliacs, died Sunday in Geneva, Switzerland, after a long illness.In December, a Geneva court held that Dr. Haessig, a former director of the Swiss central laboratory of the Red Cross, put people at risk through his actions in the 1980s. The court said he had acted out of "pride and stubbornness."
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,Staff Writer | September 15, 1993
MedImmune Inc. announced yesterday a preliminary agreement to buy a New York-based blood-product company -- a $45 million deal that would double the size of the Gaithersburg-based biotech company.The purchase of Melville Biologics, a developer, manufacturer and distributor of blood derivative products, would provide five new products and more manufacturing capacity, MedImmune said.Melville, a 130-employee company based on Long Island, is a division of the nonprofit New York Blood Center. It handles manufacturing and commercialization of all blood derivative products and related technologies developed by the center, the nation's largest independent blood-collection organization.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.